News and blog

Welcome to the blog.
Posted 9/16/2013 12:27pm by John and Aimee Good.


FARM NOTES: The greenhouse is full of squashes and onions. It is very beautiful to see the abundant fall harvest. In this picture are one table of gold onions, and two tables filled with Delicata squash. The other tables (not shown in this picture) are filled with bright orange Sunshine squash, butternuts and long neck pumpkins, which will be in the share in the weeks to come. The shares will continue through the month of October. The last scheduled pickup is Tuesday October 29th and Friday November 1st.

We will again be holding our "Stocking UP Sale" at the close of the season, for the products offered from other farms for our members. More information will be coming soon.


COOKBOOK ORDERS: Cookbooks are in! Please bring payment with you to pick up your book. Thanks!     

STILL TAKNG ORDERS: We had a few requests from members who wanted to order a book and missed the first order, so we are starting a 2nd order form. Let me know if you are interested in getting a book this time around!


IMPORTANT NOTE ABOUT COOPERATIVE SHARES:  You may only pick up fruit and bread shares on your normal pickup day! If you switch your day, you have to wait until your next pickup day to get your fruit and/or bread. It will be held in the cooler or freezer for you. The fruit and bread shares are only delivered on your regular pickup day, so if you take one on a day that is not your normal day, you are taking someone else's share! 

This does not apply to the eggs and cheese, as they are delivered at the beginning of the week for the entire week.

Fruit, eggs, cheese and bread shares this week.



THE HARVEST

Delicata Squash OR Sunshine Squash

Broccoli

Leaf Lettuce

Gold potatoes

Tomatoes

Garlic

Yellow Onions

Peppers OR Carrots

Chard OR Kale


COMING SOON:  Arugula, Cabbage, Hakurei turnips, radishes



UPICK

Paste tomatoes, Cherry tomatoes, Hot peppers, Raspberries, Flowers, and Herbs


RECIPES: Fall weather is for comfort foods. Check out this Simple Potato Gratin, with delicious variation ideas, such as including a layer of sauteed leeks and mushrooms or greens, or substituting other fall roots such as celeriac or parsnips for some of the potatoes.

My children love cooking using their Simply In Season Children's Cookbook, and the whole family enjoys the recipes as well. Here is one of our favorites, Broccoli & Cheese Soup, also called Green Monster Soup, which is delicious and easy.

As always, if you need an idea for the produce in your share, check our Recipe Page! You can search by vegetable!

FYI, you can always reference past email updates by going to the News & Blog page of our website.

 

Your farmers,


John and Aimee Good

Quiet Creek Farm

Posted 9/9/2013 1:08pm by John and Aimee Good.


FARM NOTES: The first squash of the season is ready - Delicata. Here are these beauties curing in the greenhouse. These sweet autumn treats will be in your share this week. They keep very well at room temperature, and are pretty enough for display on your table!

Follow these instructions on cooking winter squash: When you are ready to cook your squash, first wash it, cut in half, remove stem, and scoop out seeds. The seeds can be cleaned and baked in the oven with some salt, or my favorite - olive oil and tamari soy sauce - at 350 for about 25 minutes, until crispy. What a delicious snack! Now to bake the squash. Place it cut side down in a baking dish with about an inch of water. Bake at 350 for about about 35 minutes, until tender (should pierce easily with a fork). Invert squash and add butter and maple syrup and enjoy!

Delicata squashes are also wonderful for stuffing, with your favorite mixture of grains, apples, nuts, and/or sausage. I generally saute the stuffing mixture while the squash is baking, and then place it inside the cavity when it is done, or nearly done. Delicata squash are special becuase their skins are very tender, and are easily eaten. Check out the recipe below for Baked Delicata Moons!


IMPORTANT: THIS WEEK!  PICKUP CHANGE FROM FRIDAY SEPT. 13th TO THURSDAY SEPT. 12th!  

COOKBOOK ORDERS: Cookbooks should be in by Thursday. Please bring payment with you to pick up your book on Thursday, or next Tuesday. Thanks!


2nds: 2nds tomatoes & peppers should still be available this week. Check Heidi's counter for available 2nds.

Cooperative Shares: Fruit, eggs, and bread shares this week.



