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Posted 7/23/2013 7:54am by John and Aimee Good.

BEETS

This has been the best beet crop ever at our farm. We hope you are enjoying these sweet beauties. We now have extra beets available for pre-order for members. Pickled beets are a great way to put up beets for the winter. I will send a recipe for canning pickled beets later today or tomorrow. To place an order for beets, please respond to this email with your name, pickup day, and desired amount. The price is $1.50/lb (wholesale price).

 

Bread & Egg Shares

We have been having some discrepancies with the bread and egg shares, and while we are sorting this out, we ask that everone check in with Heidi to pick up their bread and egg shares. Please get your bread &/or eggs from the usual place in the barn, then stop at Heidi's counter to check off the sheet for Bread & Egg Shares. Thanks very much for your cooperation!



Your farmers,


John and Aimee Good

Quiet Creek Farm

Posted 7/22/2013 12:54pm by John and Aimee Good.


FARM NOTES: Yeah - the first carrots of the season are in. There are two varieties in these bunches - a sweet orange variety called Mokum and a purple variety called Purple Haze. The purple carrots have a reddish orange interior and are beautiful when sliced. They are also sweet raw, but their flavor is even better when cooked. The farmer's favorite method: cook them in a saucepan covered with a lid, with a nice dollop of butter,  over medium low heat until tender, and then drizzle lightly with maple syrup or honey. To keep your carrots crisp in the fridge they must be stored in a sealed plastic bag. Ideally separate them from the tops first. They will lose moisture and become soft if just left in the crisper drawer.

Also new this week are the sweet white onions. These are a mild onion. Enjoy them raw sliced on sandwiches or in tomato salads. Try roasting them with beets in foil packets on the grill, and saute them with summer squash, etc. They will keep for a short time in a dry, dark location at room temp, like a cupboard or covered basket. For long term storage they should be transferred to the fridge. Because they are a sweet onion, they do not keep for months as the winter storage onions do. The general rule is: the spicier the onion, the longer the storage.

2nds: 2nds tomatoes are still available in the barn each pickup day.

A Note about Cooperative Shares! Please make sure that you check off your name when picking up your share. If you switch your pickup day within the week, your eggs & cheese will be available, but you cannot get your bread, fruit, chicken, and pizza shares that day. They will come on your normal day and we will hold them for you to pick up on your next regular pickup day.

Cooperative Shares: Chicken & cheese shares this week.



THE HARVEST

Carrots - orange & Purple Haze

Sweet white onions

Fresh garlic

Green Peppers

Eggplant

Red Beets

Zucchini & Summer Squash

Cucumbers

Tomatoes



UPICK

Hot peppers, Flowers, Green beans, Cherry tomatoes, Basil, Cilantro, Parsley, Dill and Perennial herbs: chives, oregano, thyme, sage, garlic chives

COMING SOON

Melons


RECIPES: Two sweet ideas for your veggie share: Zucchini-Blueberry Bread and Secret Chocolate Cake (the secret ingredient is beets!). For a unique carrot salad, try Asian Carrot Slaw (you could substitute chives or finely chopped sweet onions for the scallions in this recipe). One of my favorite summer salads is Tomato-Cucumber Salad. 


As always, if you need an idea for the produce in your share, check our Recipe Page! You can search by vegetable!

 

Your farmers,


John and Aimee Good

Quiet Creek Farm

Posted 7/15/2013 6:31pm by John and Aimee Good.

 

 


The tomato harvest has increased to the point that 2nds tomatoes are now available, for canning, freezing, saucing etc. The tomatoes are harvested every Monday and Thursday, and the 2nds from each harvest will be available at the subsequent pickup day, Tuesday and Friday. We will have a container available in the barn. They will be "first come, first serve" until they are gone each day. Just ask Heidi if you would like some. The price will be $1.25/lb, which is half the wholesale price for tomatoes.

Thank you!


Your farmers,


John and Aimee Good

Quiet Creek Farm

Posted 7/15/2013 2:45pm by John and Aimee Good.


FARM NOTES: Hot, Hot, Hot! The lettuce season is officially over, and the summer harvest season is on! The tomatoes are really starting to come in. It is time for tomato salads, tomato pies, fresh salsa, and juicy tomato sandwiches. Enjoy these summer treats!

