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Posted 10/3/2011 1:07pm by John and Aimee Good.

FARM NEWS

 The last day for CSA Vegetable pickups will be Tuesday, October 11th and Friday, October 14th. On the 11th and 14th the Stocking-Up orders will be ready for pickup, and Wild For Salmon will be at the CSA barn holding a Salmon Stock-up Sale for our members. The fruit shares and Pastured Poultry Stock-up orders will be available in the CSA barn on the following week, Tuesday October 18th and Friday October 21st during normal pickup hours, 2-7 pm.

Member renewals for Quiet Creek Farm 2012 season will be done through the website this year, after the end of the season. Renewal information will be posted on the website, and all current members will receive an email notice when this is ready. As usual, all current members will have their spots held until the end of 2011. We will begin taking new members from the waiting list in 2012. If you have any family, friends, or neighbors who are interested in a CSA share, they can get on the waiting list by going to the “Join the Farm” page on the website, www.quietcreekfarmcsa.com.

Pray for sunshine. We need the fields to dry so we can dig the last potatoes, and the head lettuce needs just a bit of “growing weather” to form heads by next week!

This is a picture of the potato digger, which we pull behind the tractor. As you can see it has a large wire conveyor which the potatoes roll over and the soil falls through. This leaves the potatoes on or near the surface for the crew to gather into buckets. In action, the potato digger is a loud, shaking, clanging implement; reminiscent of a machine in a Dr. Suess book. We love it, for it saves us a LOT of work -  hard, heavy, dirty work!

 

THE HARVEST

Sweet Potatoes

Leeks

Garlic

Onions

Green Peppers

Butternut Squash

Asian spinach and/or Head Lettuce (quantities limited!)

Eggplant

CHOICE: Beets, Cabbage, Broccoli, Tomatoes, Turnips, Shallots

Upick:  Fresh herbs & flowers.

 

 

RECIPES

I have included some of my old favorite recipes from my files this week. Braised Leeks is a creamy mild side dish using several leeks.  Winter Curry is quite delicious, and uses many of the vegetables in the harvest now. You can also easily substitute with whatever you have an hand.

 My Best Pumpkin Pie recipe is necessary for this time of year. A sweet winter squash, such as butternut or sunshine, is great for making pumpkin pie.  And nothing beats making it from scratch, from real squash or pumpkins rather than a can. To make life easier, I often roast several squash at a time, then scoop and puree the flesh and freeze it in 1, 2 or 3 cup containers.

We often think of pasta dishes using the summer tomatoes, but creamy pasta with roots and greens is wonderful in the fall. Winter Vegetable Pasta with Cheese is also a great way to use leftover veggies, turning them creatively into something new and pleasing.

Enjoy the harvest!

Your farmers,

John and Aimee Good

Posted 9/28/2011 9:35am by John and Aimee Good.
Wild for Salmon will be holding their annual "Stocking Up" Sale at Quiet Creek Farm on Tuesday October 11th and Friday October 14th. If you are interested in salmon for your freezer, please click on the link below.

http://archive.constantcontact.com/fs030/1102467033824/archive/1107842200368.html

Here you will find a product list, prices, bulk discount information, and ordering procedure. Do not reply to this email to place orders. Contact Jenn at info@wildforsalmon.com with any questions. Thanks!






Posted 9/26/2011 7:12pm by John and Aimee Good.

CSA Pickup End Date

Our best estimate for the last week of CSA pickup is the second week of October, Tuesday October 11th and Friday October 14th. If the produce is there, we may go one week longer. We will let you know as soon as we know.

The fruit shares will end the third week of October, that is October 18th and 21st, and the barn will be open for members to get their fruit shares, whether or not we have vegetable shares.

 

Stocking Up Sale

The annual Stocking Up Sale is here. If you have enjoyed the local, pastured meats and dairy products offered in our farm store, now is the time to place an order to stock up for the winter. The meats will keep in your freezer through the winter and spring. The vacuum-sealed cheeses will keep in your fridge for a month at least, (it is aged for 6 months before being sold) and can also be frozen. Freezing changes the texture, and the thawed cheese is then best for cooking and casseroles. The fresh mozzarella, ricotta, and cream cheese freeze very well.

