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Posted 8/6/2019 6:35am by John and Aimee Good.

The Rise and Fall of Tomatoes. . .

There is a cycle to this sign of summer on the farm, and we are  in the peak of harvest!

In most fruiting crops, like tomatoes, squash & zucchini, cucumbers, etc. there is a harvest cycle that resembles a half moon - A slow start, leading up to a peak of harvest, and a gradual decline. Tomato harvest follows this cycle more than any other fruiting crop.

We have to plant enough tomatoes to provide a good amount for most of the season, but there will inevitably be a few weeks where there is only a few tomatoes, as well as a few weeks where there is a boatload of tomatoes!

Well, it's boatload time folks!

This is the natural cycle of the plants. Being part of a means CSA you get to experience the flow of the farm season.

All this bounty just makes me feel rich!

But it can be overwhelming if you don't know what to do with it . . . so check out this week's storage tips for summer veggies, and freezing/canning/drying tips for tomatoes!

And Recipes! Enter TOMATO into the search box for plenty of ideas!


THE HARVEST

New - White Sweet Corn!

Red &/or Orange tomatoes

Melons (Watermelon and/OR Muskmelon)

Red potatoes

Silver slicer  &/or Lime Crisp cucumbers

Sweet white onions

Carrots

Zucchini and/or Summer squash-

Salad mix

Garlic

Eggplant and/or green peppers

Coming Soon: Sweet peppers, yellow sweet corn

EXTRA SHARES: Eggs, Bread, Fruit, & weekly Coffee shares this week!

FRUIT SHARES: Peaches should be taken out of the bag and left out on the counter to soften for best flavor. Varieties this week - Coral Star - big, beautiful and very flavorful! Some Flavorburst as well - more mild flavor but very sweet.

 

Upick at the Farm:  Herbs - Basil, Cilantro, Dill, Sage, Marjoram & Parsley-  pick as needed

Cherry tomatoes - 1 pint per share

Hot peppers - some Jalapeno & Hot Wax

Cut flowers - 15 stems per share

Note: More green beans & edamame coming soon - Mexican bean beetles are bad this year and this is affecting the bean harvest, so yields are down.

U-PICK GARDEN HOURS: Tuesdays and Fridays, 8 am - 7 pm. Wednesday and Saturday mornings, 9 am - noon. 

*Below, this is a very common tomato pest, the tomato hornworm, a large very hungry green caterpillar who feasts on the green tomatoes themselves.  You can see he is not looking so good.
The body of the hornworm is covered with the cocoons of a parasitic wasp
. The female Braconid wasp, Cotesia congregatus, lays her eggs under the skin of the hornworm, and the larvae feed on the insides of the hornworm, eating their way out and spinning these white cocoons that you see. A bit gross, but really cool!

We do not have to do anything to take care of these hungry caterpillars, except provide a good home for beneficial insects such as this parasitic wasp to live on the farm - harmony in nature!

More ways below, to find what you need to know:

CSA Pickup/ Upick Hours  - lists hours for all pickup sites, as well as Farm Upick times

CSA Pickup Changes & more - change contact info, check your balance, make a payment, schedule a vacation hold and double pickup, switch to a different pickup day or location for a week, etc. (To permanently change your pickup location, you need to contact Aimee.)

News & Blog - Missed an email? Want to review an old one? You can find all our email posts here in our blog archive.

Recipes - Every week we post new recipes highlighting the vegetables in your share. Most recent additions will be at the top of the page, but we have quite a lot of recipes on this page, and you can search by vegetable to find many more ideas!





Your farmers,

John and Aimee Good

The Good Farm

8112 Church Road

Germansville PA 18053

484-262-0675

www.goodfarmcsa.com

facebook.com/goodfarmcsa

instagram.com/goodfarmcsa

Posted 8/5/2019 11:14am by John and Aimee Good.

Tips on Storing the Summer Harvest 

To download this as a pdf, click here.

Cucumbers - Store loose in the crisper drawer of your fridge, not in plastic bag or container unless cut. Will keep for 1-2 weeks. Great for preserving and making fresh pickles, lacto-fermented pickles, or canned pickles! 

Eggplant - Eggplant prefers to be stored at warmer temperatures than the fridge. We keep it in our “warm” cooler in the barn, which is set to 50 degrees. However, for household storage, you can store it on the counter for 1-4 days. It may start to get wrinkly skins after that time, but it still fine to use. You can also keep them in the fridge, but it may get dark spots, cold damage, after about 4-5 days.  