New this week- green peppers and a bit of Asian eggplant. We expect to have sweet onions and cantaloupe soon.  The garlic is ready for harvest, and you will get fresh garlic in your share this week. This garlic is very tasty, strong, and delicious. You can store it in a cool, dry place or in the refrigerator, as it is pulled directly from the field and has "moist" papers. The farm crew will begin to harvest all the garlic this week and start to dry it for long-term storage.

And now, I want to put in a good word for the yellow summer squash. Many people seem to pick over it in favor of the zucchini. Perhaps this is because of more familiarity with zucchini, or because more recipes call for zucchini, or of a memory of eating an old variety crookneck squash with big chewy seeds and mealy flesh. Let me assure you that our yellow squashes are not like the old crookneck squashes. First of all, we pick them on the younger side so that their flesh is tender and the seeds are not overly large. Secondly, the newer varieties of yellow squash are very tender and mild, and are more akin to a yellow zucchini. So I would like to encourage you to try some more of the yellow squashes. A more colorful plate is always a nice thing. And yellow squash can replace zucchini in any recipe. Grated yellow squash also blends into dishes very well. For example, whenever I make tacos - which is a frequent dinner in our house in the summertime- I add grated yellow squash to the beans or chicken for the taco filling. It can be added to soups, pancakes, breads, etc. Use your imagination and enjoy! And check the recipes below for some more ideas for yellow squash.


THE HARVEST

Fresh garlic

Green Peppers

Asian eggplant - small amounts from first picking

Red Beets

Zucchini & Summer Squash

Garlic Scapes

Cucumbers

Tomatoes



UPICK

Flowers, Green beans, Basil, Cilantro, Parsley, Dill and Perennial herbs: chives, oregano, thyme, sage, garlic chives

COMING SOON

Cherry tomatoes, sweet onions, melons


RECIPES: Spaghetti with Zucchini and Lemon is an old favorite of mine, which features both zucchini and summer squash with a simple spaghetti flavored with lemon juice and parmesan cheese.

Simple Sauteed Yellow Squash is a tender, sweet, satisfying dish that is so simple to make. This is the way I most often make summer squash.

Syrian Beet Salad is delicious with flavors of fresh cilantro, cumin, garlic, and lemon juice.


As always, if you need an idea for the produce in your share, check our Recipe Page! You can search by vegetable!

 

Your farmers,


John and Aimee Good

Quiet Creek Farm

Posted 7/8/2013 1:41pm by John and Aimee Good.


FARM NOTES: How are these vegetables going to travel from our farm to your home? Please remember to bring your own bags, baskets, coolers, etc. to transport your produce, including bags for lettuces and greens. And if you have a collection of clean plastic bags, please feel free to bring those to the farm and place them in the wooden boxes at the sign-in table, to share with other members, for the days when we forget our bags! 


The tomato harvest should be increasing this week. Hopefully we will have some eggplant and pepper soon. The garlic harvest is also not far off. We are on our way to more summer crops! Sadly, the lettuces will be finished shortly. But we do have some very nice tender cabbages this week, which will make lovely slaws for this hot weather. And there are so many ways to make salads in the summer. Check out the recipes below for Beet Salad, Broccoli Salad, and Zucchini-Tahini Dressing!

Cooperative Shares: Cheese shares are delivered this week!

NEW- We will have extra cheeses from Hillside acres available for purchase from the display cooler!

NEW - You may have notice that we have a new dairy producer for the farm store - Wholesome Dairy Farms yogurts, kefir, and greek yogurts are made fresh with milk from a small herd of grass-fed cows, located in Douglassville, PA.


PAYMENTS: Final payments are overdue. ALL BALANCES MUST BE PAID IN ORDER TO PICK UP YOUR SHARE THIS WEEK!

Please check the Customer Balance sheet here, or in the barn to make sure your balance is paid in full. Please let me know if you have any questions or problems with your balance. Thank you!



THE HARVEST

Red Beets

Lettuce heads

Zucchini & Summer Squash

Garlic Scapes

Cucumbers

Tomatoes

Tendersweet Cabbage

Broccoli - last picking


UPICK

Green beans, Cilantro, Parsley, Dill and Perennial herbs: chives, oregano, thyme, sage, garlic chives

COMING SOON

Garlic, Green Peppers, Asian eggplant


RECIPES:  Although the broccoli harvest is on the way out, if you have a backlog of broccoli in your fridge as I did, this Broccoli Salad is a great recipe. I especially like it because it is a healthy variation on this traditional picnic favorite - using plain yogurt instead of mayonnaise.