THE HARVEST

Delicata Squash

Broccoli

Leaf Lettuce

Red & or Gold potatoes

Tomatoes

Garlic

Yellow Onions

Sweet colored Peppers

CHOICE: Leeks, Carrots, Beets


COMING SOON:  Cabbage, Hakurei turnips, radishes



UPICK

Edamame, Paste tomatoes, Cherry tomatoes, Hot peppers, Raspberries, Flowers, and Herbs


RECIPES: As mentioned above, see the recipe for Baked Delicata Squash Moons. I also discovered two delicious stuffed Delicata squash recipes: try Chipotle Black Bean Stuffed Delicata or Kale and Sausage Stuffed Delicata. Enjoy!


Here is a recipe contributed by a CSA member for Microwaved Potato Chips.

http://www.ziplist.com/souschef?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.foodgal.com%2F2010%2F01%2Fmicrowave-potato-chips-really%2F


As always, if you need an idea for the produce in your share, check our Recipe Page! You can search by vegetable!

FYI, you can always reference past email updates by going to the News & Blog page of our website.

 

Your farmers,


John and Aimee Good

Quiet Creek Farm

Posted 9/2/2013 3:22pm by John and Aimee Good.


FARM NOTES: In this field of green leaves xsmany winter squashes are hiding: delicata, sunshine, and long neck squashes (which are cousins to butternuts.) This picture was taken just a few weeks ago. Now the leaves are starting to die back and turn brown,  and the hidden squashes are revealed. So it is time to begin the squash harvest. First we will cut the winter squashes from the vines and line them up in the field by variety. Then we will load each variety into bins in the truck, and transfer them to the greenhouse. in the dry heat of the greenhouse the squash will "cure"- the stems will dry and seal for storage and the flesh will sweeten. These beauties are one of the sweet treats of fall.

As you may have noticed, the paste tomatoes have reached their peak in the U-pick garden. Delicious sauces, salsas, and more can be made from these meaty tomatoes, which can then be frozen or canned to enjoy later in the season. The hoophouse and field tomatoes are still producing, and we are very excited about such a long tomato season. This will be the 10th week of tomato harvest! Hope you are enjoying these delicious fruits of the garden.


IMPORTANT: MARK THE DATE!  PICKUP CHANGE FROM FRIDAY SEPT. 13th TO THURSDAY SEPT. 12th!  The Rodale Institute is hosting its Annual Organic Pioneers Awards Dinner on Friday September 13th and we are moving the pickup to Thursday to accommodate this event. Please let us know if you need to switch your pickup to Tuesday that week.

For more information about the Organic Pioneers Awards Dinner, see www.rodaleinstitute.org.


Last Chance for Cookbook Orders!

I will be placing the order on Wednesday Sept.4th, so there is still one more day to place an order. You can email me your order, with your name and number of copies, or sign up on the sheet in the barn. The cost is $17, payable when books are received.  The book is Fresh Food Nation: Simple, Seasonal Recipes from America's Farmers, to which I was a contributor, along with other farmers from all over the country.


2nds: 2nds tomatoes & peppers should still be available this week. Check Heidi's counter for available 2nds.

Cooperative Shares:  Pizza, (Chicken - Tuesday only), cheese, fruit, eggs, and bread shares this week.



THE HARVEST

Arugula

Carrots

Beets

Chard

Leeks

Red & or Gold potatoes

Tomatoes

Garlic

Sweet colored Peppers


COMING SOON:  Lettuce, Broccoli



UPICK

Edamame, Paste tomatoes, Cherry tomatoes, Hot peppers, Raspberries, Flowers, and Herbs


RECIPES: Yeah - fresh salad greens are back! A reason to celebrate the coming of autumn.  Arugula is the salad green this week, and the lettuce mix should be ready in another week or so. Pasta Salad with Goat Cheese and Arugula is a tasty one-pot meal which can be enjoyed warm or room temperature.

This interesting Tomato Salad recipe calls for salting the tomatoes to concentrate the flavor. A great way to enjoy the remaining tomato season, with some fresh mozzarella and crusty bread - delicious!

This is a favorite preserving recipe of mine - Tomato Chili Sauce. It can be used so many ways - on potatoes, eggs, greens, beans & rice, etc. It is like a chunky, zesty, spicier version of ketchup.

As always, if you need an idea for the produce in your share, check our Recipe Page! You can search by vegetable!

FYI, you can always reference past email updates by going to the News & Blog page of our website.

