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Posted 8/12/2013 7:27am by John and Aimee Good.


FARM NOTES:

The sunflowers have certainly enjoyed this rainy summer. They are so tall! Our favorite is the "teddy bear" type, so named for its full, fuzzy head. These beauties will last for up to 2 weeks as a cut flower! Unfortunately some of the other varieties in the flower garden, such as the China asters, have succumbed to the wet soils, but there have still been plenty to pick for beautiful bouquets.

The new yellow cherry tomato which we trialed this year is Esterina. We believe we have finallly found another cherry which is just as delicious as Sun Gold - the orange variety. Esterina is more mild in flavor, less of an acid bite, than Sun Gold, but also very sweet. We love them both. Let us know what you think of our new variety trials in the year-end surveys!

The green beans are suffering some damage from the Mexican Bean Beetle, but it is much less extensive than last year, when we lost several plantings to the bean beetles. Earlier this season we released a beneficial insect, a parasitic wasp called Pebiobius Foveolatus. This very tiny wasp lays its eggs in the Mexican bean beetle larvae, the small yellow worm-like guys you see eating the leaves and beans. We are excited that the wasps seem to be helping in controlling the bean beetles, as there is little else you can do organically to prevent these hungry bugs from eating the entire crop. Next season we plan to release more Pebiobius, a little earlier, with hopes of even better results.

We hope you are enjoying the U-picking this season! Edamame should be next on the Upick list!



2nds: 2nds tomatoes should still be available this week. We will soon have 2nds of colored peppers for freezing as well. Check Heidi's counter for available 2nds.


Cooperative Shares:  Fruit shares this week.



THE HARVEST

Swiss Chard

Red potatoes

Watermelons

Heirloom tomatoes

Red tomatoes

Red onions

Garlic

Sweet colored Peppers

Red Beets

Zucchini & Summer Squash

Cucumbers



UPICK

Paste tomatoes, Cherry tomatoes, Hot peppers, Green beans, Flowers, and Herbs

COMING SOON

Edamame


RECIPES: The basil is at its peak in the Upick garden, and fall is approaching. So now is a wonderful time to make and freeze pesto. Pesto freezes beautifully and it is great to pull out a cube of amazingly fresh flavor in the middle of winter. It is delicous on pasta and bread, but also makes a nice addition to soups and stews. Freezing tips are included in the Pesto recipe.

The red potatoes have yielded very well. Here are some recipe ideas for potatoes. Two of my favorites are the Homemade Potato Crisps and the Oven Fries. The Potato-Onion-Pepper cakes are fun to bake - in muffin tins- and pretty on the plate! You can search for "Potato" to find all these recipes.

Watermelon is new this week. These sweet treats are great to simply eat - but you should also check out these fun recipes for Watermelon Popsicles, Watermelon Salsa, and Watermelon Aqua Fresca - a refreshing drink. Simply search for "watermelon" on the Recipe page to view them.


As always, if you need an idea for the produce in your share, check our Recipe Page! You can search by vegetable!

FYI, you can always reference past email updates by going to the News & Blog page of our website.

 

Your farmers,


John and Aimee Good

Quiet Creek Farm

Posted 8/5/2013 6:43am by John and Aimee Good.


FARM NOTES:

Yes it is the first week of August but the weather feels like September. The nights are so cool and the days are so pleasantly warm - not hot. This is great weather for the farmers, and for the cool season crops which are being planted now, such as the fall broccoli and cabbages, salad greens and lettuces. The cool nights have definitely slowed down the production of the cucumbers, zucchini, and summer squash. But we are getting into the peak time for summer harvest, and there are so many crops coming in right now. The high tunnel tomatoes should continue for a few more weeks yet. The field tomatoes are really just starting to come in, and will hopefully (without disease outbreak) continue through the month.

The melons are going to keep coming. Along with the cantaloupe there are two new varieties of melons this week: a special variety of Honeydew called Honey Orange, and a Canary melon, named for its bright yellow rind. The Canary melon is a new variety we trialed this year, and it is a keeper. This unique melon is very sweet, with a bit of a tropical flavor. The Honey Orange is a sweet, crisp, light orange-fleshed honeydew. Enjoy!

