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Posted 6/4/2018 4:15pm by John and Aimee Good.

 

I love the spring kale varieties, White Russian and Red Russian are so tender and delicious. My favorite is to just saute them with a little onion or garlic and top with soy sauce and/or balsamic vinegar, but kale salads are very delicious too, and quite popular right now.

Check out this link for 12 great Kale Salad recipes!

https://cookieandkate.com/2014/12-favorite-kale-salads/

 

Bok choy is one of my favorite greens. I love the crunchy, juicy stems combined with the tender, mild greens. It is best to stir-fry it quickly so it still has some crunch, or wilt it into soups, like coconut milk soups, miso soups, or chicken soups. Here is my favorite way to cook bok choy:

Garlic ginger bok choy

1-2 heads bok choy, stems separated and washed well

1-2 cloves garlic, minced

1-2 Tbsp. olive oil

1-2 tsp. fresh ginger, grated or minced

soy sauce to taste

Optional: toasted sesame oil, or hot sauce

 

Chop stems and leaves of bok choy, keeping stems in one pile and leaves in another.

Heat olive oil in saucepan over medium heat. Add garlic and ginger and swirl for 1-2 minutes. Add bok choy stems and cook, stirring constantly, for a few minutes, until they soften a bit. Add leaves and cook for another few minutes, until leaves are wilted. Add soy sauce to taste. Drizzle with a little toasted sesame oil and/or hot sauce if desired. Enjoy!

 

I have recently fallen in love with Israeli couscous. It is delicious, cooks quickly, and has a lovely mouth feel. I like to toast it in a large saute pan with a mix of veggies and then add broth or water and simmer until tender. One-pot meal! But this Salad is delicious as well. . .

Roasted Hakurei Turnips with Israeli Couscous Salad
(makes 3-4 servings)

1 bunch hakurei turnips with fresh-looking greens
1 cup Israeli couscous
1 garlic clove, minced
pinch of optional red chili flakes
1/4 cup chopped red onion, or minced scallion
juice from half a lemon
4-5 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
salt and pepper to taste

Preheat oven to 425 degrees. Trim turnips from greens leaving a small stub of the stems attached. Wash both well to remove dirt. Halve each turnip, keeping the long tails intact. Finely chop the greens.

Toss the turnips with 1-2 tablespoons of olive oil, pinches of salt and pepper, and the optional chili flakes. Place flat side-down on a roasting pan. Roast for 5-10 minutes, or just until the bottoms are lightly browned. Toss around in the pan with tongs, and continue roasting another 3-5 minutes. Remove from heat and let cool.

Meanwhile, bring a pot of 3 cups water to a bowl and add the couscous. Continue to boil for 8-10 minutes until couscous is tender. Drain.

Heat 1-2 tablespoons of olive oil over medium-high flame and add the garlic. Once fragrant, toss in the leaves and a pinch of salt and pepper. Sautee until just wilted, 1-2 minutes. Transfer to a bowl and let cool.

Combine the chopped onion or scallion with the cooled couscous and greens. Add fresh lemon juice, an extra tablespoon or so of olive oil, and salt and pepper to taste. Serve with the roasted turnips on top.

 

*Adapted from http://noteatingoutinny.com/2012/06/06/roasted-haruki-turnips-with-israeli-couscous-salad/

And here is a few more ideas for Hakurei turnips. I like eating them raw in thin slices, or grating them for salads. We often saute them right with their greens, with a bit of crispy bacon on top. But  recipe below is Farmer John's favorite.  And the Cream of Turnip soup was made by a farm-to-table restaurant we work with - amazing!

Butter-browned turnips

1 bunch turnips, scrubbed

1-2 Tbsp. butter

sea salt

Optional additions: sugar snap peas (de-stemmed & cut in half), kale, turnip greens

 

Remove tops and roots from turnips and cut into 1/2 inch wedges. Melt butter in a heavy skillet over medium heat. Once melted, add turnips and sprinkle with sea salt. Cover with a lid and cook for about 5 mintutes. Remove lid. Turnips should be browned on the bottom, but not burnt. Keep heat on medium and stir turnips for a few minutes to brown other sides slightly. If desired, add 2 handfuls of sugar snap peas, or 2 cups chopped kale or turnip greens, and cook uncovered 2 minutes more. Serve and enjoy.