Greens - Leafy greens need to have their moisture content controlled. You do not want them to be too wet, or they can get slimy, yet if they are too dry, they will wilt. The dry air of a refrigerator will pull moisture out of greens if left exposed to the air, causing them to wilt. So the best storage is in an air-tight container, ie. a plastic bag, a tupperware container, etc. You may want to place a towel in with them, a dry one if they are really wet, or a damp one if they are dry.

Onions & Garlic - These alliums should be stored in a dry, cool, dark location. In a basket in a kitchen cupboard is a fine location. Sweet onions should be used within 3 weeks. Red onions should keep for 1-2 months. Garlic will keep for many months!

Melons - Watermelons can be kept on the counter until ready to eat. Store any uneaten portion in the refrigerator. Muskmelons can be kept on the counter for 1-2 days only. If not going to eat within 1-2 days, it is best to store them in the fridge. We pick them fully ripe, when they turn color and slip easily from the vine, and they will continue to ripen and can become soft and over-ripe if left out for too long. Muskmelon can also be easily frozen, for “Easy Melon Sorbet” or “Melon Smoothies”. (Recipes are available on our website!)

Peppers - Peppers should be stored in the crisper drawer of the fridge, loose, not in a bag. They will keep for 1-2 weeks. They also freeze beautifully. For short term storage, just de-seed and chop and put into freezer bags. For long-term storage (and highest nutritional content), it is best to blanch in hot water first, then cool in an ice water bath, dry and freeze on a tray. Then transfer to freezer bags, squeezing out the air.

 Potatoes -  Potatoes prefer cool, dry, and dark storage. They can be kept in a brown bag or basket lined with a plastic bag to hold the dirt, in a kitchen cupboard, or dry basement cupboard. Potatoes keep well if unwashed until ready to use. We generally just rub the dirt off before including them in CSA shares. You can wash them when you take your veggies home for use that week, or store them dirty until ready to cook.

 Roots - Roots are grown in the ground, and they prefer a humid environment as well, about 80-90% humidity for most. Roots cannot be stored loose in the fridge, even in a crisper drawer, or they will lose their crispness and become rubbery. They can be stored loosely in a bag or wrapped in a damp towel and stored in an air-tight container. Roots stored properly should keep for several weeks, including beets, carrots, etc. If edible greens are attached, such as beet greens, it is best to remove greens and store separately.

Sweet Corn - It is best to eat your sweet corn soon after getting your share, within 1-2 days it will be at its sweetest. Store in the fridge until ready to eat! Any unused portions can easily be frozen after blanching in hot water and cutting off the cob.  

Tomatoes - For maximum flavor, tomatoes should not be stored at less than 50 degrees. A normal refrigerator is 40 degrees, so it is best to store them on the counter. They should keep for a few days up to a week depending on how ripe they are. 

Tomatoes are very easy to freeze! Just core and half or quarter tomatoes and pack into quart-size plastic ziploc freezer bags, squeezing out excess air before sealing. In the winter, you can thaw and use in any recipe calling for a can of tomatoes. (Skins remove easily when thawed.) I love to make tomato soup with these in the winter, and it has the most amazing fresh tomato flavor! I cook 1-2 bags of frozen, thawed tomatoes with onion, garlic and 1-2 cups of broth. I puree it with a stick blender, and add salt, pepper and herbs, and sometimes sour cream. Amazing!

Zucchini & summer squash - Zucchini & summer squash actually prefer to be stored slightly warmer than the fridge, about 50 degrees is ideal. However, since we don’t generally have a 50 degree space in our modern houses, you can either leave out on the counter in a cool house for up to a few days, or store loose in the crisper drawer. They do not need to be in a bag or container. These should keep for 1-2 weeks.  



Your farmers,

John and Aimee Good

The Good Farm

8112 Church Road

Germansville PA 18053

484-262-0675

www.goodfarmcsa.com

facebook.com/goodfarmcsa

instagram.com/goodfarmcsa

Posted 7/30/2019 6:20pm by John and Aimee Good.


Picking melons - Everyone seems to have some trick for picking out a good melon. Well, no tricks are needed when it comes to our melons. 

Cause we only pick 'em ripe!

For muskmelons (cantaloupe), the color change on the fruit is the obvious clue. The melons start green. When they ripen, they turn that lovely light orange color. Then they should slip from the vine when tugged.

