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Posted 9/17/2012 4:29pm by John and Aimee Good.


FIELD UPDATE

A "fork" shaped cloud was sighted over the fields of Quiet Creek Farm! How appropriate! Our volunteer photographer this season, CSA member Julia Sams, captured this lovely photo, as well as many others featured in the weekly email updates. Julia is a student at Orefield Middle School and enjoys visiting the farm with her family. Thanks Julia!

New this week: Delicata Squash. These little beauties are exceptionally sweet, and unlike most other squashes, have tender skins which are easily eaten. So they are wonderful for stuffing. To cook winter squash, simply cut in half and scoop out seeds. (Save the seeds for roasting with olive oil and tamari - a delicious snack!) Roast at 350-400 for about 25-40 minutes, until they pierce tender with a fork. Turn upright and put butter and maple syrup into the cavity - scrumptious! Or put your favorite stuffing mixture: rice, mushrooms and veggies, cooked maple sausage and apples, etc. into the cavity and bake for 10 more minutes. Enjoy!


ORGANIC APPLE FESTIVAL THIS SATURDAY!

This Saturday, September 22nd, from 10 am to 5 pm,The Rodale Institute will be holding its annual Organic Apple Festival. Upick organic apples, crafts, games, and food will be available. This is a very fun event!


THE HARVEST

Delicata Squash- new!

Sweet Corn

Bok Choy

White Onions

Garlic

Sweet Peppers

Potatoes

Spinach or Leaf Lettuce

CHOICE: Zucchini, Tomatoes, Watermelon, Cabbage, Radishes


Upick: Hot Peppers, Raspberries, Basil, Cilantro, Dill, Flowers & Herbs

Coming Soon:  Red Beets, Broccoli


Recipes

I discovered a simple way to make Watermelon Popsicles this past week, which are deliciously refreshing. My children love them, and I do too!  Watermelon Salsa is a unique and tasty version of salsa.

Black Bean and Corn Salad combines sweet corn, black beans, fresh cilantro, basil, peppers, and more for a very flavorful side dish.

Pau Uhaji is an Indian curry using potatoes, tomatoes, and peas or green beans, as well as plenty of Indian spices.

Red Pepper Bisque (with optional Scallops or not) is one of my favorites; a creamy, red soup wonderful in late September with the abundance of peppers.


Enjoy the Harvest!

Your farmers,

John and Aimee Good


 

Posted 9/10/2012 3:44pm by John and Aimee Good.


FIELD UPDATE

It has been a good tomato season, and it is now nearly over. The paste tomatoes were extremely productive. We hope that you got the chance to put up some of these jewels for the winter; freezing or canning soup, sauce, salsa, quartered tomatoes, etc. Their flavor is wonderful in soups and stews in the cold months. This will probably be the last week for picking in the tomato patch. 

Another end of summer treat is in store for us: sweet corn! The sweet corn is grown by The Rodale Institute, since they already have all the big equipment, and we harvest it. Their first planting had very poor germination, and so they re-planted. This crop looks very good, and we are glad to have it. Organic fresh-picked sweet corn is hard to beat!

Finally it really feels like autumn, and it is so beautiful and refreshing. New on the fall menu is leeks, a very mild sweet onion. Chop finely and saute in plenty of butter; these are great in soups, over pasta, in rice pilaf, etc. The most famous Potato Leek Soup is always delicious as well.


THIS WEEK: PICKUP CHANGE NOTICE!

Please note: The CSA pickup for this Friday, September 14th will be moved to Thursday, September 13th, to accommodate the Rodale Institute Organic Pioneers Awards Dinner, which is being held on Friday in the barn. All Friday pickup members, please put this change on your calendar. If you cannot pick up on Thursday September 13th, please let us know right away. Also, fruit, bread, and chicken shares will delivered on Thursday. Thank you very much.


THE HARVEST

Leaf Lettuce

Sweet Corn

Leeks

Bok Choy or Kale

Watermelons

White Onions

Garlic

Peppers

Zucchini & Summer Squash - limited

Peppers

CHOICE: Eggplant, Potatoes, Tomatoes


Upick: Edamame, Hot Peppers, Basil, Paste Tomatoes, Raspberries, Herbs & Flowers


Coming Soon:  Delicata Squash, Radishes


Recipes

African Pineapple Peanut Stew is a very tasty, savory stew, which incorporates kale or other cooking greens. This unique recipe for Stuffed Peppers incorporates many of the vegetables in the share this week, including leeks, peppers, zucchini, and tomato.