Click on this link to access the order form. Please either email your order or print the form and bring it to the barn this week. All orders must be placed by noon on Monday, October 3rd. Orders will be filled on a “first come, first served” basis, and are subject to availability. Orders must be picked up on Tuesday October 11th and Friday October 14th. Payment is due at time of pick-up. Thank you.

 

Wild for Salmon and Ledamete Grass Farm will also be holding "stocking up" sales on salmon and chicken, respectively. Look for more information about these sales shortly.


Your farmers,

John and Aimee Good

Posted 9/26/2011 1:45pm by John and Aimee Good.

FARM NEWS

The newly dug sweet potatoes are the highlight this week. We have received requests to grow sweet potatoes for several years now. We finally found a supplier of certified organic sweet potato slips, so we decided do a trial planting. Good news – they did very well this season! The yields were great – 2000 lbs from two 300 foot beds.  And, most importantly, they are quite tasty. We hope you enjoy them!

Thankfully, the winter squash yielded well and there will be more in the share again this week.  We raise squash tranplants, then put out two plants every 18 inches apart in rows five feet apart. But by the time the squash is ready for harvest, it looks like a solid mass of green, the vines of the plants have spread so far. John is checking on the fruits in this picture. See the recipes below for new ideas to cook these autumn treats.

More rain and lack of sun continues. In a more normal fall, we are able to pick kale several times, but it is re-growing very slowly. We hope to have kale again in the upcoming weeks. The turnips and radishes should have been ready for harvest two weeks ago, yet they are still not. At least they are still growing, and not rotting. That sad fate has befallen the entire planting of rutabaga. On the bright side, we do hope to begin harvesting our second planting of fall broccoli next week, as well as the red cabbages. The head lettuce in the hoophouse is growing slowly, but hopefully will be ready in 2 weeks. Enjoy the harvest.

 

THE HARVEST

New – Sweet Potatoes

Leeks

Garlic

Onions

Sweet Peppers

Winter Squash: choice of Delicata, Sunshine, and Butternut Squash

Tomatoes

CHOICE: Beets, Cabbage, Potatoes, Eggplant

Upick:  Fresh herbs & flowers. Sadly, the Upick season is drawing to a close.

Coming Soon: Red Cabbage

 

RECIPES

I love winter squash. To me, it is like a dessert vegetable. Most often, we just roast it, adding a pat of butter and splash of maple syrup in the cavity at the end. And this is wonderful, but experimenting in the kitchen is so much fun, and these new squash recipes are delicious. For a very kid-friendly fun baking project, make “Melt-in-your-mouth” Squash Biscuits. Silky-Coconut Pumpkin Soup is a unique variation on squash soup with creamy coconut milk, from a Southeast Asian cookbook. Also try the Roasted Butternut Squash over Pasta, a simple creamy autumn pasta dish. Check the recipe page for the details. Enjoy!

 

CSA PICKUP END DATE & STOCKING UP SALES!!!

Our best estimate for the last week of CSA pickup is the second week of October, Tuesday October 11th and Friday October 14th. If the produce is there, we may go one week longer. We will let you know as soon as we know. The fruit shares will end the third week of October, that is October 18th and 21st, and the barn will be open for members to get their fruit shares, whether or not we have vegetable shares.

 

We are planning to have the annual Stock Up Sale on October 11th and 14th. A separate email with the order form and information will follow. Orders must be placed by noon on October 3rd, and are filled on a first come, first served basis. So don't delay!

Also, Jenn Kurian of Wild for Salmon will be at the barn on October 11th and 14th with salmon to fill your freezer for winter. April Fix of Ledamete Grass Farm will also be offering a Stock-up Sale on chickens. More information on these sales will follow.

Your farmers,

John and Aimee Good


Posted 9/19/2011 2:51pm by John and Aimee Good.