I love beets in all forms, but this Beet Salad may turn the heads of even those who shy away from beets.

My mother passed me this recipe for Zucchini-Tahini Dressing which is very tasty and a lovely shade of green. It makes a delicious salad dressing, or you can make it into a dip by substituting the olive oil with cream cheese or sour cream. Enjoy!


As always, if you need an idea for the produce in your share, check our Recipe Page! You can search by vegetable!

 

Your farmers,


John and Aimee Good

Quiet Creek Farm

Posted 7/1/2013 2:38pm by John and Aimee Good.


FARM NOTES: This has been an excellent spring for broccoli. The cooler start to the season and the ample rainfall has greatly benefitted this crop. We are just starting on the harvest of the new "heat-tolerant" variety, which is the third succession planting. We hope you are enjoying this tasty, green "flower" of the garden. (Broccoli is unique in that we eat the flower of the broccoli plant, whereas in most vegetables, we eat the fruit, leaf, or root of the plant.) 

The cucumbers are also doing very well this spring. The first cukes are a a new, early-maturing variety and we are pleased with the flavor, appearance, high yields and early ripening. We hope you are loving them as well! Most of those we have eaten were quite sweet, but I have noticed an occasional cucumber with bitter skin, which can happen in hot spells. If the skin is bitter, you can peel the cucumber and the flesh is still sweet.

BULK ORDERS OF CUKES FOR PICKLING AVAILABLE! The cucumbers are growing very quickly and the second planting is about to come in this week too, having caught up to the first. Since we are going to have a glut of cucumbers, we are offering bulk orders of cukes to members for pickling, at the wholesale price of $1.50/lb.  Please email to let us know how many pounds or cucumbers you want, your name, and your pickup day. We will have them packed and ready for your pickup day. Payment is due at pickup. Check the recipes below for canning sweet Bread & Butter Pickles and Dill Pickles, as well as Heidi's easy Refrigerator Pickles.


Cooperative Shares: Pizza and chicken shares are delivered this week!


PAYMENTS: Final payments were due last week. There are quite a few members with outstanding balances.

ALL BALANCES MUST BE PAID IN ORDER TO PICK UP YOUR SHARE THIS WEEK!

Please check the Customer Balance sheet here, or in the barn to make sure your balance is paid in full. Please let me know if you have any questions or problems with your balance. Thank you!



THE HARVEST

Red Beets

Rainbow Chard or Kale

Lettuce heads

Salad mix

Broccoli

Zucchini & Summer Squash

Mini Purplette Onions

Garlic Scapes

Cucumbers

Tomatoes - first picking from the hoophouse - a bit pink & firm. Allow them to ripen for at least 2 days on the counter for best eating quality!


UPICK

Sugar Snap peas*, Cilantro, Parsley, Dill and Perennial herbs: chives, oregano, thyme, sage, garlic chives

*Sugar Snap peas are at their peak! Pick and store in sealed plastic bags in the fridge. For long-term storage, steam-blanch for 1-2 minutes only in a colander, cool quickly in an ice-water bath, dry on towel, pack into ziploc bags, squeeze out excess air, and store in freezer. Be sure not to over-cook or peas will be soggy when thawed for stir-fry. 

COMING SOON

Garlic, Green Peppers, Asian eggplant


RECIPES:   Beets are new this week. Separate the roots from their tops, and store each in a plastic bag to prevent drying out. I just love fresh beets from the farm. They are so sweet! Try them roasted or grilled, which really intensifies the flavor and sweetness. See the recipes for Roasted Beets and Grilled Beets for instructions. Beets can also be grated raw onto a salad, which is very pretty and tasty. Check out the various Beet Salad recipes on the website. Also, beet tops can be cooked just like swiss chard. You can even cook them together. Wash leaves, chop finely, and saute with onion or garlic scape and tomato. They are great with eggs or pasta.


If you are interested in preserving the harvest, pickles are an easy and delicious place to start. For bulk amounts of cukes for canning, please email to place an order for pickup at the farm on your regular day. The Bread & Butter Pickles and Dill Pickles are my two favorites for canning.