Fresh sweet corn is such a treat, and although it is wonderful right off the cob, I always think fresh corn cakes are an amazing treat. Try this recipe for Golden Corncakes and see if you agree!


Enjoy the Harvest!

Your farmers,

John and Aimee Good


 

Posted 8/27/2012 1:01pm by John and Aimee Good.


FIELD UPDATE

The potato yields have been excellent this year, probably our best ever. We hope you have been enjoying the bounty of these tasty spuds. Because potatoes are a storage crop, it is often surprising to people how wonderful they are when fresh dug from the ground. We love them.

We expect to have tomatoes in the share, in lesser quantities, through this week yet. The cherries are almost gone, but it looks like the pastes will be available to Upick this week and hopefully next. The quantities should still be ample for this week, so take your last chance to stock up on these jewels of the summer!

I mistakenly thought we had harvested all the spring plantings of carrots, but happily, I was wrong and we have one more planting which will be in the harvest this week. Other exciting vegetables coming in the next few weeks include watermelons, leeks, salad greens and arugula.

The next edamame in the field look great, and there should be plenty to pick. Unfortunately the green beans have been hit hard by Mexican Bean Beetles this year. The little yellow larvae can be seen all over the plants, and they eat the foliage as well as the beans. They have dramatically reduced yields. They are usually not a problem in this region, but the recent warm winter has led to highly increased populations. In our research, we have discovered a beneficial wasp that we can release to help control the population, which we will do in future seasons, but it is too late to control the population that we have at present.


PICKUP CHANGE NOTICE!

Please note: The CSA pickup for Friday, September 14th will be moved to Thursday, September 13th, to accommodate the Rodale Institute Organic Pioneers Awards Dinner, which is being held on Friday in the barn. All Friday pickup members, please put this change on your calendar. If you cannot pick up on Thursday September 13th, please let us know that you need to Tuesday September 11th for that week. Also, fruit shares will delivered on Thursday for that week. Thank you very much.


THE HARVEST

Carrots

White Onions

Red  &/or Blue Potatoes

Fresh Garlic

Red Tomatoes

Heirloom Tomatoes

Zucchini & Summer Squash

Peppers

Kale or Chard

Limited: Eggplant


Upick: Edamame, Basil, Paste Tomatoes, Raspberries, limited Wax & Green Beans, limited Cherry Tomatoes, Hot Peppers, Herbs & Flowers


Coming Soon: Watermelon, Leeks, Salad greens, Arugula


Recipes

Since this morning is slightly rainy and overcast, I am thinking of soup. My mom served this Potato Chard Soup for lunch, and it was so delicious I wanted to share it with you. Even the children ate whole bowls of it! Another tasty chard recipe, also a kid-pleaser, is Chard Cheese Pie,a very simple baked dish with cottage or ricotta cheese and steamedgreens. In both recipes, kale or other cooking greens can be substituted for the chard or used in combination with the chard.

I also discovered another recipe for making Homemade Tomato Sauce which is very simple, as it involves blending the tomatoes and then cooking them down for several hours. I have made salsa using this method and I really like it.

I made this Zucchini Lasagna over the weekend, and everyone loved it. It is like a traditional lasagna, but the noodles are replaced by 1/4" thick slices of zucchini.

This recipe for POP Cakes (Potato-Onion-Pepper) not only has a great name, it looks scrumptios and fun! The cakes are made in a muffin tin, with sliced onion and pepper, and grated potato, and seasoning, a Martha Stewart creation. Enjoy!


Enjoy the Harvest!

Your farmers,

John and Aimee Good


 

Posted 8/21/2012 1:29pm by John and Aimee Good.

Farmer John has confirmed the presence of late blight disease in our tomatoes at the farm, both in the Upick garden and the field tomatoes. Late blight is a fungal pathogen, which first affects plant tissue, but will then produce lesions on the tomatoes, and eventually destroy the crop. It is impossible to "cure" it, organically or conventionally, once the tissue is infected, and very difficult to prevent it organically.