 

Your farmers,


John and Aimee Good

Quiet Creek Farm

Posted 8/26/2013 10:20am by John and Aimee Good.


FARM NOTES: Perhaps you have noticed that we have a new resident in the raspberry patch this year. This is the common garden spider, also known as Argiope aurantia. These beautiful orb-weaving spiders have been living in the tomato patch and the tomato high tunnel at the farm for years. There are so many that when we go to pick in the mornings, we have to walk down the tomato rows with buckets in front of our faces to avoid being covered in web!

The common garden spiders like protected sunny locations with little wind. Their large size may be intimidating, but they are completely harmless and just want to be left alone. In fact, they are an extremely beneficial insect, as they eat lots of insect pests, including aphids, flies, and mosquitoes. Other neat facts: the female is larger than the male. The female builds the large orb web, and the male builds a smaller web on her web; the thick zig-zag white silk is part of the male's web. These spiders eat their webs every night and build a new one in the morning.

We hope you enjoy getting close-up with these beautiful garden friends in the raspberry patch!


IMPORTANT: MARK THE DATE!  PICKUP CHANGE FROM FRIDAY SEPT. 13th TO THURSDAY SEPT. 12th!  The Rodale Institute is hosting its Annual Organic Pioneers Awards Dinner on Friday September 13th and we are moving the pickup to Thursday to accommodate this event. Please let us know if you need to switch your pickup to Tuesday that week.

For more information about the Organic Pioneers Awards Dinner, see www.rodaleinstitute.org.


Cookbook Orders due this Week!

You can email me your order, with your name and number of copies, or sign up on the sheet in the barn. The cost is $17, payable when books are received.  The book is Fresh Food Nation: Simple, Seasonal Recipes from America's Farmers, to which I was a contributor, along with other farmers from all over the country.


2nds: 2nds tomatoes & peppers should still be available this week. Check Heidi's counter for available 2nds.

Cooperative Shares:  Chicken, fruit, eggs, and bread shares this week.



THE HARVEST

Kale

Leeks

Red & or Gold potatoes

Heirloom tomatoes

Red tomatoes

Garlic

Sweet colored Peppers

Choice: Sweet Corn, Cucumbers, Beets, Red Onions

COMING SOON: Arugula, Carrots, Lettuce



UPICK

Paste tomatoes, Cherry tomatoes, Hot peppers, Raspberries, Flowers, and Herbs

COMING SOON

More Edamame


RECIPES: Leeks are new this week. This creamy, mild cousin to the onion is wonderful sauteed until very soft, alone or with other vegetables. For a new recipe, try this Greek-style Pasta with Leeks, or for an old favorite, try Potato-Leek Soup

Here is a lovely recipe for Sweet Pepper Quiche, which uses red and/or orange peppers and leeks or onions, with options for a crumb, pie, or grated potato crust.

Soup season is here! Check out this White Bean and Garlic soup with Greens.


As always, if you need an idea for the produce in your share, check our Recipe Page! You can search by vegetable!

FYI, you can always reference past email updates by going to the News & Blog page of our website.

 

Your farmers,


John and Aimee Good

Quiet Creek Farm

Posted 8/19/2013 6:31am by John and Aimee Good.


FARM NOTES: Autumn is quickly approaching it seems. And the fall crops are growing very well in the field, with the abundance of rain and cooler temperatures. The winter squash field, which is just uphill of the raspberry patch, is a sea of green. But if you look closely, you can see bright orange, yellow, and large tan squashes peeking out from underneath the leaves. After the leaves of the plants begin to die back, and the squashes have ripened to their fullest, we will cut them from the vines and take them to the greenhouse for curing.

Eating in season works so well. As the weather starts to cool, we look forward to the return of fresh greens and hearty roots to fill our bellies. Arugula, carrots, and leeks should be in the harvest soon. At this time of year, I always feel a slight sadness as the end of summer approaches. All the same I love the beautiful days, and like a bear preparing for hibernation, try to eat my fill of the summer foods: tomatoes, melons, sweet corn, cucumbers, etc. before they are gone for another long winter.