Cream of Turnip Soup

2 T. butter

1 bunch turnips, cut into chunks

1 onion, sliced

2 cloves garlic, minced

1 quart chicken or veg. broth

1/2 cup white wine, or more broth

1 medium potato, peeled and cut into chunks

1 cup half and half or light cream

1/2 tsp. salt

ground black pepper

1/4 tsp. ground nutmeg (optional)

1 T. olive oil

thinly sliced turnip greens or spinach, about 2-3 cups (optional)

In soup pot over medium heat, melt butter. Add onion and saute until translucent. Add garlic and saute for one minute more. Add wine and boil until reduced by half. Add turnips, broth, and potato. Bring to boil and then reduce to simmer. Cook for about 20-25 minutes, until veggies are tender. Remove from heat. Add cream and seasonings. Puree with immersion blender. Serve as is or continue below.

OPTIONAL: In a skillet, heat oil over medium heat. Add thinly sliced turnip greens or spinach and cook, stirring, until wilted. Top each bowl of soup with a dollop of turnip greens or spinach.

 




Your farmers,

John and Aimee Good

The Good Farm

8112 Church Road

Germansville PA 18053

484-262-0675

www.goodfarmcsa.com

facebook.com/goodfarmcsa

instagram.com/goodfarmcsa

Posted 6/4/2018 3:46pm by John and Aimee Good.

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The 2018 CSA harvest season begins!

Your first CSA pickup is TOMORROW!

Tuesday June 5th at the farm, between the hours of 1pm and 6 pm. We ask that you arrive at least 15 minutes prior to closing, if possible, to allow time to gather your share. The farm address is:

8112 Church Road

Germansville PA 18053

*Please note, if using GPS, it will take you about 1/2 mile down the road. Please watch the mailbox numbers to find us,  and look for our farm sign by the road.

 

June is the month of greens! Fresh spring greens are the perfect cleansing and nutritious food after the winter. Green salads, soups, and more coming your way!

THE HARVEST

Salad mix Our special salad mix is cut from mini heads of multi-leaf (very dense) lettuces, for the best flavor, texture, crunch, and keeping quality!

Kale Wash leaves. Cut or strip out center rib. Stack leaves and chop in thin ribbons. Saute with garlic and olive oil, add a splash of balsamic vinegar and serve. Or try the new favorite - Kale Chips - even our kids gobble them up!(Click link. Then type into search box on recipe page to find!)

Bok choy Separate leaves by cutting off stem and wash thoroughly. Chop stems and greens. Cook stems first, until just crisp-tender, then add greens and cook only until wilted.Delicious sauteed with ginger and garlic, or olive oil, lemon, and salt (my favorite). It is also great in broth-based soups such as Miso or Chicken noodle soup. 

Hakurei turnips  (pictured here, prior to washing. Don't worry, yours will be clean!)  This special Asian variety of turnip is quite mild and almost sweet. Slice thinly for salad or stir-fry. To roast in the oven: cut into halves or quarter, toss with olive oil and salt, and bake at 425 for about 20 minutes, until tender. Roasting carmelizes the sugars in the turnips and is a real treat. The greens are also delicious. I like to saute them with onion and bacon. Lots of recipes on our page for turnips. Enter "turnip" into the search box.

Greens Choice: Asian spinach**, spinach

**Asian spinach is an asian green with a mild flavor and taste similar to spinach. I like to mix it with the lettuce mix for salads. You can also cook it like as you would spinach. Unlike spinach, it does not have oxalic acid and people who have a hard time with raw spinach can usually handle Asian spinach well.

Coming Soon: Scallions, Arugula, Radishes, Napa Cabbage

Upick: Strawberries, parsley - check UPick board for amounts!  Reminder: Please bring scissor for herbs and containers to transfer your berries into to take home. Thanks!

*Strawberry picking will be the flag system - read instructions on UPick board and ask for help if needed! You start at an orange marker, pick in the direction listed on the board. Move the orange marker to where you finish your box/es. Thanks!