Picking at this stage gives you melons with true ripe flavor. But since the melons cannot handle shipping in this state, you never get melons picked ripe in the grocery store. Which is why I NEVER liked cantaloupe until I worked on a farm. Now I LOVE it! 

In PA, we actually grow muskmelon, not cantaloupe, but that is the more common name. But when you smell the fragrant aroma of these muskmelons, you will know why they get their name!

For watermelons, we watch for several clues. First the plants themselves begin to die back slightly. Then we check the fruits. The tendril opposite the watermelon should turn brown and dry up. That is an indicator of ripeness. We also pick a few from the patch to test them, as watermelons tend to ripen more evenly than muskmelons.

Yes, our watermelons have seeds. The sugars are concentrated around the seeds, which is why ours are so sweet!  Enjoy good old-fashioned flavor with these varieties.

THE HARVEST

New -Melons! (Watermelon and/OR Cantaloupe)

New - Red potatoes! The digger worked beautifully! Lots of nice red potatoes. Check out a video of it in action on our Instagram page.

Silver slicer  &/or Lime Crisp cucumbers

Sweet white onions

Red &/or Orange tomatoes -Peak tomato harvest this week!

Carrots

Zucchini and/or Summer squash

Salad mix

Garlic

Possibly eggplant and/or Asian eggplant

*This is our best estimate of the week's harvest and is subject to change.

Coming Soon: Green peppers, yellow sweet corn

EXTRA SHARES: Eggs, Cheese, Fruit, Coffee & Biweekly coffee shares this week!

FRUIT SHARES: PEACHES ARE IN! Peaches should be taken out of the bag and left out on the counter to soften for best flavor. 

 

Upick at the Farm:  Herbs - Basil, Cilantro, Dill, Sage, Marjoram & Parsley-  pick as needed

Cherry tomatoes - 1/2 pint per small, 1 pint per regular share

Green beans - 1 quart per share

Cut flowers - 15 stems per share

U-PICK GARDEN HOURS: Tuesdays and Fridays, 8 am - 7 pm. Wednesday and Saturday mornings, 9 am - noon. 

*Below, the U-pick flower garden at the farm is in full bloom! The monarchs and other butterflies are enjoying it as much as we are! 




Your farmers,

John and Aimee Good

The Good Farm

8112 Church Road

Germansville PA 18053

484-262-0675

www.goodfarmcsa.com

facebook.com/goodfarmcsa

instagram.com/goodfarmcsa

Posted 7/24/2019 6:44am by John and Aimee Good.


We received over 4 and a half inches of rain in the storms this week!

We were spared any serious damage thankfully, and our shale soils up here by the mountain drain very well.

But, the soil is too wet for digging potatoes.

Hopefully for next week!

 

Your farmers,

John and Aimee Good

The Good Farm

8112 Church Road

Germansville PA 18053

484-262-0675

www.goodfarmcsa.com

facebook.com/goodfarmcsa

instagram.com/goodfarmcsa

Posted 7/16/2019 11:00am by John and Aimee Good.

Dear %%user-firstname%%,

Your pickup is %%pickup-time%%, %%pickup-location%%.

*Any schedule changes? That will be listed here . . . %%scheduled-actions%% Corrections? Please let me know.

Need to schedule a pickup change or vacation hold? Click here.

Deadline to schedule online is Monday of the week you need to change, otherwise email Aimee for last-minute changes.

 

Knee-high by the 4th of July? This sweet corn is well past Farmer John's knees!

The old saying goes - the corn should be knee-high by the 4th of July to get a good harvest.

Well, it looks like we will be in for a good early harvest this year!

Farm apprentice David Darling took this photo on the 4th of July, for the record.

Farmer John developed a new corn planting strategy this winter, after attending educational workshops at the PASA conference.

The goal is for 3 plantings of sweet corn, to extend the entire picking season, for a total of 7-8 weeks of corn this summer.

I mean really, can you ever have enough sweet corn?

So far it looks good. The first planting is filling out the ears and hopefully we will start picking by the end of the week!

 

THE HARVEST

New - Fresh garlic! (fresh-dug garlic has a wonderfully strong flavor, enjoy!)

Carrots - check out that carrot Aimee's holding- about 18"!

Red &/or Orange tomatoes

Zucchini and/or Summer squash

Salad mix

Scallions

New Red potatoes (hopefully! - the farm crew is digging these right now, fingers crossed!)