FARM NEWS

The cool weather signifies the coming of autumn, and unfortunately, the fading of our summer fruits, such as the raspberries, eggplant, and tomatoes. The red peppers usually last the longest, often until first frost. The new vegetable for this week is leeks, one of the longest growing vegetables on the farm. They are seeded in February in the greenhouse, planted into the fields in April, and not harvested until September. But they are worth waiting for; so creamy and mellow. Sauté slowly in butter wherever you would like a mild onion flavor, and of course make Potato Leek soup – so easy and delicious.

Also new this week is the Butternut squash and Sunshine squash. The butternut harvest was plentiful and the fruits are quite nice. The Sunshine squash, whose trial last year was a success, did not meet our expectations this year. The fruits are still quite yummy and sweet with a dryer flesh than Butternut, but the plants did not yield well and the fruits are not as large as last year. However, this was a challenging growing season, and so we will give them another chance next year. Our general rule is to give something three seasons before either ruling it a success or failure, because growing conditions can vary so much from year to year.

As you all know, we have sustained many crop losses this fall, particularly in the greens fields: all the salad greens, arugula, lettuce, spinach, cauliflower, and some of the broccoli and cabbage. We have also lost some roots and potatoes due to rotting, at the wetter end of the fields. We are lucky to have had our longest tomato season ever this year, and for the nice crop of paste tomatoes, red peppers, and eggplant which has continued into September. Still, we feel we may have to end the season early. Usually we continue shares until at least the last week of October, and occasionally 1 week in November. However, losing the greens crops means we will be without a major component of our shares for September. Rather than stretch out the weeks to the end of October with minimal shares, we plan to distribute all we have available for as long as that lasts, and hope to provide plentiful shares for the weeks to come. We do not have a definite date that the CSA season will end as of yet. We will let you know as soon as we know.  Thanks for your understanding.

Your farmers,

John and Aimee Good

 

THE HARVEST

New – Leeks

Potatoes

Garlic

Onions

Sweet Peppers

Winter Squash: choice of Delicata, Sunshine, and Butternut Squash

Tomatoes & Eggplant – limited quantities or choice; their harvest is nearly over.

CHOICE: Beets, Cabbage, Broccoli

Upick:  Fresh herbs & flowers,  Edamame, Hot Peppers. Cherry & Paste tomatoes may be in limited quantities this week, as their harvest is drawing to a close. The raspberry season is also ending, and they will be “snacking” only.

Coming Soon: Sweet Potatoes

 

RECIPES

The colder weather this past week has turned my appetite, and my cooking, towards soups and warming casseroles. Potato-Leek Soup, my favorite fall soup, is so simple yet so good.  Curried Squash Soup is sweet and savory, blended with warming curry spices.  Autumn Vegetable Gratin creates creamy layers of baked winter squash, potato and fennel.  Country Cabbage Soup is a simple cabbage & root soup flavored with caraway seeds. Smashed Potatoes and Cabbage is a yummy variation on smashed potatoes, with onions and cabbage and potatoes cooked and smashed all in one pot. Check the recipe page for the details. Enjoy!

Posted 9/12/2011 8:48pm by John and Aimee Good.

FARM NEWS

The good news is that the paste tomatoes finally came in! We had great picking last week, and many of you were brave enough to venture out into the swampy fields to pick – good for you! It looks like we will have good picking again this week as well. And there are still lots of edamame in the garden. Enjoy what you want fresh, and put the rest in the freezer. I like to cook them all and freeze the shelled beans, but you can also freeze the whole pods after just a light blanching.

New in the harvest this week is the Delicata Squash. This is probably my favorite squash. The skins are so tender you can easily eat them, making this a wonderful squash for stuffing. Also, I love to cut them into ½ inch rounds, toss them in olive oil and salt, and roast them in a 400 degree oven for about 25 minutes, until tender, like sweet squash oven fries!