 

*COOPERATIVE SHARES: Cheese, eggs, bread shares this week! Please check off your name on the appropriate sign-in sheet and retrieve your shares from the cooler or display hutch. Please ask if you need help!

 

CSA EXTRAS: New this year! Every week we will post a list of any vegetable items that would be available to purchase extra. Look on the sign-in table for weekly items and prices. We are trying this based on members' requests last year and in surveys. Let us know how it works, and if it helps your meal planning for picnics and special events!

 

PLEASE NOTE:

*Still time to sample and sign up for extra shares:  Breads from the Daily Loaf, Cheeses from Valley Milkhouse, and Fruit from County Line Orchard, organic pastured eggs from Spring Creek Farm. 

You can sign up in the barn or by updating your membership. Bread, cheese, and eggs will be pro-rated, as they start this week. Cheese is biweekly, bread and eggs are weekly. Fruit will begin in July, and mushroom shares will be offered this fall. Enjoy!

*Local goods available for purchase: Good Farm salsa, pasta sauce and ketchup, grassfed beef, organic pastured eggs, Wild Alaskan salmon, local yogurt and butter, local honey. Cheeses, maple syrup, locally roasted coffee, and more meats coming soon! 

 

*If you missed the CSA Pickup Instructions Email last week, please read below. Thanks! We look forward to seeing you all tomorrow!

Driveway/Parking Instructions: At the turn onto our driveway, you will cross a small drainage ditch. Please be careful when crossing. Only one car can cross this at a time! Our driveway is long and narrow. If two cars need to pass, please use the grass lanes on either side of the drive as pull-off areas. Main parking is in the gravel lot directly in front of the barn. Extra parking is in the grass lot across the driveway from the barn, directly in front of the Upick garden.

Pickup Instructions: Please enter barn through the side door. Please check off next to your name on the "sign-in sheet" every week you pick up your share. Your share members are  %%member-label%%. If this is a shared membership, you must alternate weekly pickups or meet at the farm at the same time to split your share weekly.

Your share types for 2018 season are: %%member-types-text%%. We will have sign-in sheets for all "extra shares" which must be checked off before pickup, if applicable. (We will also take signups for extra shares, including bread, eggs, fruit and cheese, the first two weeks of CSA pickup. You can sample products and sign up in the barn!)

All the vegetables will be in the barn, with signs indicating the amount each share size is allowed to take. Scales are available for weighing produce where required. We ask that members bring their own bags and/or containers to take home their produce each week. We do have a box of extra bags available for those who forget, and you can bring your extra plastic bags here for other members to re-use.

Our wonderful CSA helper Heidi Cooper will be on hand to help you and answer any questions!

The Upick garden will be open soon with berries, peas and herbs - watch your emails and the Upick board in the barn!

Extra products will be available for purchase by members in the CSA pickup barn, all local and naturally raised: Good Farm salsa, pasta sauce, and ketchup; local honey, eggs, bread, cheeses, yogurts, and grassfed beef, Wild Alaskan salmon, and more! Cash or check only.

Please Note! The Good Farm is a working family farm. For the safety of all, we ask that members and their children stay within the barn area and Upick gardens, and that dogs be on a leash at all times.  Members are welcome to walk the fields by request. Thank you!

Member updates: Please keep an eye on your inbox every week for the harvest update. You will receive a weekly email, beginning next Monday evening, with a list of the vegetables which will be in your share, as well as storage and cooking tips, recipe ideas, and news from the farm.

 

Thanks! We look forward to seeing you all next week!

First vegetables will include lettuce mix, spinach, bok choy, kale, Hakurei turnips or radishes, and possibly scallions.  Berries may be ready to U- pick! Can't wait!

Some Important Links to Remember:

CSA Pickup Hours  - lists hours for all pickup sites, as well as Upick times

CSA Pickup Changes - you can login to your member account with your email address to change contact info, check your balance, make a payment, schedule a vacation hold and double pickup, switch to a different pickup day or location for a week, etc. (To permanently change your pickup location, you need to contact Aimee.)