There were reports of late blight in this region much earlier in the season, but fortunately we did not get it at that time. The hot and dry conditions most likely prevented the spread of the fungus, as it prefers cool and wet conditions to spread. We have been having many light rains, heavy dews, and cooler temperatures as of late, so we were not surpised that the disease showed up now.

We just wanted to share this information with you, so you will understand why our tomato season will be cut short. The paste tomatoes are at their peak this week, so be sure to get out and pick your allotment, as this disease can progress quickly, and we may only have 1-2 weeks of tomatoes left.

Thanks for understanding, and for supporting your local, organic farmer.


Aimee Good


Posted 8/20/2012 3:04pm by John and Aimee Good.


FIELD UPDATE

The change of season is upon us: the nights are cooling down, the light is starting to become more golden, autumn light, and the fall flowers, such as goldenrod, are starting to bloom. I am always glad that summer ends so beautifully, with these pleasant days and nights, so we can look forward to the season coming again.

The harvest is changing as well. We have finished the spring carrots, but the fall carrots will most likely be ready in late September. We are giving the eggplant a short break, but we will harvest them again through the month of September. The first melon planting is ending this wee, but more melons are on the way, as you can see in the picture.  The second planting has both muskmelons and watermelons, that we hope will be ready by the end of the month or early September.  The melons have all come in later than expected this year, but the yield from the first planting was great, with very little losses, and we thought they were delicious!

We have just a bit more red potatoes for you, and then we will start on the Blue Viking potatoes, which are quite pretty with their blue skin and white flesh, and also very tasty. Rainbow Chard will be in the mix again this week. We have lots of other greens planted in the field, such as arugula, spinach, salad mix, and kale, and hope to begin harvest in early September.

We are still getting peak production from the field tomatoes, and in the Upick garden. So now is the time to stock up on these beauties for the winte, because a canned or frozen garden tomato in the winter is far superior, both in flavor and nutritive value, than a store-bought tomato. Freezing tomatoes is very easy. Since they are a fruit they require no blanching. Just quarter them, place in a freezer bag, and put in freezer. You can then use them for soup or stew in the winter. Once thawed, the skins slip off easily. Canning requires more work, but less freezer space. Tomato canning is simple, and can be done in a water-bath since tomatoes are acidic. For more information and tips, check out www.freshpreserving.com, the official site of Ball Canning. The Ball Blue Book of Preserving is also an excellent guide and reference.


"SECONDS" TOMATOES

We are setting aside "seconds" tomatoes for canning or freezing. These are tomatoes with cracks or other blemishes that make them unsuitable for CSA distribution. If you would like some, please let us know, or ask Heidi when you come to CSA pickup. They are $10 for a bucket (which is about 15-20 lbs) or $1/lb for smaller amounts. We generally get 1-2 buckets per picking, and would be happy to hold them for you if requested. 


PICKUP CHANGE NOTICE!

Please note: The CSA pickup for Friday, September 14th will be moved to Thursday, September 13th, to accommodate the Rodale Institute Organic Pioneers Awards Dinner, which is being held on Friday in the barn. All Friday pickup members, please put this change on your calendar. If you cannot pick up on Thursday September 13th, please let us know that you need to Tuesday September 11th for that week. Thank you very much.


THE HARVEST

White Onions

Red  &/or Blue Potatoes

Fresh Garlic

Red Tomatoes

Heirloom Tomatoes

Zucchini & Summer Squash

Peppers

Rainbow Chard

CHOICE: Melons & Cucumbers


Upick: Edamame, Basil, Cherry Tomatoes & Paste Tomatoes, Herbs & Flowers


Coming Soon: Sweet peppers (red bell, red Italia, and yellow), green beans, more eggplant, more muskmelons, watermelon



 Recipes

In case you have not yet used all your melon, there is a yummy recipe for Cantaloupe Bread on our website, a favorite recipe of Heidi's. When Celia was two, and Heidi often brought this bread to the farm as a treat for her, she called it "Heidi bread".

With the pleasant change in the weather, to cooler nights, I am once again making soup in our house. I love soup, but tend not to make it very often in the summer, except for cold soups. Mexican Tomato Soup is a tasty variation on tomato soup, especially delicious with pan-fried tortilla stips, diced avocado, and sour cream or plain yogurt.