New Cookbook: This past winter I contributed recipes to a new cookbook called Fresh Food Nation: Simple, Seasonal Recipes from America's Farmers, along with other farmers from all over the country. The focus of the book is on seasonal cooking, with many recipes from vegetable CSA farmers. It also includes great information and tips on eating seasonally. There are short bios about each of the farmer-contributors included, as well as beautiful pictures. This cookbook has now been printed and we are able to place a group order for our farm. I will have the book available for perusing near the sign-in table. If you would like to purchase one, please put your name and the number of copies on the sign-up sheet with the book.


2nds: 2nds tomatoes & peppers should still be available this week. Check Heidi's counter for available 2nds.

Cooperative Shares:  Cheese, fruit,eggs, and bread shares this week.



THE HARVEST

Swiss Chard

Red potatoes

Watermelons

Sweet Corn

Heirloom tomatoes

Red tomatoes

Red onions

Garlic

Sweet colored Peppers

Red Beets

Cucumbers

Mix & Match: Zucchini, Summer Squash, Eggplant

COMING SOON: Leeks, Carrots, Kale



UPICK

Paste tomatoes, Cherry tomatoes, Hot peppers, Yellow beans, Raspberries, Flowers, and Herbs

COMING SOON

Edamame


RECIPES: Here is a great link, shared by a long-time CSA member, for a recipe to use Swiss Chard stems. At the bottom there are also lots of other great ideas for swiss chard leaves & stems. Check it out!

http://www.kalynskitchen.com/2008/02/baked-swiss-chard-stems-recipe-with.html

One of my favorite treats of summertime is Fresh Corn Cakes. This recipe uses lots of corn and very little flour, and you beat the egg whites, which makes them very light & fluffy cakes. 

Another tomato idea which makes my mouth water: Gratineed Tomatoes with Asiago and Fresh Herbs, thick slices of different colored tomatoes, broiled with a layer of breadcrumbs, asiago or parmesan cheese, and finely chopped fresh herbs. Yum!


As always, if you need an idea for the produce in your share, check our Recipe Page! You can search by vegetable!

FYI, you can always reference past email updates by going to the News & Blog page of our website.

 

Your farmers,


John and Aimee Good

Quiet Creek Farm

Posted 8/12/2013 7:27am by John and Aimee Good.


FARM NOTES:

The sunflowers have certainly enjoyed this rainy summer. They are so tall! Our favorite is the "teddy bear" type, so named for its full, fuzzy head. These beauties will last for up to 2 weeks as a cut flower! Unfortunately some of the other varieties in the flower garden, such as the China asters, have succumbed to the wet soils, but there have still been plenty to pick for beautiful bouquets.

The new yellow cherry tomato which we trialed this year is Esterina. We believe we have finallly found another cherry which is just as delicious as Sun Gold - the orange variety. Esterina is more mild in flavor, less of an acid bite, than Sun Gold, but also very sweet. We love them both. Let us know what you think of our new variety trials in the year-end surveys!

The green beans are suffering some damage from the Mexican Bean Beetle, but it is much less extensive than last year, when we lost several plantings to the bean beetles. Earlier this season we released a beneficial insect, a parasitic wasp called Pebiobius Foveolatus. This very tiny wasp lays its eggs in the Mexican bean beetle larvae, the small yellow worm-like guys you see eating the leaves and beans. We are excited that the wasps seem to be helping in controlling the bean beetles, as there is little else you can do organically to prevent these hungry bugs from eating the entire crop. Next season we plan to release more Pebiobius, a little earlier, with hopes of even better results.

We hope you are enjoying the U-picking this season! Edamame should be next on the Upick list!



2nds: 2nds tomatoes should still be available this week. We will soon have 2nds of colored peppers for freezing as well. Check Heidi's counter for available 2nds.


Cooperative Shares:  Fruit shares this week.



THE HARVEST

Swiss Chard

Red potatoes

Watermelons

Heirloom tomatoes

Red tomatoes

Red onions

Garlic

Sweet colored Peppers

Red Beets

Zucchini & Summer Squash

Cucumbers



UPICK

Paste tomatoes, Cherry tomatoes, Hot peppers, Green beans, Flowers, and Herbs

COMING SOON

Edamame


RECIPES: The basil is at its peak in the Upick garden, and fall is approaching. So now is a wonderful time to make and freeze pesto. Pesto freezes beautifully and it is great to pull out a cube of amazingly fresh flavor in the middle of winter. It is delicous on pasta and bread, but also makes a nice addition to soups and stews. Freezing tips are included in the Pesto recipe.