Tomatoes are in abundance right now. Here are a few preservation tips for the bounty.

1) Tomatoes freeze easily. You can halve or quarter them, remove cores, and put into a ziploc freezer bag. Squeeze out the excess air and place in the freezer. They can be used for soups & stews in the winter. When thawed, the skins slip off easily.

2) Tomatoes can also be dried. Core tomatoes and slice about 1/4 inch thick. Place in dehydrator or convection oven at 145 degrees and dry until they are leathery. Store in sealed bags or jars. These can be crumbled into salads or pasta dishes. To rehydrate, place some in a small bowl and pour boiling water over just to cover dried tomatoes. Let cool and drain. They have excellent flavor and take up very little space.

3) Roasted Tomato Sauce is very easy to make, and delicious. The sauce can be frozen in pint or quart containers or canned for long term storage. There are two recipes on the website - a new one for making a small batch for dinner and/or freezing, Fresh Roasted Tomato Sauce, as well as a larger recipe with canning instructions, Roasted Tomato Sauce for Canning


2nds: 2nds tomatoes- both reds and heirlooms - are still available in the barn each pickup day. $1.25/lb. Now is the time to freeze or can your tomato sauce, salsa, quartered or halved tomatoes, etc. Please ask Heidi if you would like a bulk amount.


Cooperative Shares:  Pizza and cheese shares this week.



THE HARVEST

Red potatoes

Cantaloupe, Honeydew, and Canary melons

Heirloom tomatoes

Red tomatoes

White and/or Red onions

Garlic

Green Peppers

Eggplant

Red Beets

Zucchini & Summer Squash

Cucumbers



UPICK

Paste tomatoes, Cherry tomatoes, Hot peppers, Flowers, and Herbs

COMING SOON

Edamame, red & orange peppers


RECIPES: Here is a wonderful recipe for melon contributed by a CSA member, Cantaloupe Drizzled with Lemon Cardamom Yogurt Sauce. It calls for cantaloupe but I think would also be delicious with the honeydew and canary melons.

This recipe for Fresh Roasted Tomato Sauce I developed the other night, based on the recipe I use for canning tomato sauce. It is very easy since all the veggies for the sauce are roasted in the oven and then pureed or chopped finely in the food processor. The roasting really intensifies the flavors and cooks off excess liquid so the whole thing was done in half an hour. 

I think this recipe for Cool Summer Beet Soup,which is pureed with yogurt, sounds delicious and so pretty! Enjoy!


As always, if you need an idea for the produce in your share, check our Recipe Page! You can search by vegetable!

 

Your farmers,


John and Aimee Good

Quiet Creek Farm

Posted 7/31/2013 6:50am by John and Aimee Good.

 

CARROTS

Carrots were on the harvest list for this week, however they will not be in the share this week. We apologize and wanted to let you know why. We did attempt to harvest carrots yesterday morning for the share. We had a full bed ready to dig. However, when we went to dig them, we discovered that the entire bed of carrots was ruined. They had started to rot. Full -grown carrots sit fairly deep in the ground, and since we have had so much rain recently (4 inches plus last week) the soils have not drained fully and the carrots have been essentially sitting in water for a week. Carrots are quite susceptible to rot in very wet soils. We were very disappointed to have lost this entire planting, and we are sorry that there will be no carrots in the share this week.


There are two more plantings in that field, which are still small. So hopefully if the soils drain and we do not get too much more rain, we will be able to harvest from those plantings. They would be ready in a few weeks.
We also have several beds of fall carrots planted, for harvest in September and October. We actually just had to re-seed the second planting of fall carrots yesterday, as well as some of the fall beets, as the seeds were washed away in the heavy storm we got over a week ago.We suspected that the seeds washed after the storm, but we waited a week and a half to check for signs of germination before spading in the bed and re-seeding it.