Golden Cheddar Cheese Soup is a beautiful, blended golden soup with yellow squash, a kid-pleaser that the whole family will enjoy. Another kid-favorite in our house, which we all love, is Homemade Potato Crisps. A cross between oven fries and homemade potato chips, these make a delicious appetizer or side dish.

Thanks to member Sara Miller for sharing this recipe for Summer Vegetable Tian, a simple and tasty baked dish with very thin slices of all the summer veggies, topped by cheese and herbs. Click on the link to see the recipe.

http://budgetbytes.blogspot.com/2011/08/summer-vegetable-tian-660-recipe-110.html

 

Enjoy the Harvest!

Your farmers,

John and Aimee Good


 

Posted 8/13/2012 3:02pm by John and Aimee Good.


FIELD UPDATE

An organic farm is alive and buzzing with all manner of insects, such as this moth found in the bean patch. Some are helpful, some harmful, but the balance of the ecosystem often works in our favor. At times, when a pest population becomes a problem, a predator or parasite will arrive to handle the issue. For instance, we used to occasionally see damage in the tomato patch from the tomato hornworm, a large green caterpillar, as thick as your thumb, with a horn on its head. After a while, we also noticed that the hornworms were not moving, covered with white eggs, and then becoming black and shriveling up. A parasitic wasp raises its young on the "juices" of the hornworm, and we have little damage to the crop from hornworms any more!


PICKUP CHANGE NOTICE!

Please note: The CSA pickup for Friday, September 14th will be moved to Thursday, September 13th, to accommodate the Rodale Institute Organic Pioneers Awards Dinner, which is being held on Friday in the barn. All Friday pickup members, please put this change on your calendar. If you cannot pick up on Thursday September 13th, please let us know that you need to Tuesday September 11th for that week. Thank you very much.


BAG REMINDER!

All members are responsible for bringing their own bags, baskets, coolers, etc. to pick up their share. We provide a box for members to bring and share plastic grocery bags for emergencie, i.e. when people forget their bags, but these should not be relied upon to pick up your share each week. Please remember to bring your own bags or containers, including smaller ziploc style bags if you want to individually bag separate veggies. Thank you very much!


THE HARVEST

White Onions

Red Potatoes

Carrots

Fresh Garlic

Red Tomatoes

Heirloom Tomatoes

Zucchini & Summer Squash

Cucumbers 

Peppers

Melons


Upick: Edamame, Basil, Cherry Tomatoes & Paste Tomatoes, Herbs & Flowers



 Recipes

Melon season is a wonderful time. Here are some great ideas for different ways to enjoy the abundance of melons: Melon Smoothie (includes a variation for Melon Creamsicles), Easy Melon Sorbet, chilled Fruit Soup. The smoothie and sorbet recipes include instructions on freezing melon, which is easy and allows you to make these other treats at a later time.

Another new idea for zucchini: Zucchini-Feta Fritters with Tzatsiki Sauce, just because zucchini season is a long one, and I like new ideas. Zucchini freezes very well. Just grate and place in bags for short-term storage. For storage up to a year, place grated in zucchini in a colander. Dip into a larger pot with boiling water for about 1 minute. Dip into ice-water bath to cool quickly. Squeeze out excess water, pack 1 or 2 cups into bags, label and freeze.

The tomato harvest is once again coming on strong, and the paste tomatoes should be plentiful for another few weeks. I have included my favorite recipes for Salsa and Roasted Tomato Sauce, with tips on freezing or canning. These recipes are written in larger amounts for putting by, but you can just as easily make either in a smaller dinner-sized version. I made the Roasted Tomato Sauce this past week, roasting just one baking sheet of tomatoes in the oven, (about 2 quarts cut up tomatoes), with garlic, onions, basil, and some chopped carrots and zucchini. First, I roasted the tomatoes at 400 for about 30 minutes. Then, I sauteed all the ingredients except the tomatoes in a saucepan. Once tender, I added the roasted tomatoes and pureed slightly with an immersion blender. It was delicious, and my children ate two helpings!

 

Enjoy the Harvest!

Your farmers,

John and Aimee Good


 

Posted 8/6/2012 1:21pm by John and Aimee Good.