The broccoli harvest looks to be minimal from this first planting. Much of it suffered from the heavy rains. We can only hope that the second planting will have time to recover. Unfortunately, no salad greens as of yet. Most have rotted away. We hope to perhaps salvage a second cutting on some of the greens by cutting and composting what is in the field now, but the salad mix and spinach are gone. Luckily we did plant the late fall head lettuce in the hoophouse, after removing the tomatoes, and that is growing fine.

We are very glad that we grow such a diverse array of crops, and in successions, so that we can still provide you, our members, with shares of produce each week. And we are also thankful that you participate in the farming experience with us, sharing both the hardships and the bounty provided by Mother Nature.

 

THE HARVEST

New – Bok Choy

New –Delicata Squash

 Potatoes

Garlic

Red Onions

Tomatoes

Sweet Peppers

CHOICE: Kale, Beets, Eggplant, Broccoli

Upick:  Fresh herbs & flowers, Hot Peppers, Cherry & Paste tomatoes, Raspberries, Edamame

Coming Soon: Leeks, Butternut Squash

 

RECIPES

Recipe ideas for the two new veggies for this week, Bok Choy and Delicata Squash, are up on the site. Bok Choy recipes are Garlic Bok Choy, and Farmers’ Market Greens with Shitake-Ginger Sauce. Delicata Squash recipes include Chili Brown Sugar Delicata Squash with Pears, Roasted Delicata Squash with Onions, Baked Winter Squash with Apples, and Delicata Squash and Gruyere Dip.  Check the Recipe page. Enjoy!

 

IMPORTANT REMINDER!!!

CSA pickup will be held on Thursday, Sept. 15 this week, instead of Friday Sept. 16th.  Hours are still 2-7 pm. Fruit shares will be delivered Thursday as well. Please contact Aimee to make other arrangements if you are a Friday person and cannot pick up your share on Thursday. The pickup day is being moved to accommodate the Rodale Institute Organic Pioneers Award Dinner on Friday, Sept. 16th. Thank you.

RODALE INSTITUTE APPLE FEST!

The Apple Festival is being held this Saturday. This fun family-friendly event has lots to offer. Go to www.rodaleinstitute.org to learn more about the Apple Festival and/or The Organic Pioneers Awards Dinner.

Posted 9/5/2011 3:13pm by John and Aimee Good.

FARM NEWS

More rain and more rain; this has been a season of extremes. We had an extremely wet spring, followed by an extremely dry summer, and as we head into fall we are again experiencing extremely wet weather. All this rain causes many problems on the farm, including washing of seeds, rotting of tender greens and roots, and increased spread of diseases, mold, and fungus. The losses suffered from Hurricane Irene include the entire first two plantings of leaf lettuce, as well as the first planting of spinach. We have replanted the last seedings, but we cannot recover the time lost, as the greens take at least 30-40 days from seeding to harvest. If these conditions continue we may lose more, so we are hopeful that the weather pattern will shift.

We have a limited harvest this week, due to the quick ending of the summer fruiting crops like cucumbers and zucchini, and the loss of the early plantings of greens. We hope to have some bok choy and  arugula to harvest next week. We are also bringing in the winter squash to cure in the greenhouse. We will begin distributing the Delicatas next week, which are beautiful, some of the nicest Delicatas we have ever grown! So please bear with us through this trying time and enjoy what we are able to provide from the fields. We still have a nice tomato and pepper harvest this week!


THE HARVEST

Potatoes

Garlic

Sweet Onions

Tomatoes

Sweet Peppers

CHOICE: Kale, Beets, Eggplant

Upick:  Fresh herbs & flowers, Hot Peppers, Cherry & Paste tomatoes, Raspberries

Coming Soon: Bok Choy, Delicata Squash, Edamame

 

RECIPES

Two new recipes for this week: Stuffed Red Bell Peppers; and Orzo with Green Beans, Tomatoes, and Feta. Check the recipe page. Enjoy!

 

HAPPY LABOR DAY!!!

Posted 8/29/2011 8:08pm by John and Aimee Good.