We also have two recipes for Refrigerator pickles, for small batches just stored in the fridge.


As always, if you need an idea for the produce in your share, check our Recipe Page! You can search by vegetable!

 

Your farmers,


John and Aimee Good

Quiet Creek Farm

Posted 6/24/2013 2:29pm by John and Aimee Good.


FARM NOTES: The last week of June, and the heat of summer is upon us. The spring crops are waning. The strawberries are just about done producing. We hope you enjoyed the taste of the berries this spring. We were glad that we still got some fruits after the freeze on Mother's Day ruined the first blossoms. With any luck, and avoiding a late freeze, we hope to have much better yields next year. We will soon renovate this patch to keep it for next year. We will also be planting another patch this fall, for picking in the spring of 2014.

Cool season crops are on their way out. The spinach has gone to seed. This will be the last week for the radishes, turnips, and Napa cabbage. We have planted a third succession of very heat-tolerant broccoli, which looks great and is just starting to form heads.  So we should contine to have broccoli for a few weeks. We hope to have lettuce for a few more weeks as well, but we will have to see how it handles this heat. The heat should bring on the harvest of the summer crops -cucumbers, zucchini, and the much-anticipated first tomatoes of the season. Pictured to the left are the green beauties hanging in the tomato hoophouse. We are eagerly awaiting their ripening!

Cooperative Shares: Cheese shares are delivered this week!

PAYMENTS: Please check the Customer Balance sheet here, or in the barn. All final payments are due June 30th. Everyone must be paid in full this week in order to continue to pick up their shares in July. Please let me know if you have any questions or problems with your balance. Thank you!

Sign-in: Please sign in when picking up your vegetable share, and any other "Cooperative Shares" every week. Thanks!


THE HARVEST

Lettuce heads

Salad mix

Napa cabbage OR Tendersweet Cabbage

Hakurei turnips OR Radishes

Broccoli

Zucchini & Summer Squash

Scallions

Garlic Scapes

Possibly Cucumbers


UPICK

Sugar Snap peas, Cilantro, Parsley, Dill and Perennial herbs: chives, oregano, thyme, sage, garlic chives

COMING SOON

Red Beets, Garlic


RECIPES:   It is always exciting when then garlic scapes are ready. Their fresh, unique garlic flavor is wonderful. Garlic scapes are the green flowering tops of the garlic plant which will form the seed head. To replace garlic in recipes, 2-3 scapes is equivalent to 1 clove of garlic. Chop scapes finely, as you would garlic cloves.Garlic scapes can be roasted whole. Just add whole scapes to any roasted veggie dish, or throw on the grill. See the recipe for White Bean & Garlic Scapes Dip

For supper on a warm evening,  I like to make this dish - Grilled Romaine Lettuce, which is slighlty smoky and wilted, but still crunchy and juicy. It can be served as is or made into a dinner salad with some smoked tofu or grilled chicken and sliced veggies. Although the recipe calls for Romaine, I think it could be done with the large greenleaf heads as well.

The cabbage is doing very well this spring. The last of the Napa cabbage will be in the share this week, and likely the first of the Tendersweet. Tendersweet is a delicious cabbage that lives up to its name, with very fine, crunchy, mild-flavored leaves. For something different, try this Asian-flavored Slaw. Although the recipe calls for Napa Cabbage, it would work just as well with the Tendersweet.

And last but not least, I wanted to re-introduce one of my favorite recipes for using up the last veggies from the share at the end of the week. This Spring Quiche recipe is a great one for substituting a bit of whatever you have on hand, and is very quick to make with a crumb crust instead of a pie dough crust. Enjoy!


As always, if you need an idea for the produce in your share, check our Recipe Page! You can search by vegetable!

 

Your farmers,


John and Aimee Good

Quiet Creek Farm

Posted 6/17/2013 3:27pm by John and Aimee Good.


Farm Thanks: Farm apprentice Kristina Markey captured the lovely images featured in this harvest update. Thanks Kristina!

Farm Notes: I love to walk the fields after a good soaking spring rain. There is such beauty in the long rows of vibrant green crops against the backdrop of moist, rich soil. The farm landscape is just as pleasing to the eye as each vegetable in it. The close-up shot below show that our favorite Hakurei turnip, fresh-picked in the hand, is just as beautiful, in its own unique way. We strive for excellence on our farm. And beauty is a measure of that. Farmer John always says that if it looks beautiful, we must be doing something right.