FIELD UPDATE

The tomatoes in the hoophouse have yielded well, but are now past their peak and production is waning.  However the field tomatoes, which are mainly heirloom varieties, are just starting to come in. So we are hopeful for a nice long tomato season. The heirloom varieties are very delicious, and more colorful than the red slicers. They have names like Cherokee Purple, Paul Robeson, Rose, Jubilee, and Great White. The heirloom tomatoes are more tender and thin-skinned, and they tend to crack more and have green shoulders. But their flavor and juiciness make up for all these things. Enjoy! 

The August harvest will also bring more peppers, hopefully ripening to red and orange later in the month. (Green peppers are simply unripe peppers, which is why the colored peppers are much sweeter. Alas, red and yellow peppers take a lot longer to ripen and unfortunately some are lost to rot, etc. along the way to ripening.)

We should also see more eggplant, both the oblong Italian and long, skinny Asian varieties. The Asian varieties are very tender, excellent for stir-fry or pan-saute with tomatoes, peppers, and onions. We pick the larger Italian varieties on the young side, to ensure that they are sweet and not bitter at all.

The heat and humidity has been hard on the farm crew. Working long days under these conditions, it is difficult to stay hydrated! The wet weather also encourages the growth of weeds and fungal diseases. We are trying our best to stay on top of these conditions.

We are beginning to look forward to autumn, and cooler weather. The field preparations for the fall continue: seeding of lettuce and fall greens, radishes, etc; bringing in the red and yellow storage onions to cure; cutting and sorting garlic for the fall planting and more.


THE HARVEST

White Onions

Red Potatoes

Carrots

Fresh Garlic

Tomatoes

Zucchini & Summer Squash

Cucumbers 

Peppers

CHOICE: Melons, Eggplant, Red beets, and Swiss Chard


Upick: Jade Green Beans, Basil, Cherry Tomatoes & Paste Tomatoes, Herbs & Flowers

Coming Soon: Edamame


 Recipes

Last year I discovered roasting eggplant on the grill is so delicious and easy, and makes for wonderful eggplant dips. Try Baba Ghanouj, the traditional Middle Eastern spread, or Caponata,a traditional antipasto.

There are many variations on stuffed zucchini, and all are quite tasty and a fun way to serve zucchini. This vegetarian version combines the zucchini innards with brown rice, cheese, and mushrooms. These are often called Zucchini Boats or Zuc-canoes, as in this recipe.

And of course, I discovered another way to turn zucchini into a dessert. Check out this recipe for Mom's Chocolate Zucchini Cake.


Enjoy the Harvest!

Your farmers,

John and Aimee Good


 

Posted 7/30/2012 9:40am by John and Aimee Good.


FIELD UPDATE

We are in the heart of summer crops now, yet we are also preparing for the fall season. The fall cabbages, broccoli, and kale were planted in early July, and covered with hoops and row covers as you see here. The covers help to protect them from insect pests while they are small. The fall beets and carrots were also seeded last month. The first fall salad greens are going to be seeded in the field this week, and every week after until September. The farmer's mind is always in many season at once; fully occupied by the present harvest, attending to the needs of the young crops, preparing ground for the next crops, planting cover crops for the off season, and planning crop rotations for the next year. 

 


Reminder: Fruit Share Starts this Week!

Please be sure to check off your name on the sign-in sheet, and take your fruit share from the bins in the corner. The fruit shares are all the same, so please just take the bag on the top. Do not sort through bags; this will preven the bruising of fruit. Any shares not picked up will be held in the cooler until the following week. Also, if you need to switch your pickup day or have a vacation, we will gladly hold your fruit in the cooler for you until the following week. When picking up a "held over share" please ask Heidi to get it for you, and DO NOT take an extra share from the bin of new shares. Thank you!



THE HARVEST

Swiss Chard

White Onions

Red Potatoes

Carrots

Fresh Garlic

Tomatoes

Zucchini & Summer Squash

Cucumbers 

Peppers

CHOICE: Eggplant, Red beets, and maybe Lettuce


Upick: Basil, Cherry Tomatoes & Paste Tomatoes (just starting - more to come), Herbs & Flowers

Coming Soon: Edamame, Melons, more Jade Green beans


 Recipes

Sometimes the most simple recipes are the best, emphasizing the great natural flavor of the veggies. At our house, these Maple-Glazed Carrots are a favorite; my children just gobble them up and so I make them often!