Coming Soon: Sweet corn, green peppers, sweet onions, eggplant!

 

Upick at the Farm:  Herbs - Cilantro, Dill, Sage, Marjoram & Parsley

Green beans - 1 pint per small share, 1 quart per regular

Cut flowers - 5 stems

U-PICK GARDEN HOURS: Tuesdays and Fridays, 8 am - 7 pm. Wednesday and Saturday mornings, 9 am - noon. 

COOPERATIVE SHARES: Fruit, Eggs, Coffee & Biweekly coffee shares this week! Fruit is 1 pint of blueberries this week! Be sure to check the list and take your blueberry pint for all fruit shares only!

NOTE: No fruit next week, but peaches will start the following week.

 

*Below, Farmer John and farm apprentice Kailey Graver are forking the carrots for harvest. As the carrots get larger, the forking gets tougher! 

We hope you enjoy these farm-fresh carrots. This is one of our favorite treats from the fields.

The skins are so thin and tender, they do not even need peeling. A good washing with a vegetable scrubber is sufficient.

And because they are so fresh, the skins are still sweet. They only become bitter in long storage, which is why we peel the carrots from the grocery store - they're old!

The farm crew laughs, but I often just rub off the dirt and enjoy one as a snack after harvest!

More ways below, to find what you need to know:

CSA Pickup/ Upick Hours  - lists hours for all pickup sites, as well as Farm Upick times

CSA Pickup Changes & more - change contact info, check your balance, make a payment, schedule a vacation hold and double pickup, switch to a different pickup day or location for a week, etc. (To permanently change your pickup location, you need to contact Aimee.)

News & Blog - Missed an email? Want to review an old one? You can find all our email posts here in our blog archive.

Recipes - Every week we post new recipes highlighting the vegetables in your share. Most recent additions will be at the top of the page, but we have quite a lot of recipes on this page, and you can search by vegetable to find many more ideas!


Your farmers,

John and Aimee Good

The Good Farm

8112 Church Road

Germansville PA 18053

484-262-0675

www.goodfarmcsa.com

facebook.com/goodfarmcsa

instagram.com/goodfarmcsa

Posted 7/9/2019 8:23am by John and Aimee Good.

Bringing in the garlic!    BULK GARLIC HARVEST 2019

It's time. Every year, right around the 4th of July, the garlic is ready for harvest.

Fresh garlic must be pulled from the ground, cleaned & bunched, and transported to the greenhouse for drying.

We put the shadecloth on the greenhouse and keep the fans running to create a good environment for drying down the garlic.

After a few weeks, the garlic is dry and cured, and we can cut the heads from the stems. Then it is sorted, and some is saved for seed to be planted in the fall again.

And the cycle of yearly planting and harvest continues. . .

Here's to wonderful Good Farm German Extra Hardy garlic! 

So flavorful, with nice big cloves! Can't wait!!!

 

THE HARVEST at The Good Farm

New - Mini cabbage! (tender little cabbages, just right for a single meal!)

Red beets

Carrot bunch

Red or Orange tomatoes

Zucchini and/or Summer squash

Salad mix OR Head lettuce

Broccoli

Garlic scapes

Scallions

Choice: Kale, Swiss Chard, Radishes, Turnips, or Cucumbers

Coming Soon: Sweet corn, green peppers, sweet onions, fresh garlic!

Upick at the farm :  Herbs - Cilantro, Dill, Sage & Parsley

Green beans & cut flowers coming soon!

U-PICK GARDEN HOURS: Tuesdays and Fridays, 8 am - 7 pm. Wednesday and Saturday mornings, 9 am - noon. 

COOPERATIVE SHARES: Eggs, Coffee shares this week! Fruit is coming soon!

 

*Below, Farmer John instructs the crew as they prepare to harvest broccoli. Broccoli is one of the more challenging crops to harvest, as it takes a practiced eye to judge when the broccoli crown is ready to pick.

The crown must rise up out of the plant and begin to present itself, the bead of the head must begin to soften and open a bit, and the color must be bright.

But if you wait too long, the heads will open too far, and start the transformation into broccoli flowers!

 

More ways below, to find what you need to know:

CSA Pickup/ Upick Hours  - lists hours for all pickup sites, as well as Farm Upick times

CSA Pickup Changes & more - change contact info, check your balance, make a payment, schedule a vacation hold and double pickup, switch to a different pickup day or location for a week, etc. (To permanently change your pickup location, you need to contact Aimee.)