News & Blog - Missed an email? Want to review an old one? You can find all our email posts here in our blog archive.

Recipes - Every week we post new recipes highlighting the vegetables in your share. Most recent additions will be at the top of the page, but we have quite a lot of recipes on this page, and you can search by vegetable to find many more ideas!



Your farmers,

John and Aimee Good

The Good Farm

8112 Church Road

Germansville PA 18053

484-262-0675

www.goodfarmcsa.com

facebook.com/goodfarmcsa

instagram.com/goodfarmcsa

Posted 5/29/2018 3:14pm by John and Aimee Good.

%%user-firstname%%,

Welcome to the start of the 2018 CSA harvest season! Please read the CSA pickup instructions below thoroughly, so you know what to do next week!

Your first CSA pickup is Wednesday June 6th, %%pickup-title%%. Your pickup location is %%pickup-location%%. The pickup times are %%pickup-time%%.

Pickup Instructions: Your share members are  %%member-label%%. If this is a shared membership, you must alternate weekly pickups.

Your share types for 2018 season are: %%member-types-text%%. Please check off next to your name on the "sign-in sheet" each week. Share boxes are labeled as Small, with green labels, or Regular, with blue labels.

Please take the correct size share, as listed on the "sign-in sheet"!

We ask that members open the re-usable boxes by folding the tabs gently and carefully, not ripping, so that we can re-use them for the entire season. We will send specific instructions on opening the boxes next week.

Each box has a liner bag inside. You can simply remove the liner bag with all the vegetables inside and carry it out that way, or transfer the liner bag with veggies inside to your own tote bag, basket, or other container. CSA boxes can then be folded flat and left at the pickup location, for the farmers to pick up and re-use. The liner bag makes a great storage bag for larger green veggies, such as kale bunches and Napa cabbage heads, in your fridge!

Extra shares, if ordered, will be in the green cooler, labeled with your last name. The sign-in sheet will list any extra shares for your membership. Please be sure your extra shares are listed on the sign-in sheet, and please be sure to take only extra shares labeled with your name!

Member updates: Please keep an eye on your inbox every week for the harvest update. You will receive a weekly email, beginning next Monday evening, with a list of the vegetables which will be in your share, as well as storage and cooking tips, recipe ideas, and news from the farm.

Thanks! We look forward to feeding you next week and for many weeks to come!

First vegetables will include lettuce mix, salad greens, Hakurei turnips, bok choy, kale, and radishes. Berries are coming soon! Can't wait!

Some Important Links to Remember:

CSA Pickup Hours  - lists location and hours for all pickup sites, pickup instructions for delivery sites, as well as Upick times

CSA Pickup Changes - you can login to your member account with your email address to change contact info, check your balance, make a payment, schedule a vacation hold and double pickup, switch to a different pickup day or location for a week, etc. (To permanently change your pickup location, you need to contact Aimee.)

News & Blog - Missed an email? Want to review an old one? You can find all our email posts here in our blog archive.

Recipes - Every week we post new recipes highlighting the vegetables in your share. Most recent additions will be at the top of the page, but we have quite a lot of recipes on this page, and you can search by vegetable to find many more ideas!


Your farmers,

John and Aimee Good

The Good Farm

8112 Church Road

Germansville PA 18053

484-262-0675

www.goodfarmcsa.com

facebook.com/goodfarmcsa

instagram.com/goodfarmcsa

Posted 5/29/2018 2:50pm by John and Aimee Good.


 %%user-firstname%% ,

Welcome to the start of the 2018 CSA harvest season! Please read the CSA pickup instructions below thoroughly, so you know what to do next week!

Your first CSA pickup is Tuesday June 5th at the farm, between the hours of 1pm and 6 pm. We ask that you arrive at least 15 minutes prior to closing, if possible, to allow time to gather your share. The farm address is:

8112 Church Road

Germansville PA 18053

*Please note, if using GPS, it will take you about 1/2 mile down the road. Please watch the mailbox numbers to find us.