This is why we plant so many crops, in so many successions. Although it is frustrating to lose any crop after putting so much work into it, and carrots in particular are one of the most labor-intensive crops on the farm, we have many more crops on the farm which had a wonderful harvest yesterday. So the share is still beautiful and bountiful, which lessens the sting of the loss. In particular, the tomatoes are doing very well; the high tunnel is still going strong and the heirlooms from the field are starting to ripen now. Also the yield from the first potato digging was one of our best ever, and the new red potatoes are so delicious.We are grateful that we have been afforded such a bountiful harvest season thus far.


Enjoy your share of the harvest this week!



Your farmers,


John and Aimee Good

Quiet Creek Farm

Posted 7/29/2013 2:24pm by John and Aimee Good.


FARM NOTES: Hooray - the first potatoes of the season are here. In this picture from last season, John is harvesting the potatoes with the mechanical digger. However the first potatoes will be hand-dug this year, as the ground is still too wet from the heavy rains to use the tractor. Hand-digging several hundred pounds of potatoes is a challenging task indeed. As you enjoy these wonderful fresh spuds, think of the soils that nourished the plants, the rains that watered them, the sunlight that fed them, and the hands that dug each one.

Another new crop in the harvest is the cantaloupes or muskmelons. Technically, these varieties are muskmelons, named for their richly sweet aroma. Unlike grocery store melons, these are allowed to ripen on the vine and are picked when their color turns and they slip easily from the vine. They can be stored on the counter at room temperature for several days, but should be eaten while still firm, before any soft spots develop. By their nature, muskmelons vary a bit in flavor and sweetness, but all should be tasty. They are great for slicing and eating off the rind. But also check out the delicious recipes below for sorbet, smoothies, and bread.


2nds: 2nds tomatoes are still available in the barn each pickup day.


Cooperative Shares:  Chicken shares this week.



THE HARVEST

New potatoes

Cantaloupe

Heirloom tomatoes

Red tomatoes

Carrots - orange & Purple Haze

Sweet white onions

Garlic

Green Peppers

Eggplant

Red Beets

Zucchini & Summer Squash

Cucumbers



UPICK

Paste tomatoes, Cherry tomatoes, Hot peppers, Flowers, and Herbs

COMING SOON

Edamame, red & orange peppers


RECIPES: If you are getting a backlog of beets, try out this recipe for Pickled Beets. You can make a small batch and just put them in the fridge. Allow flavors to develop for at least 2 days before opening, but a week is best. After eating the beets, place hard-boiled eggs into the leftover juice to make delicious Red Beet Eggs.

Cantaloupe is a favorite of John and I, but our kids much prefer watermelon. However they do love Melon smoothies, Easy Melon Sorbet, and Cantaloupe bread. Try these out if melons are not your thing, or just for something different. They are all delicious recipes.


As always, if you need an idea for the produce in your share, check our Recipe Page! You can search by vegetable!

 

Your farmers,


John and Aimee Good

Quiet Creek Farm

Posted 7/23/2013 5:51pm by John and Aimee Good.


I would like to take a moment to explain to you, our rationale behind the sale of certain "extra" crops to members.

In general, we do pick all our crops completely and share them equally among members. We strongly believe in the basic tenet of the CSA - "share in the risk and share in the bounty by being a member of a farm."

There are certain instances where we may offer extras of a crop, when there are not enough to spread equally among all the members. For example, the 2nds tomatoes. We harvest tomatoes twice a week and there are always a few with bad spots, sun scald, etc. In the past we composted these or fed them to Rodale's or Ledamete Grass's pigs. After receiving requests from members for bulk produce for canning/preserving, we decided it made more sense for everyone to offer these 2nds tomatoes, which are only imperfect, not bad, to members for this purpose. However, since we cannot give them to everyone, as it is only 1-2 buckets each day, to be fair we offer them at a greatly discounted price to those who are interested. And the reason we sort out the 2nds in the first place is because we strive to give our members the best produce, such that everyone can pick up any item out of the bin and be satisfied.