If you are interested in trying another lacto-fermented recipe, like the sauerkraut, these Gingered Carrots are delicious and easy to make. The beauty of these foods is that they keep for a long time, and they actually increase in nutritional value and digestibility. They are stronger flavored then fresh veggies, but can be used more as a condiment, as eating a small amount at each meal helps with digestion and also provides benefical bacteria in your diet (like in yogurt). I find that I crave their crunch and fresh taste, especially in the winter, when we are eating mostly stored roots and canned or frozen veggies.

The basil is beautiful and plentiful in the garden right now. It is a great time to make Pesto. Pesto freezes very well, so make extra and freeze for later. You can freeze it in small tupperwares, or in ice cube trays for single serving amounts. (Transfer to a ziploc freezer bag after the pesto cubes are frozen.)

Try this Garden Casserole for a great one-dish meal chock full of summer veggies. It is layered with eggplant, zucchini, tomatoes, etc. and ricotta cheese, topped with mozzarellla and bread crumbs. Yum!



Enjoy the Harvest!

Your farmers,

John and Aimee Good


 

Posted 7/23/2012 2:39pm by John and Aimee Good.


FIELD UPDATE

The farm enjoyed several inches of rain last week, and the plants have responded well. The flower garden is in full, beautiful bloom now. Enjoy the fresh bouquets.

The basil really enjoyed the rain, and is bountiful for picking in the garden. Basil will continue to provide for the rest of the summer as long as we keep it from flowering. So please try to harvest flowering branches as you are picking. Then simply remove the flower blossoms and use the leaves, which are still fine and tasty. The best way to keep basil is to put it in a jar of water on the counter, as you would a flower bouquet. It can get cold damage in the fridge and turn black.


The paste tomatoes and cherry tomatoes in the garden are starting to ripen as well. These plants will begin ripening from the bottom up, so look down low on the plants to find the ripe fruits. There are several varieties of paste, or plum, tomatoes. In general, they are meatier with less juice than the slicing varieties. They are excellent for sauce, salsa, etc.

 

The hoophouse tomatoes reached their peak of harvest last week, which was almost 1000 pounds for the week. They will continue to bear fruit for a few more weeks, but in decreasing amounts. The heirloom varieties planted in the field are growing nicely, and should begin bearing fruit in a couple of weeks. So we are hoping for a nice, long tomato season! The first eggplant and peppers are ready this week. There will be more to come. There are nice big cantaloupes on the vine in the field, and we are awaiting the first ripening, with excitement. August will bring all of these summer crops to your table! 

 


THE HARVEST

White Onions

Red Potatoes

Carrots

Fresh Garlic

Tomatoes

Red Beets

Zucchini & Summer Squash

Cucumbers

CHOICE: Broccoli, Lettuce, Asian eggplant, Green Peppers


Upick: Basil - New!, Jade Green Beans, Wax Beans, Cherry Tomatoes & Paste Tomatoes (just starting - more to come), Herbs & flowers

Coming Soon: Edamame, Melons


 Recipes

About this time of the summer I often find myself looking for new and interesting ways to cook with zucchini. On a hot night, make Grilled Zucchini Ribbon Salad without heating up the kitchen. Two of my old favorites for zucchini include Spaghetti with Zucchini and Lemon and Zucchini-Crusted Pizza (a great way to get kids to eat their veggies by putting them in the crust!)

Thanks to member and herbalist Karla Parker for contributing two of her favorite recipes for zucchini and cabbage. The first is Vegged-Up Oatmeal Cookies a sandwich cookie with a cream cheese filling (recipe to make your own cream cheese included). These are so delicious, my whole family gobbles them up. They freeze well too.

The second recipe is a fermented Sauerkraut that uses whey from the yogurt. Including fermented foods each day benefits health by promoting the growth of healthy flora in the gut which is essential to proper GI tract function.

I have made this sauerkraut and it is delicious, crunchy and tangy. Also, it is a great way to use up any cabbages still lingering in your fridge, and it keeps well for many months! - Aimee


Enjoy the Harvest!

Your farmers,

John and Aimee Good


 

Posted 7/16/2012 10:16am by John and Aimee Good.