Driveway/Parking Instructions: At the turn onto our driveway, you will cross a small drainage ditch. Please be careful when crossing. Only one car can cross this at a time! Our driveway is long and narrow. If two cars need to pass, please use the grass lanes on either side of the drive as pull-off areas. Main parking is in the gravel lot directly in front of the barn. Extra parking is in the grass lot across the driveway from the barn, directly in front of the Upick garden.

Pickup Instructions: Please enter barn through the side door. Please check off next to your name on the "sign-in sheet" every week you pick up your share. Your share members are  %%member-label%%. If this is a shared membership, you must alternate weekly pickups or meet at the farm at the same time to split your share weekly.

Your share types for 2018 season are: %%member-types-text%%. We will have sign-in sheets for all "extra shares" which must be checked off before pickup, if applicable. (We will also take signups for extra shares, including bread, eggs, fruit and cheese, the first two weeks of CSA pickup. You can sample products and sign up in the barn!)

All the vegetables will be in the barn, with signs indicating the amount each share size is allowed to take. Scales are available for weighing produce where required. We ask that members bring their own bags and/or containers to take home their produce each week. We do have a box of extra bags available for those who forget, and you can bring your extra plastic bags here for other members to re-use.

Our wonderful CSA helper Heidi Cooper will be on hand to help you and answer any questions!

The Upick garden will be open soon with berries, peas and herbs - watch your emails and the Upick board in the barn!

Extra products will be available for purchase by members in the CSA pickup barn, all local and naturally raised: Good Farm salsa, pasta sauce, and ketchup; local honey, eggs, bread, cheeses, yogurts, and grassfed beef, Wild Alaskan salmon, and more! Cash or check only.

Please Note! The Good Farm is a working family farm. For the safety of all, we ask that members and their children stay within the barn area and Upick gardens, and that dogs be on a leash at all times.  Members are welcome to walk the fields by request. Thank you!

Member updates: Please keep an eye on your inbox every week for the harvest update. You will receive a weekly email, beginning next Monday evening, with a list of the vegetables which will be in your share, as well as storage and cooking tips, recipe ideas, and news from the farm.

 

Thanks! We look forward to seeing you all next week!

First vegetables will include lettuce mix, spinach, bok choy, kale, Hakurei turnips or radishes, and possibly scallions.  Berries may be ready to U- pick! Can't wait!

Some Important Links to Remember:

CSA Pickup Hours  - lists hours for all pickup sites, as well as Upick times

CSA Pickup Changes - you can login to your member account with your email address to change contact info, check your balance, make a payment, schedule a vacation hold and double pickup, switch to a different pickup day or location for a week, etc. (To permanently change your pickup location, you need to contact Aimee.)

News & Blog - Missed an email? Want to review an old one? You can find all our email posts here in our blog archive.

Recipes - Every week we post new recipes highlighting the vegetables in your share. Most recent additions will be at the top of the page, but we have quite a lot of recipes on this page, and you can search by vegetable to find many more ideas!

 

Your farmers,

John and Aimee Good

The Good Farm

8112 Church Road

Germansville PA 18053

484-262-0675

www.goodfarmcsa.com

www.facebook.com/goodfarmcsa

www.instagram.com/goodfarmcsa

Posted 5/18/2018 2:32pm by John and Aimee Good.

CSA Pickups set to begin the first full week of June! Less than 3 weeks away. We hope you are getting excited!

SPRING CROPS:

We are excited to see a big jump in the growth of all the spring crops we planted last month.

April was so windy and dry, that although this is a lot of rain, it is quite a benefit to the crops. I swear the snap peas seemed to grow about 3 inches overnight!

Here we are pounding stakes to trellis the peas, which can grow up to 4-5' tall. From right to left, farm apprentice David Darling, farmer John, and farm apprentice Megan Sonier. We were all building muscles that day!

BIG STORM:

We were not excited however, to see every single row cover on the farm, which had been  covering all the tender young crops, get twisted and blown away in the crazy windstorm on Tuesday night.

It took 5 of us all morning long, in the pouring rain of course, to drag them back, untwist them, and re-pin them in the fields Wednesday morning. Never before have we seen every single one get blown away in a single storm.