Another time when we may offer extras is in the case of two successions of a crop overlapping, so that our harvest is doubled for a short time, and the yield is so much that we feel it would be burdensome for our members. For example, earlier this summer two plantings of cucumbers overlapped and members were getting 6-8 cucumbers a week, and not everyone was taking all their weekly allotment. So we decided to offer some of this excess to members who like to put up pickles for the winter. In this instance, we felt that our members were getting all they could take weekly in cucumbers, and so instead of composting the extra cucumbers leftover from the pickup days, we offered them at a discounted wholesale price to members. Since we could not provide bulk quantities of pickling cukes to everyone, and in fact I imagine not everyone wants to can pickles, we offered them for sale to be fair to all the members.

The offer of beets illustrates the third reason why we may sell extras of a crop. We planted three successions of beets in the spring. They all grew very well. We picked all the nice beets out of the first planting and have moved on to picking from the second and third successions, as they are ready now - with beautiful sweet beets with the nicest tops. There are still a few straggler beets left in the first planting, but their tops are not nice anymore and they are not going to be as sweet as the newer plantings. We have plenty to give everyone a nice bunch of beets every week from the newer plantings, for several weeks to come. Normally we would just till in the few remaining beets from the first planting. But since we received a request from a member for extra bulk beets for pickling, we decided to offer these beets - which are really 2nds now -  on a first come, first served basis to those members who would like pickling beets. We feel that 1 bunch/week of beets is more than ample, and in past years we have not given beets in the share every week, as they are one of those vegetables that not everyone loves. So we feel that our members are already getting a bounty of this crop, and that by picking some of the leftovers for members who want to do pickling rather than tilling them in is better for everyone. 

When we do offer "extras" it is at a low, wholesale price for two reasons. Since we cannot offer them to everyone, we feel it is only fair to sell them to those who want them.
We sell the "extras" at a low price, wholesale or less, to give our those who want them a "deal", out of respect for the relationship of our members to the farm.

I hope this fully explains our reasoning for offering "extras" of certain crops. We would never hold back on a crop in order to sell it to our members. We fully appreciate and respect the relationship between our members and us - the farmers. We value our members tremendously and appreciate everyone who makes this important commitment to our farm. In fact we began this practice of offering extras because of member feedback from our year-end surveys and email comments. Thanks for taking the time to read our thoughts. We hope this has answered any questions anyone may have.




Your farmers,


John and Aimee Good

Quiet Creek Farm

Posted 7/23/2013 7:54am by John and Aimee Good.

BEETS

This has been the best beet crop ever at our farm. We hope you are enjoying these sweet beauties. We now have extra beets available for pre-order for members. Pickled beets are a great way to put up beets for the winter. I will send a recipe for canning pickled beets later today or tomorrow. To place an order for beets, please respond to this email with your name, pickup day, and desired amount. The price is $1.50/lb (wholesale price).

 

Bread & Egg Shares

We have been having some discrepancies with the bread and egg shares, and while we are sorting this out, we ask that everone check in with Heidi to pick up their bread and egg shares. Please get your bread &/or eggs from the usual place in the barn, then stop at Heidi's counter to check off the sheet for Bread & Egg Shares. Thanks very much for your cooperation!



Your farmers,


John and Aimee Good

Quiet Creek Farm

Posted 7/22/2013 12:54pm by John and Aimee Good.


FARM NOTES: Yeah - the first carrots of the season are in. There are two varieties in these bunches - a sweet orange variety called Mokum and a purple variety called Purple Haze. The purple carrots have a reddish orange interior and are beautiful when sliced. They are also sweet raw, but their flavor is even better when cooked. The farmer's favorite method: cook them in a saucepan covered with a lid, with a nice dollop of butter,  over medium low heat until tender, and then drizzle lightly with maple syrup or honey. To keep your carrots crisp in the fridge they must be stored in a sealed plastic bag. Ideally separate them from the tops first. They will lose moisture and become soft if just left in the crisper drawer.

Also new this week are the sweet white onions. These are a mild onion. Enjoy them raw sliced on sandwiches or in tomato salads. Try roasting them with beets in foil packets on the grill, and saute them with summer squash, etc. They will keep for a short time in a dry, dark location at room temp, like a cupboard or covered basket. For long term storage they should be transferred to the fridge. Because they are a sweet onion, they do not keep for months as the winter storage onions do. The general rule is: the spicier the onion, the longer the storage.