Cooperative Shares: Switchback Pizza Company's Pizza Shares first delivery is this week. Please check off your name on the member sheet, and find your pizzas in the small white freezer next to the walk-in cooler. Heidi will be collecting any balances owed for pizza shares this week.

Payments: Please check the Customer Balance sheet here, or in the barn. All final payments are due June 30th. Thank you!

Sign-in: Please sign in when picking up your vegetable share, and any other "Cooperative Shares" every week. Thanks!



THE HARVEST

Lettuce heads

Salad mix

Kale

Spinach

Napa cabbage

Hakurei turnips

Radishes

Broccoli

Zucchini & Summer Squash

Scallions

UPICK

Sugar Snap peas, Strawberries, Cilantro, Parsley, Dill and Perennial herbs: chives, oregano, thyme, sage, garlic chives

COMING SOON

Cabbage, Red Beets


COOKING & STORAGE TIPS

Greens storage: Greens keep best in plastic containers or sealed bags, with some air space to avoid crushing. A damp towel on top and bottom will prevent wilting, but be careful - too much moisture will reduce shelf life. You can remove the greens from turnips store them separately from the roots, to save space and improve shelf life.Greens should be used in 1-2 weeks: 1 week for salad greens, 2 weeks for cooking greens, such as kale.

Roots storage: Roots such as turnips and radishes should be stored separate from their tops, in a sealed container, or in a plastic bag in the crisper drawer of your fridge. Roots will keep for several weeks, but they need high humidity. The fridge is very drying, and if they are not kept in a sealed container or plastic bag, it will pull the moisture out of them and they will become soft and rubbery.

Recipes: I always like to provide lots of recipe ideas for Napa Cabbage (also called Chinese Cabbage), since it is more unfamiliar vegetable and it is so big. There are many wonderful ways to use this vegetable. Some new recipe ideas include: Spring rolls with Peanut Sauce, Napa Cabbage Stir-fry with shrimp, Karen's Napa Recipe from Brookfield Farm (which combines napa, gruyere cheese, and olives with an light dressing) and Korean Sauerkraut (Kimchi), a naturally fermented vegetable mixture that is tangy, spicy, and delicious, as well as fun and easy to make.

For more Napa information - (repeated from last week) read this. . . Napa is a tender, leafy version of cabbage. It has a slightly sweeter taste and is more juicy than traditional cabbage. It is delicious in stir-fry, and also makes wonderful slaws or salads. To use, separate leaves and wash well. Stack leaves on top of each other. Slice through pile to make thin strips for stir-fry or salad. Or use a mandolin or food processor to slice very thinly.

Be sure to check the Recipe Page of our website for lots of great recipe ideas. You can search by vegetable!

 

Your farmers,


John and Aimee Good

Quiet Creek Farm

Posted 6/10/2013 1:42pm by John and Aimee Good.


Farm Notes: The farm crew was very excited about getting to experience the whole life cycle of broccoli last week. They harvested the first spring planting, and sowed the seeds for the fall planting in the greenhouse, all in the same week.

The spring broccoli which you are now eating was sown in the greenhouse March 1st. It is sown in special seeding flats which can hold about 500 seeds to fit onto our heat mats, which ensure a warm, even soil temperature for the best germination. After germination, the seedlings are transplanted to cell trays and grown on to "field transplanting" size. These broccoli starts (shown on the right) were planted out mid-April and covered with a mini-tunnel constructed of wire hoops and row covers, for pest and cold protection. They grew well this spring, and twe expect to complete the harvest of the first planting this week. But we have two more spring plantings which should follow this one closely - so we are hoping for a nice long, tasty broccoli harvest!

The first fall planting, which the apprentices sowed last week, will be planted out in the field late July, under a mini-tunnel again for protection from flea beetles which can be terrible in the heat of the summer. It will hopefully come in for a mid-September harvest.

Special Guests: Rob & April Fix of Ledamete Grass Farm will be at the pickup on Tuesday from 2-6 pm with their organically raised meats for sale: pastured poultry (whole chickens, halves, and parts  including new boneless breasts), forest & pasture-raised pork (many cuts available) as well as their sustainable soaps.Click on this link for more information about their offerings. http://p0.vresp.com/b2blTw

Hill Acres Pride will be at the farm on both Tuesday and Friday to sample their cheeses. The first cheese share pickup is this week, but the farmers are still accepting signups for cheese shares, which will begin with the next delivery. 