Ahh, farming. Always full of joys and heartaches, or muscle aches, as the case may be.

SUMMER CROPS:

Planting, planting, planting! This wet cool weather has been great for planting. No stress at all for the plants.

This week we put out a half acre of winter squash, as well as watermelons and muskmelons, field tomatoes, head lettuce, flowers, herbs, and more.

We had to lose our boots and just go barefoot at times, as the mud was clinging to our boots, making them so heavy! Luckily the shale in our soils is mostly small pieces.

Next week we will put out all the peppers and eggplant, as well as the first planting of sweet corn! The corn plants (pictured here) look beautiful and are ready to move on from the greenhouse to the field.

This is such an exciting time of year, as we plant out most of the entire farm, full of promise and expectation of the coming harvest.

We look forward to beginning the journey of this harvest season with you in just a few short weeks!

 

Your farmers,

John and Aimee Good

The Good Farm

www.goodfarmcsa.com

8112 Church Road

Germansville PA 18053

484-262-0675

facebook.com/goodfarmcsa

instagram.com/goodfarmcsa

Posted 5/4/2018 3:00pm by John and Aimee Good.




I definitely get the dinner doldrums, near the end of winter, when we are still eating the same root vegetables that we have been eating since November. I end up making the same meals over and over again, and find myself getting bored in the kitchen.

But I know that when spring comes, the CSA season will soon begin, and I will not be wondering,  "what should I make for dinner?"

The vegetables tell me what to make for dinner! I get so excited to wash, chop, and cook the beautiful fresh farm veggies.  (OK, maybe not the washing part, but definitely the chopping and cooking!) And I just use the vegetables as the starting point for all my meals.

In June, when fresh greens and berries are abundant, we enjoy lots of salads, changing up the dressings and extras. Stir-fry is a great quick dinner, using the fresh broccoli, scallions, zucchini and greens; changing up the sauces (soy-ginger, spicy peanut, sweet & sour) and the proteins (shrimp, chipped beef, crispy tofu) and the starch (rice, wide rice noodles, soba noodles) keeps it interesting.

But the spring farm season is short, really just June, and then the summertime is here, and the cooking is easy! Big fat tomato sandwiches, crisp cucumber salads, grilled zucchini, luscious sweet corn, juicy melons. Can't wait!

I don't know if this is making you hungry, but it is working on me.

The beauty of the CSA is that it is so simple. You are given a share of the harvest. Period. What comes with this is a free gift: creativity and inspiration in the kitchen, the satisfaction of an amazing meal. And it is really not so hard to get from raw vegetables to an amazing meal, because the quality of the ingredients is the foundation. Every good chef knows this.

 

Free yourself from the dinner doldrums. Experience farm-to-table eating from your own kitchen. Yes, you can do it, because it starts with the ingredients.

 

Weekly shares begin in June, just 1 month away! Only 20 spots left. . .

Learn more at www.goodfarmcsa.com.

Sign up here!

 

 

Your farmers,

John and Aimee Good

The Good Farm

www.goodfarmcsa.com

8112 Church Road

Germansville PA 18053

484-262-0675

Like us on Facebook!

Posted 5/4/2018 11:08am by John and Aimee Good.

Farmers love to talk about the weather. It is the ultimate deciding factor in our daily decisions. We consult the weather reports at least 3 times a day, in fact, often more. It is constantly changing, day to day and season to season. It has a huge impact on the crops we are raising, and we have no control over it. Yes, farmers need to talk about the weather. It is central to what we do.

The weather took us for a roller-coaster ride this week.

On Monday we were shivering in our flannels and ear warmers, planting 100 cedar tree saplings for a windbreak and living fence on the northeast side of the farm. They are just babies now, but in ten years we hope they will shelter the buildings from the winter winds.

 

 

Speaking of winds, the re-construction of the front of the barn (which was lifted and thrown in the crazy windstorm in March) has begun! We are very excited. We are enclosing the front right, which will be our veggie wash station. Barn entrance is on the left. Posts are spaced closer, and all posts are firmly anchored in poured concrete. Check out the progress thus far. . .