2nds: 2nds tomatoes are still available in the barn each pickup day.

A Note about Cooperative Shares! Please make sure that you check off your name when picking up your share. If you switch your pickup day within the week, your eggs & cheese will be available, but you cannot get your bread, fruit, chicken, and pizza shares that day. They will come on your normal day and we will hold them for you to pick up on your next regular pickup day.

Cooperative Shares: Chicken & cheese shares this week.



THE HARVEST

Carrots - orange & Purple Haze

Sweet white onions

Fresh garlic

Green Peppers

Eggplant

Red Beets

Zucchini & Summer Squash

Cucumbers

Tomatoes



UPICK

Hot peppers, Flowers, Green beans, Cherry tomatoes, Basil, Cilantro, Parsley, Dill and Perennial herbs: chives, oregano, thyme, sage, garlic chives

COMING SOON

Melons


RECIPES: Two sweet ideas for your veggie share: Zucchini-Blueberry Bread and Secret Chocolate Cake (the secret ingredient is beets!). For a unique carrot salad, try Asian Carrot Slaw (you could substitute chives or finely chopped sweet onions for the scallions in this recipe). One of my favorite summer salads is Tomato-Cucumber Salad. 


As always, if you need an idea for the produce in your share, check our Recipe Page! You can search by vegetable!

 

Your farmers,


John and Aimee Good

Quiet Creek Farm

Posted 7/15/2013 6:31pm by John and Aimee Good.

 

 


The tomato harvest has increased to the point that 2nds tomatoes are now available, for canning, freezing, saucing etc. The tomatoes are harvested every Monday and Thursday, and the 2nds from each harvest will be available at the subsequent pickup day, Tuesday and Friday. We will have a container available in the barn. They will be "first come, first serve" until they are gone each day. Just ask Heidi if you would like some. The price will be $1.25/lb, which is half the wholesale price for tomatoes.

Thank you!


Your farmers,


John and Aimee Good

Quiet Creek Farm

Posted 7/15/2013 2:45pm by John and Aimee Good.


FARM NOTES: Hot, Hot, Hot! The lettuce season is officially over, and the summer harvest season is on! The tomatoes are really starting to come in. It is time for tomato salads, tomato pies, fresh salsa, and juicy tomato sandwiches. Enjoy these summer treats!

New this week- green peppers and a bit of Asian eggplant. We expect to have sweet onions and cantaloupe soon.  The garlic is ready for harvest, and you will get fresh garlic in your share this week. This garlic is very tasty, strong, and delicious. You can store it in a cool, dry place or in the refrigerator, as it is pulled directly from the field and has "moist" papers. The farm crew will begin to harvest all the garlic this week and start to dry it for long-term storage.

And now, I want to put in a good word for the yellow summer squash. Many people seem to pick over it in favor of the zucchini. Perhaps this is because of more familiarity with zucchini, or because more recipes call for zucchini, or of a memory of eating an old variety crookneck squash with big chewy seeds and mealy flesh. Let me assure you that our yellow squashes are not like the old crookneck squashes. First of all, we pick them on the younger side so that their flesh is tender and the seeds are not overly large. Secondly, the newer varieties of yellow squash are very tender and mild, and are more akin to a yellow zucchini. So I would like to encourage you to try some more of the yellow squashes. A more colorful plate is always a nice thing. And yellow squash can replace zucchini in any recipe. Grated yellow squash also blends into dishes very well. For example, whenever I make tacos - which is a frequent dinner in our house in the summertime- I add grated yellow squash to the beans or chicken for the taco filling. It can be added to soups, pancakes, breads, etc. Use your imagination and enjoy! And check the recipes below for some more ideas for yellow squash.


THE HARVEST

Fresh garlic

Green Peppers

Asian eggplant - small amounts from first picking

Red Beets

Zucchini & Summer Squash

Garlic Scapes

Cucumbers

Tomatoes



UPICK

Flowers, Green beans, Basil, Cilantro, Parsley, Dill and Perennial herbs: chives, oregano, thyme, sage, garlic chives

COMING SOON

Cherry tomatoes, sweet onions, melons


RECIPES: Spaghetti with Zucchini and Lemon is an old favorite of mine, which features both zucchini and summer squash with a simple spaghetti flavored with lemon juice and parmesan cheese.