The red potatoes have yielded very well. Here are some recipe ideas for potatoes. Two of my favorites are the Homemade Potato Crisps and the Oven Fries. The Potato-Onion-Pepper cakes are fun to bake - in muffin tins- and pretty on the plate! You can search for "Potato" to find all these recipes.

Watermelon is new this week. These sweet treats are great to simply eat - but you should also check out these fun recipes for Watermelon Popsicles, Watermelon Salsa, and Watermelon Aqua Fresca - a refreshing drink. Simply search for "watermelon" on the Recipe page to view them.


As always, if you need an idea for the produce in your share, check our Recipe Page! You can search by vegetable!

FYI, you can always reference past email updates by going to the News & Blog page of our website.

 

Your farmers,


John and Aimee Good

Quiet Creek Farm

Posted 8/5/2013 6:43am by John and Aimee Good.


FARM NOTES:

Yes it is the first week of August but the weather feels like September. The nights are so cool and the days are so pleasantly warm - not hot. This is great weather for the farmers, and for the cool season crops which are being planted now, such as the fall broccoli and cabbages, salad greens and lettuces. The cool nights have definitely slowed down the production of the cucumbers, zucchini, and summer squash. But we are getting into the peak time for summer harvest, and there are so many crops coming in right now. The high tunnel tomatoes should continue for a few more weeks yet. The field tomatoes are really just starting to come in, and will hopefully (without disease outbreak) continue through the month.

The melons are going to keep coming. Along with the cantaloupe there are two new varieties of melons this week: a special variety of Honeydew called Honey Orange, and a Canary melon, named for its bright yellow rind. The Canary melon is a new variety we trialed this year, and it is a keeper. This unique melon is very sweet, with a bit of a tropical flavor. The Honey Orange is a sweet, crisp, light orange-fleshed honeydew. Enjoy!

Tomatoes are in abundance right now. Here are a few preservation tips for the bounty.

1) Tomatoes freeze easily. You can halve or quarter them, remove cores, and put into a ziploc freezer bag. Squeeze out the excess air and place in the freezer. They can be used for soups & stews in the winter. When thawed, the skins slip off easily.

2) Tomatoes can also be dried. Core tomatoes and slice about 1/4 inch thick. Place in dehydrator or convection oven at 145 degrees and dry until they are leathery. Store in sealed bags or jars. These can be crumbled into salads or pasta dishes. To rehydrate, place some in a small bowl and pour boiling water over just to cover dried tomatoes. Let cool and drain. They have excellent flavor and take up very little space.

3) Roasted Tomato Sauce is very easy to make, and delicious. The sauce can be frozen in pint or quart containers or canned for long term storage. There are two recipes on the website - a new one for making a small batch for dinner and/or freezing, Fresh Roasted Tomato Sauce, as well as a larger recipe with canning instructions, Roasted Tomato Sauce for Canning


2nds: 2nds tomatoes- both reds and heirlooms - are still available in the barn each pickup day. $1.25/lb. Now is the time to freeze or can your tomato sauce, salsa, quartered or halved tomatoes, etc. Please ask Heidi if you would like a bulk amount.


Cooperative Shares:  Pizza and cheese shares this week.



THE HARVEST

Red potatoes

Cantaloupe, Honeydew, and Canary melons

Heirloom tomatoes

Red tomatoes

White and/or Red onions

Garlic

Green Peppers

Eggplant

Red Beets

Zucchini & Summer Squash

Cucumbers



UPICK

Paste tomatoes, Cherry tomatoes, Hot peppers, Flowers, and Herbs

COMING SOON

Edamame, red & orange peppers


RECIPES: Here is a wonderful recipe for melon contributed by a CSA member, Cantaloupe Drizzled with Lemon Cardamom Yogurt Sauce. It calls for cantaloupe but I think would also be delicious with the honeydew and canary melons.

This recipe for Fresh Roasted Tomato Sauce I developed the other night, based on the recipe I use for canning tomato sauce. It is very easy since all the veggies for the sauce are roasted in the oven and then pureed or chopped finely in the food processor. The roasting really intensifies the flavors and cooks off excess liquid so the whole thing was done in half an hour. 

I think this recipe for Cool Summer Beet Soup,which is pureed with yogurt, sounds delicious and so pretty! Enjoy!