 

Back to the weather.  By the middle of the week we were setting up irrigation to water the hot and thirsty plants. (not to mention the hot and thirsty farmers. We tested it to make sure the water was cold and wet - it was!)

We set up the sprinkler system to water the young broccoli which we planted this week. They are covered with the mini-tunnels you see here of wire hoops and row covers, to protect them from pests such as the cabbage moth. Doing double duty, the covers also help protect from temperature extremes and conserve soil moisture. 

Strawberry plants began flowering this week! May berry flowers bring June berries! Looking forward to the start of the CSA harvest season in June!

 P.S. We started an instagram account - check us out at goodfarmcsa on instagram.

Your farmers,

John and Aimee Good

The Good Farm

www.goodfarmcsa.com

8112 Church Road

Germansville PA 18053

484-262-0675

Like us on Facebook!

Posted 4/20/2018 8:42am by John and Aimee Good.


Earth Day is today! And every day. 

The earth is the best home, and the only home, we’ve got. So we better take care of it!  

We are doing our best to improve the land and the soils here on our 18 acres. There is a lot of life sharing this space with us. Last season we saw baby grey tree frogs in the fields, as well as cecropia moths, luna moths, bats, foxes, hawks, bluebirds, killdeer, and many more creatures.

This spring John observed salamander larvae in the vernal pool in the woods, just at the edge of the lower fields, and we have heard spring peeper frogs, as well as toads singing nearby.  

Everything we do on the farm affects all the life sharing the land with us, not to mention the life in the soil. Underneath our feet millions of microbes, earthworms, nematodes and insects and others are at work; decomposing and creating organic matter, recycling nutrients, converting nutrients into usable forms for plants, aerating the soil and more.

 The soils on an organic farm are active and alive, and they are doing amazing things to help the planet. Organic soils can pull carbon out of the atmosphere, acting as a carbon sink, rather than a carbon source. According to the Rodale Institute’s research, “soil under organic agriculture management can accumulate about 1000 pounds of carbon per acre foot of soil each year”.  

Healthy soils can hold more water, reducing runoff and increasing filtration. For every 1% increase in soil organic matter, which is basically of measure of the microbial activity of the soil, the soil can hold 20,000 gallons more water per acre. That is pretty amazing. 

At the Good Farm we are constantly working to improve our soils. We use our land lightly, planting only one vegetable crop in a field per year, and planting cover crops (grasses, grains, and legumes) when the field is not in vegetable production, to protect the soil from erosion and to feed the soil microbes and increase organic matter.

We till using a spader, which maintains the soil layers rather than inverting them, and requires only one pass to go from covered ground to seedbed, reducing the amount of tillage needed overall.

Every year we apply compost to all the fields, to increase fertility and organic matter. We are growing healthy soils, and healthy soils grow nutrient-dense vegetables, which taste better and make us feel better, stronger, and more alive. Our bodies know what we need!

And when we work with nature, it is better for us all.  

We are proud to be organic farmers, working with nature.  

Thank you for supporting this good work! Happy Earth Day!


 

Your farmers,

John and Aimee Good

The Good Farm

www.goodfarmcsa.com

8112 Church Road

Germansville PA 18053

484-262-0675

Like us on Facebook!

Posted 4/17/2018 9:51am by John and Aimee Good.

PLANTING UPDATE: We were finally able to start putting plants out into the fields last week, and boy did we plant! It was a trial by fire for our new farm apprentices, Megan Sonier and David Darling, and they definitely stretched the planting muscles!

Fighting frozen soils last Monday morning, we hand-tranplanted 2000 broccoli and cabbage plants.

We use the water-wheel transplanter that you see here, to create a nice wet hole, into which the riders place each plant and then cover with soil, as the tractor driver, usually John or I, very slowly pulls the machine down the bed. The mechanical transplanter really enhances the success of the transplants, and saves some time and back muscles for the farmers!

Farmer Aimee and apprentice Megan are planting this bed, pictured above, with the first lettuce of the season. These plants look quite happy!