Simple Sauteed Yellow Squash is a tender, sweet, satisfying dish that is so simple to make. This is the way I most often make summer squash.

Syrian Beet Salad is delicious with flavors of fresh cilantro, cumin, garlic, and lemon juice.


As always, if you need an idea for the produce in your share, check our Recipe Page! You can search by vegetable!

 

Your farmers,


John and Aimee Good

Quiet Creek Farm

Posted 7/8/2013 1:41pm by John and Aimee Good.


FARM NOTES: How are these vegetables going to travel from our farm to your home? Please remember to bring your own bags, baskets, coolers, etc. to transport your produce, including bags for lettuces and greens. And if you have a collection of clean plastic bags, please feel free to bring those to the farm and place them in the wooden boxes at the sign-in table, to share with other members, for the days when we forget our bags! 


The tomato harvest should be increasing this week. Hopefully we will have some eggplant and pepper soon. The garlic harvest is also not far off. We are on our way to more summer crops! Sadly, the lettuces will be finished shortly. But we do have some very nice tender cabbages this week, which will make lovely slaws for this hot weather. And there are so many ways to make salads in the summer. Check out the recipes below for Beet Salad, Broccoli Salad, and Zucchini-Tahini Dressing!

Cooperative Shares: Cheese shares are delivered this week!

NEW- We will have extra cheeses from Hillside acres available for purchase from the display cooler!

NEW - You may have notice that we have a new dairy producer for the farm store - Wholesome Dairy Farms yogurts, kefir, and greek yogurts are made fresh with milk from a small herd of grass-fed cows, located in Douglassville, PA.


PAYMENTS: Final payments are overdue. ALL BALANCES MUST BE PAID IN ORDER TO PICK UP YOUR SHARE THIS WEEK!

Please check the Customer Balance sheet here, or in the barn to make sure your balance is paid in full. Please let me know if you have any questions or problems with your balance. Thank you!



THE HARVEST

Red Beets

Lettuce heads

Zucchini & Summer Squash

Garlic Scapes

Cucumbers

Tomatoes

Tendersweet Cabbage

Broccoli - last picking


UPICK

Green beans, Cilantro, Parsley, Dill and Perennial herbs: chives, oregano, thyme, sage, garlic chives

COMING SOON

Garlic, Green Peppers, Asian eggplant


RECIPES:  Although the broccoli harvest is on the way out, if you have a backlog of broccoli in your fridge as I did, this Broccoli Salad is a great recipe. I especially like it because it is a healthy variation on this traditional picnic favorite - using plain yogurt instead of mayonnaise.

I love beets in all forms, but this Beet Salad may turn the heads of even those who shy away from beets.

My mother passed me this recipe for Zucchini-Tahini Dressing which is very tasty and a lovely shade of green. It makes a delicious salad dressing, or you can make it into a dip by substituting the olive oil with cream cheese or sour cream. Enjoy!


As always, if you need an idea for the produce in your share, check our Recipe Page! You can search by vegetable!

 

Your farmers,


John and Aimee Good

Quiet Creek Farm

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The Good Farm is a certified organic farm raising vegetables, berries, flowers, and herbs for a CSA (Community Supported Agriculture) and farmer's market. Farmers John and Aimee Good specialize in providing the best quality and most flavorful varieties of the vegetables you love to eat- the staples! We have happy members - over 70% return every year!

 

Many customers say they eat healthier, feel better, learn to cook new things, save money, and even lose weight by joining the farm. We are all connected to farming, as we are all eaters. Experience seasonal eating. Support a type of farm that you can believe in; the kind you imagined as a child; where people pick the produce by hand, the soils are thriving, and the fields are full of life. Become a CSA member or visit The Good Farm at the Trexlertown Farmer's Market. Because "it's all GOOD!"

 

"Eating is an agricultural act" - Wendell Berry

8112 Church Rd.
Germansville, PA 18053
484-262-0675
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