As always, if you need an idea for the produce in your share, check our Recipe Page! You can search by vegetable!

 

Your farmers,


John and Aimee Good

Quiet Creek Farm

Posted 7/31/2013 6:50am by John and Aimee Good.

 

CARROTS

Carrots were on the harvest list for this week, however they will not be in the share this week. We apologize and wanted to let you know why. We did attempt to harvest carrots yesterday morning for the share. We had a full bed ready to dig. However, when we went to dig them, we discovered that the entire bed of carrots was ruined. They had started to rot. Full -grown carrots sit fairly deep in the ground, and since we have had so much rain recently (4 inches plus last week) the soils have not drained fully and the carrots have been essentially sitting in water for a week. Carrots are quite susceptible to rot in very wet soils. We were very disappointed to have lost this entire planting, and we are sorry that there will be no carrots in the share this week.


There are two more plantings in that field, which are still small. So hopefully if the soils drain and we do not get too much more rain, we will be able to harvest from those plantings. They would be ready in a few weeks.
We also have several beds of fall carrots planted, for harvest in September and October. We actually just had to re-seed the second planting of fall carrots yesterday, as well as some of the fall beets, as the seeds were washed away in the heavy storm we got over a week ago.We suspected that the seeds washed after the storm, but we waited a week and a half to check for signs of germination before spading in the bed and re-seeding it.


This is why we plant so many crops, in so many successions. Although it is frustrating to lose any crop after putting so much work into it, and carrots in particular are one of the most labor-intensive crops on the farm, we have many more crops on the farm which had a wonderful harvest yesterday. So the share is still beautiful and bountiful, which lessens the sting of the loss. In particular, the tomatoes are doing very well; the high tunnel is still going strong and the heirlooms from the field are starting to ripen now. Also the yield from the first potato digging was one of our best ever, and the new red potatoes are so delicious.We are grateful that we have been afforded such a bountiful harvest season thus far.


Enjoy your share of the harvest this week!



Your farmers,


John and Aimee Good

Quiet Creek Farm

Posted 7/29/2013 2:24pm by John and Aimee Good.


FARM NOTES: Hooray - the first potatoes of the season are here. In this picture from last season, John is harvesting the potatoes with the mechanical digger. However the first potatoes will be hand-dug this year, as the ground is still too wet from the heavy rains to use the tractor. Hand-digging several hundred pounds of potatoes is a challenging task indeed. As you enjoy these wonderful fresh spuds, think of the soils that nourished the plants, the rains that watered them, the sunlight that fed them, and the hands that dug each one.

Another new crop in the harvest is the cantaloupes or muskmelons. Technically, these varieties are muskmelons, named for their richly sweet aroma. Unlike grocery store melons, these are allowed to ripen on the vine and are picked when their color turns and they slip easily from the vine. They can be stored on the counter at room temperature for several days, but should be eaten while still firm, before any soft spots develop. By their nature, muskmelons vary a bit in flavor and sweetness, but all should be tasty. They are great for slicing and eating off the rind. But also check out the delicious recipes below for sorbet, smoothies, and bread.


2nds: 2nds tomatoes are still available in the barn each pickup day.


Cooperative Shares:  Chicken shares this week.



THE HARVEST

New potatoes

Cantaloupe

Heirloom tomatoes

Red tomatoes

Carrots - orange & Purple Haze

Sweet white onions

Garlic

Green Peppers

Eggplant

Red Beets

Zucchini & Summer Squash

Cucumbers



UPICK

Paste tomatoes, Cherry tomatoes, Hot peppers, Flowers, and Herbs

COMING SOON

Edamame, red & orange peppers


RECIPES: If you are getting a backlog of beets, try out this recipe for Pickled Beets. You can make a small batch and just put them in the fridge. Allow flavors to develop for at least 2 days before opening, but a week is best. After eating the beets, place hard-boiled eggs into the leftover juice to make delicious Red Beet Eggs.

Cantaloupe is a favorite of John and I, but our kids much prefer watermelon. However they do love Melon smoothies, Easy Melon Sorbet, and Cantaloupe bread. Try these out if melons are not your thing, or just for something different. They are all delicious recipes.


As always, if you need an idea for the produce in your share, check our Recipe Page! You can search by vegetable!

 

Your farmers,


John and Aimee Good

Quiet Creek Farm

Posted 7/23/2013 5:51pm by John and Aimee Good.