The cabbage and broccoli had a rough week. They were covered by snow last Monday night, and then baked in a summer sun by the weekend! The first broccoli planting often gets a tough time from the weather extremes of early April. It gets snowed on most years. But it always seems to rebound and gives us broccoli in early June! We do always protect these early brassica crops with row covers, which help with the temperature extremes, as well as conserve soil moisture, and exclude pests.

In addition to the lettuce, cabbage and broccoli; we put out 3600 red beet transplants, as well as 8500 total onion plugs, each of which contains about 3 onion plants or 6 scallion plants (we seed them in clusters); including yellow and red storage onions,  sweet yellow and white onions, as well mini red onions and scallions. And we are not finished with the alliums yet! We plan to put out about 2500 leek plants later this week!

We are excited to be off to a great start with the planting season, preparing for a great CSA harvest to come!

MEMBERSHIP UPDATE: Only 20 spots remaining for the 2018 season. If you haven't done so already, time to reserve your share!

KUTZTOWN PICKUP SITE: Someone is looking to split a small share at the Kutztown delivery site, alternating weekly pickups. Please let me know if you, or someone you know, may be interested!

 

Your farmers,

John and Aimee Good

The Good Farm

www.goodfarmcsa.com

8112 Church Road

Germansville PA 18053

484-262-0675

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Posted 4/6/2018 1:44pm by John and Aimee Good.

Tomato Surgery Time

Yes, we got out our razor blades and grafting clips, and proceeded to attempt to join two tomato plants into one: grafting.  Grafting has been used in orchards for a very long time. It has become more common in vegetable production in recent years.

The idea here is to graft a delicious fruiting variety onto a very hardy,  disease-resistant rootstock. The rootstock is a wild-type tomato, selected for it's vigor. Grafting the tomato plants that we will plant into the high tunnel allows for an early and long harvest of excellent tomatoes, with strong, healthy, disease-resistant plants.

In this photo you can see where we have just complete the side-graft cuts and the plants are clipped together while they heal. If you look at the plant in the middle, you can see the exact spot of the "join". We make precisely matching cuts, on about a 70 degree angle, downward in the rootstock and upwards in the scion, to "lock" the stems together. I was quite proud of this one! It held together before I even clipped it!

After surgery, the plants are placed in a healing chamber, protected from sunlight and wind, for 3 days. We mist them daily to keep the humidity high.  We will remove them from the healing chamber on the 4th night. Then we make a weaning cut, to partially sever the scion (top) from it's root. We add a bamboo stake to support the plant at this time. After a few days we then cut the scion from it's root completely.  By this time, the scion should have grown to connect completely to the rootstock for it's nutrient source.

At first I am  always nervous when we get the razors out and start to cut up our precious tomato plants we have been growing since February!  But after a while I really begin to enjoy the precision and technique of being a plant surgeon. Witnessing the ability of the plants to grow and thrive through the grafting process makes me realize the great resiliency of plants. They really do want to grow!

And we want to grow them for you! Looking forward to the start of the CSA season in June, we only have about 30 shares left. If you are not a member now, you can sign up today! Already a member? THANK YOU! Feel free to help spread the word. Earth Day is approaching, and joining a local, organic farm is a great way to be kind to the planet, and yourself!

 

Your farmers,

John and Aimee Good

The Good Farm

www.goodfarmcsa.com

8112 Church Road

Germansville PA 18053

484-262-0675

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The Good Farm is a certified organic farm raising vegetables, berries, flowers, and herbs for a CSA (Community Supported Agriculture) and farmer's market. Farmers John and Aimee Good specialize in providing the best quality and most flavorful varieties of the vegetables you love to eat- the staples! We have happy members - over 70% return every year!

 

Many customers say they eat healthier, feel better, learn to cook new things, save money, and even lose weight by joining the farm. We are all connected to farming, as we are all eaters. Experience seasonal eating. Support a type of farm that you can believe in; the kind you imagined as a child; where people pick the produce by hand, the soils are thriving, and the fields are full of life. Become a CSA member or visit The Good Farm at the Trexlertown Farmer's Market. Because "it's all GOOD!"

 

"Eating is an agricultural act" - Wendell Berry

8112 Church Rd.
Germansville, PA 18053
484-262-0675
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