Payments: Please bring payment with you for any reserved egg & bread shares. If you are overdue for a scheduled CSA payment, please bring it with you to pickup. All final share payments are due June 30th. Check the Customer Balance sheet here, or in the barn. Thank you!

Sign-in: Please sign in when picking up your vegetable share, and any other "Cooperative Shares" every week. Thanks!

THE HARVEST

Lettuce heads

Salad mix

Kale

Choice of Greens: Arugula, Spinach, Asian spinach

Bok choy & or Napa cabbage

Hakurei turnips

Broccoli

UPICK

Perennial herbs: chives & chive blossoms, oregano, thyme, sage, garlic chives

COMING SOON

Zucchini, Scallions, Sugar snap peas, Cabbage


COOKING & STORAGE TIPS

Greens storage: Greens keep best in plastic containers or sealed bags, with some air space to avoid crushing. A damp towel on top and bottom will prevent wilting, but be careful - too much moisture will reduce shelf life. You can remove the greens from turnips store them separately from the roots, to save space and improve shelf life.

Our spring Kale is a variety called Siberian with smooth, green leaves. It is very tender and mild, a delicious cooking green. After washing the leaves, remove the center rib. I like to hold the stem at the end and then slide my fingers back along the rib towards the top of the leaf to remove the rib. Otherwise, you can cut it out. Stack the leaves on top of each other. Roll them up tight and chop into thin strips. Saute until kale is wilted and bright green. My simple standby is olive oil and garlic, with a splash of tamari soy sauce and balsamic vinegar added at the end. Carolina Kale is a pretty and tasty dish that combines the sweetness of cooked tomatoes, onions, with kale, spiced with cumin. This recipe, along with Kale Chips, can convert those who do not readily enjoy kale. Creamy Kale Pasta and Garlic n' Greens Pizza are two delicious recipes that pair creamy cheeses with this dark nutritious green. 

Napa Cabbage (also called Chinese Cabbage) is a tender, leafy version of cabbage. It has a slightly sweeter taste and is more juicy than traditional cabbage. It is delicious in stir-fry, and also makes wonderful slaws or salads. To use, separate leaves and wash well. Stack leaves on top of each other. Slice through pile to make thin strips for stir-fry or salad. Or use a mandolin or food processor to slice very thinly. Some recipes to try: Beef & Napa Cabbage Stir-fry, Napa Cabbage Pork Stir-fry (or substitute tofu for a vegetarian version); also Crunchy Napa Cabbage Slaw and Napa Cabbage Salad with Peanuts


Be sure to check the Recipe Page of our website for lots of great recipe ideas. You can search by vegetable!

 

Your farmers,


John and Aimee Good

Quiet Creek Farm

Posted 6/3/2013 5:11pm by John and Aimee Good.

 

 

First Monthly Market with Ledamete Grass Farm  Next Tuesday, June 11th, 2-6 pm

 


Rob Fix of Ledamete Grass Farm will be at the farm next Tuesday, June 11th, from 2-6 pm with forest & pasture-raised pork, pastured poultry, and sustainable soaps available for purchase. All their animals are fed organically-grown grains. For more information, and to place pre-orders, please click on the link below.

http://p0.vresp.com/b2blTw




Your farmers,


John and Aimee Good

Quiet Creek Farm

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The Good Farm is a certified organic farm raising vegetables, berries, flowers, and herbs for a CSA (Community Supported Agriculture) and farmer's market. Farmers John and Aimee Good specialize in providing the best quality and most flavorful varieties of the vegetables you love to eat- the staples! We have happy members - over 70% return every year!

 

Many customers say they eat healthier, feel better, learn to cook new things, save money, and even lose weight by joining the farm. We are all connected to farming, as we are all eaters. Experience seasonal eating. Support a type of farm that you can believe in; the kind you imagined as a child; where people pick the produce by hand, the soils are thriving, and the fields are full of life. Become a CSA member or visit The Good Farm at the Trexlertown Farmer's Market. Because "it's all GOOD!"

 

"Eating is an agricultural act" - Wendell Berry

8112 Church Rd.
Germansville, PA 18053
484-262-0675
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