FARM NEWS

I imagine you are all wondering how the farm fared from our encounter with Hurricane Irene. Well the good news is that the hoophouse is still standing, as are the summer crops of tomatoes, etc. We did get over five inches of rain, and the fields are swampy. Our main concern now is the young fall crops which we have been seeding and planting every week in August: the tender young seedlings of lettuce, arugula, spinach, turnips, radishes, etc. We are hopeful that not too many seeds and seedlings, and topsoil, were lost due to washing. The farm crew did cover all the young crops with row covers to provide further resistance to the washing. The covers were secured with MANY pegs to keep them from blowing away. Luckily, most of the covers stayed down. We will keep you posted on the progress of the crops as things dry out and we are able to take the covers back up and evaluate everything.

A farmer’s note on this year’s crop of paste tomatoes: We did in fact plant 150 more row feet of paste tomatoes, which is a bed and a half more than last year. However the plants did not yield as well this year. The first fruits had a high incidence of blossom end rot, most likely due to uneven watering in the drought conditions this summer.  Also, all the field tomatoes seem to have “come in” later than normal, perhaps due to a slower start this spring, and unfortunately the peak of production is coinciding with an onslaught of rain, which causes cracking in the fruits. Luckily this shortage of paste tomatoes has been balanced by a very long season of tomatoes overall, with the combination from the hoophouse and field plants, as well as great yields from the field plants these past few weeks, as they are reaching their peak of production.

 

THE HARVEST

Potatoes

Garlic

Sweet Onions

 Eggplant

Cucumbers

Zucchini & Summer Squash

Tomatoes

Sweet Peppers

CHOICE: Carrots& Melons

Kale  - hopefully!

Upick:  Fresh herbs & flowers, Hot Peppers, Cherry & Paste tomatoes, Raspberries

NOTE: The raspberries and tomatoes may be rough for a week after this storm, but hopefully will recover soon. Bear with us. Thanks.

Coming Soon: Green Beans & Edamame

 

RECIPES

New inspiration for tomatoes this week includes Tomato Pie and Tomato Galette.  Also a simple Spanish Rice recipe, as well as a tasty recipe for Roasted Eggplant Rolls. Please see the Recipes page to view.

Another member-contributed recipe is yummy yellow squash muffins - a great way to get picky kids to eat yellow squash:  http://www.tasteofhome.com/Recipes/Yellow-Squash-Muffins Thanks!

 

PRESERVING THE HARVEST

Many fruiting crops tend to have an “ebb and flow” type of harvest, where there is a small picking initially, then steady for a while, followed by a peak where you are overwhelmed by the crop. Tomatoes and red peppers are peaking right now, and the beauty of this cycle is that it allows us to put up the extra for the winter. Freezing excess tomatoes and peppers could not be easier. Simply freeze whole or quartered tomatoes in freezer bags, squeezing out excess air. When thawed, you can slip skins from tomatoes and use for soups and stews. Peppers can be just chopped or sliced and frozen raw, and the texture and flavor will be great, but to preserve the most nutrients, peppers should be blanched. Steam pepper chunks or slices for 1-2 minutes, then dip in ice water to cool, then dry. Pack into freezer bags and squeeze out excess air. Such a sweet tasty treat for winter soups!

(Tomatoes, as a fruit, do not need to be blanched before freezing.)

Posted 8/22/2011 3:04pm by John and Aimee Good.

FARM NEWS

Row covers are used extensively on an organic farm, and we have a love/hate relationship with them. They are wonderful tools to keep pests off a crop, as well as to hold in warmth and moisture to extend the season for crops. But they are a lot of work to put down and take up, they must be moved to cultivate (weed) the crop several times, high winds can rip them, and weeds usually grow better under them, because they trap moisture on the surface, allowing for more weed seed germination.


Nevertheless, they are a very useful tool, and really our only defense against flea beetles, which eat all brassica crops and some solanaceous crops (they love eggplant).  Without row covers, all the baby greens would be full of tiny little holes, and the eggplant would never get a chance to grow. John and a former apprentice did devise a clever tool to make them easier to roll up, as you can see in the picture.