FIELD UPDATE

We hope you enjoyed the first garlic of the season. There will be plenty more, since the harvest is in! All the garlic is now drying in the greenhouse, under the tables as you see here, which keeps it out of the direct sunlight. We put a shade cloth over the entire greenhouse to keep it cooler. The ventilation fans in the greenhouse provide for good air flow, to assist the drying process.

We received a much welcome rain yesterday. The fields got a good soaking. As you may have noticed, we were steadily irrigating for the past few weeks. We use overhead sprinklers in the Upick garden and the root (carrot & beet) and allium (onion family) field.

We increased our usage of drip tape this season, to make it easier to water more crops at once. (Because it requires less pressure and water volume than the overhead system, we can water several acres of crops at one time on drip tape.) Drip tape consists of long, thin, plastic tubes with small holes that emit water slowly, right at the root zone of the plants. It is a very efficient way to water, since little to no water is lost to evaporation. All the cucurbit (cucumber & squash family), and solanaceous (tomato, potato, eggplant, and pepper family) crops are watered this way, as well as the long season brassicas (broccoli, cabbage, & kale). The drip tape can be used alone on bare ground, or under black plastic as you see here in the zucchini. We use a minimum of black plastic in our fields, only on crops who show a significant increase in yields, and/or a much earlier harvest date, due to the increase in soil warmth from the black plastic.

 

FRUIT & BREAD SHARE REMINDER

Just a reminder on our policy for forgotten shares, for fruit, bread, and chicken. Any share that is not picked up will be held for one week. You may pick up forgotten or missed shares the following week, but you must ask Heidi to get them for you, as they will be stored in the cooler or freezer. Any shares that are not picked up after one week will be distributed to the farm apprentices.


THE HARVEST

New - White Onions!

New - Red Potatoes* (HOPEFULLY! We planned to dig them this week, as long as the soil is not too wet to dig. If necessary, the crew will try to dig them by hand for the share Tuesday! Otherwise, we will have them next week. Still, we can't complain because we needed the rain!) - see RECIPE

Carrots

Fresh Garlic

Tomatoes - see RECIPE

Red Beets

Zucchini & Summer Squash - See RECIPE

Cucumbers

CHOICE: Broccoli, Cabbage, Turnips, Lettuce

Coming Soon: Green peppers


Upick: Jade Green Beans, Cherry Tomatoes (just starting - more to come), Herbs & flowers


 Recipes

I just love the harvest of summer; juicy red tomatoes, tender zucchinis & squashes, crunchy cucumbers, the snap of fresh green beans, spicy garlic, fragrant herbs, creamy new potatoes, and more!

Tomatoes are starting to really ripen in the hoophouse. Make Cucumber & Tomato Salad, Tomato Galette or Tomato Pie, Fresh Salsa. Two of my most favorite, and simple, ways to eat tomatoes are: thick slices dressed with a little oil and sea salt and pepper; tomatoes cut in half, and fried cut-side down in olive oil or bacon fat (delicious served with scrambled eggs for brunch or dinner).

New potatoes are one of the more suprising treats of the garden, I think. We don't expect them to be SO different, and so much better, than old storage potatoes. But indeed, their fresh flavor is so good!I love to serve them steamed with a simple sauce of butter, cream, sour cream or creme fraiche, finely chopped fresh herbs, and sea salt and black pepper. I also love to make Garlic & Herb Potato Salad, which is an oil-based potato salad that can be served warm or cold.


Enjoy the Harvest!

Your farmers,

John and Aimee Good


 

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The Good Farm is a certified organic farm raising vegetables, berries, flowers, and herbs for a CSA (Community Supported Agriculture) and farmer's market. Farmers John and Aimee Good specialize in providing the best quality and most flavorful varieties of the vegetables you love to eat- the staples! We have happy members - over 70% return every year!

 

Many customers say they eat healthier, feel better, learn to cook new things, save money, and even lose weight by joining the farm. We are all connected to farming, as we are all eaters. Experience seasonal eating. Support a type of farm that you can believe in; the kind you imagined as a child; where people pick the produce by hand, the soils are thriving, and the fields are full of life. Become a CSA member or visit The Good Farm at the Trexlertown Farmer's Market. Because "it's all GOOD!"

 

"Eating is an agricultural act" - Wendell Berry

8112 Church Rd.
Germansville, PA 18053
484-262-0675
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