I would like to take a moment to explain to you, our rationale behind the sale of certain "extra" crops to members.

In general, we do pick all our crops completely and share them equally among members. We strongly believe in the basic tenet of the CSA - "share in the risk and share in the bounty by being a member of a farm."

There are certain instances where we may offer extras of a crop, when there are not enough to spread equally among all the members. For example, the 2nds tomatoes. We harvest tomatoes twice a week and there are always a few with bad spots, sun scald, etc. In the past we composted these or fed them to Rodale's or Ledamete Grass's pigs. After receiving requests from members for bulk produce for canning/preserving, we decided it made more sense for everyone to offer these 2nds tomatoes, which are only imperfect, not bad, to members for this purpose. However, since we cannot give them to everyone, as it is only 1-2 buckets each day, to be fair we offer them at a greatly discounted price to those who are interested. And the reason we sort out the 2nds in the first place is because we strive to give our members the best produce, such that everyone can pick up any item out of the bin and be satisfied.

Another time when we may offer extras is in the case of two successions of a crop overlapping, so that our harvest is doubled for a short time, and the yield is so much that we feel it would be burdensome for our members. For example, earlier this summer two plantings of cucumbers overlapped and members were getting 6-8 cucumbers a week, and not everyone was taking all their weekly allotment. So we decided to offer some of this excess to members who like to put up pickles for the winter. In this instance, we felt that our members were getting all they could take weekly in cucumbers, and so instead of composting the extra cucumbers leftover from the pickup days, we offered them at a discounted wholesale price to members. Since we could not provide bulk quantities of pickling cukes to everyone, and in fact I imagine not everyone wants to can pickles, we offered them for sale to be fair to all the members.

The offer of beets illustrates the third reason why we may sell extras of a crop. We planted three successions of beets in the spring. They all grew very well. We picked all the nice beets out of the first planting and have moved on to picking from the second and third successions, as they are ready now - with beautiful sweet beets with the nicest tops. There are still a few straggler beets left in the first planting, but their tops are not nice anymore and they are not going to be as sweet as the newer plantings. We have plenty to give everyone a nice bunch of beets every week from the newer plantings, for several weeks to come. Normally we would just till in the few remaining beets from the first planting. But since we received a request from a member for extra bulk beets for pickling, we decided to offer these beets - which are really 2nds now -  on a first come, first served basis to those members who would like pickling beets. We feel that 1 bunch/week of beets is more than ample, and in past years we have not given beets in the share every week, as they are one of those vegetables that not everyone loves. So we feel that our members are already getting a bounty of this crop, and that by picking some of the leftovers for members who want to do pickling rather than tilling them in is better for everyone. 

When we do offer "extras" it is at a low, wholesale price for two reasons. Since we cannot offer them to everyone, we feel it is only fair to sell them to those who want them.
We sell the "extras" at a low price, wholesale or less, to give our those who want them a "deal", out of respect for the relationship of our members to the farm.

I hope this fully explains our reasoning for offering "extras" of certain crops. We would never hold back on a crop in order to sell it to our members. We fully appreciate and respect the relationship between our members and us - the farmers. We value our members tremendously and appreciate everyone who makes this important commitment to our farm. In fact we began this practice of offering extras because of member feedback from our year-end surveys and email comments. Thanks for taking the time to read our thoughts. We hope this has answered any questions anyone may have.




Your farmers,


John and Aimee Good

Quiet Creek Farm

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The Good Farm is a certified organic farm raising vegetables, berries, flowers, and herbs for a CSA (Community Supported Agriculture) and farmer's market. Farmers John and Aimee Good specialize in providing the best quality and most flavorful varieties of the vegetables you love to eat- the staples! We have happy members - over 70% return every year!

 

Many customers say they eat healthier, feel better, learn to cook new things, save money, and even lose weight by joining the farm. We are all connected to farming, as we are all eaters. Experience seasonal eating. Support a type of farm that you can believe in; the kind you imagined as a child; where people pick the produce by hand, the soils are thriving, and the fields are full of life. Become a CSA member or visit The Good Farm at the Trexlertown Farmer's Market. Because "it's all GOOD!"

 

"Eating is an agricultural act" - Wendell Berry

8112 Church Rd.
Germansville, PA 18053
484-262-0675
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