 



THE HARVEST

Potatoes

Melons – nearing the end of the season

Garlic

Sweet Onions

 Eggplant

Cucumbers

Zucchini & Summer Squash

Tomatoes

Sweet Peppers

Carrots

Possible Sweet Corn – nearing the end of the season

Upick:  Fresh herbs & flowers, Hot Peppers, Cherry & Paste tomatoes, Raspberries

Coming Soon: Green Beans, Kale

 

RECIPES

A member request for a pickle recipe had me going into my recipe file, and so I have put some old summertime favorites on the website this week, such as Red Pepper Bisque, Watermelon Aqua Fresca, and several refrigerator pickle recipes. Also, as the bounty of summer’s harvest lends itself to preserving, I have added my Roasted Tomato Pasta Sauce and Salsa recipes. You can always scale them down to make everyday amounts. But roasting the tomatoes intensifies the flavor and cooks off the extra juice, so that you have a very chunky pasta sauce quickly. By pureeing the roasted tomatoes, there is also no need to skin the tomatoes. Check the recipe page on the website to view. Enjoy!


FARM NEWS: Important Reminder!!!

The CSA pickup hours are 2-7 pm on both Tuesday and Friday. This means that CSA pickup is over at 7 pm.  Please arrive at least 15 minutes prior to closing to get your share. You may Upick after closing time. Thank you kindly for your consideration.

Posted 8/15/2011 2:40pm by John and Aimee Good.

FARM NEWS

Cloudy skies abound lately. The farm crew heads back to the barn  crew, after morning harvest, under a rain-threatening sky. Bike travel is great on the farm, although we still need the truck to bring in all the vegetables, especially those heavy loads of melons!

It seems that rain begets rain. The drought is over and we are now in a wet period. Well, the water will benefit the young fall crops that we are seeding weekly now; such as lettuce, greens, radishes, turnips, and all the fall crops planted last month; beets, carrots, broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, and kale.

The season is a cycle, from cool crops in June to the fruits of summer, and then returning to cool crops in the fall. And each season suits our body’s needs. It makes sense to eat lots of watery fruits and vegetables in the summer, when it is hot and our bodies are thirsty. And it feels right to eat more substantial, hearty roots in the fall, when we need more warmth and tummy-filling in the cool weather. Also the immune-boosting greens of autumn help to protect us from colds. I guess all this rain and cool weather is putting me in mind of fall. But we still have a few more weeks of summer, and lots of summer veggies to enjoy!              

THE HARVEST

Potatoes

Melons (Cantaloupe &/or Honeydew)

Watermelons (Red & Yellow)

Fresh Garlic

Sweet Onions

 Eggplant

Cucumbers

Zucchini & Summer Squash

Tomatoes

Sweet Italia peppers

Carrots

Sweet Corn

Upick:  Edamame! Fresh herbs & flowers. Hot Peppers. Cherry & Paste tomatoes

 

RECIPES

Thanks to our members and Heidi for contributing recipes this week! Check the Recipe page for North Indian Stuffed Eggplant, Lentil Salad with Cumin-Lime Vinaigrette, Cucumber Gazpacho, and Cantaloupe Bread.  Enjoy!

 

FARM PICS

A view of what is coming in September . . .


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The Good Farm is a certified organic farm raising vegetables, berries, flowers, and herbs for over 200 "farm share" members. Farmers John and Aimee Good specialize in providing the best quality and most flavorful varieties of the vegetables you love to eat- the staples! We have happy members - over 70% return every year!

 

Our customers say they eat healthier, feel better, save money, become inspired cooks, and even lose weight by joining the farm. Experience the joy of putting a delicious meal on the table by your own two hands. It's easy when the ingredients are this fresh and this good.

 

Support a type of farm that you can believe in; the kind you imagined as a child; where people pick the produce by hand, the soils are thriving, and the fields are full of life.

 

Become a CSA member today, it's the gift to yourself that keeps giving back! 

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8112 Church Rd.
Germansville, PA 18053
484-262-0675
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