News & Blog - Missed an email? Want to review an old one? You can find all our email posts here in our blog archive.

Recipes - Every week we post new recipes highlighting the vegetables in your share. Most recent additions will be at the top of the page, but we have quite a lot of recipes on this page, and you can search by vegetable to find many more ideas!

 





Your farmers,

John and Aimee Good

The Good Farm

8112 Church Road

Germansville PA 18053

484-262-0675

www.goodfarmcsa.com

facebook.com/goodfarmcsa

instagram.com/goodfarmcsa

Posted 6/24/2019 2:16pm by John and Aimee Good.


All the recipes listed below, and many more, are on our Recipe Page. Use the search box on the right to look for a particular vegetable.

2  RECIPES FOR TURNIPS - IN CASE YOU NEED SOME IDEAS!

3 RECIPES FOR GARLIC SCAPES - ENJOY!

Cream of Turnip Soup

2 T. butter

1 bunch turnips, cut into chunks

1 onion, sliced

2 cloves garlic, minced

1 quart chicken or veg. broth

1/2 cup white wine, or more broth

1 medium potato, peeled and cut into chunks

1 cup half and half or light cream

1/2 tsp. salt

ground black pepper

1/4 tsp. ground nutmeg (optional)

1 T. olive oil

thinly sliced turnip greens or spinach, about 2-3 cups (optional)

In soup pot over medium heat, melt butter. Add onion and saute until translucent. Add garlic and saute for one minute more. Add wine and boil until reduced by half. Add turnips, broth, and potato. Bring to boil and then reduce to simmer. Cook for about 20-25 minutes, until veggies are tender. Remove from heat. Add cream and seasonings. Puree with immersion blender. Serve as is or continue below.

OPTIONAL: In a skillet, heat oil over medium heat. Add thinly sliced turnip greens or spinach and cook, stirring, until wilted. Top each bowl of soup with a dollop of turnip greens or spinach.

Butter-browned turnips (this is Farmer John's favorite way to eat turnips!)

1 bunch turnips, scrubbed

1-2 Tbsp. butter

sea salt

Optional additions: sugar snap peas (de-stemmed & cut in half), kale, turnip greens

Remove tops and roots from turnips and cut into 1/2 inch wedges. Melt butter in a heavy skillet over medium heat. Once melted, add turnips and sprinkle with sea salt. Cover with a lid and cook for about 5 minutes. Remove lid. Turnips should be browned on the bottom, but not burnt. Keep heat on medium and stir turnips for a few minutes to brown other sides slightly. If desired, add 2 handfuls of sugar snap peas, or 2 cups chopped kale or turnip greens, and cook uncovered 2 minutes more. Serve and enjoy.

White Bean & Garlic Scapes Dip

1/3 cup sliced garlic scapes (3 to 4)

1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice, more to taste

1/2 teaspoon coarse sea salt, more to taste

Ground black pepper to taste

1 can (15 ounces) cannellini beans, rinsed and drained

1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil, more for drizzling.

1. In a food processor, process garlic scapes with lemon juice, salt and pepper until finely chopped. Add cannellini beans and process to a rough purée.

2. With motor running, slowly drizzle olive oil through feed tube and process until fairly smooth. Pulse in 2 or 3 tablespoons water, or more, until mixture is the consistency of a dip. Add more salt, pepper and/or lemon juice, if desired.

3. Spread out dip on a plate, drizzle with olive oil, and sprinkle with more salt.

Yield: 1 1/2 cups.  Time: 15 minutes

Garlic Scape Pesto

  • 1/4 cup pine nuts
  • 3/4 cup coarsely chopped garlic scapes*
  • Juice and zest of 1/2 lemon
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • A few generous grinds of black pepper
  • 1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil
  • 1/4 cup grated Parmigiano Reggiano cheese
  • *Or use half scapes and half herbs such as basil, dill and chervil
  1. In a small, dry pan set over very low heat, lightly toast the pine nuts, stirring or tossing occasionally until just beginning to brown, about 2-3 minutes. Remove from the heat and let cool for a few minutes.
  2. Combine the scapes, pine nuts, lemon juice and zest, salt, and pepper in the bowl of a food processor fitted with the blade attachment. Pulse about 20 times, until fairly well combined. Pour in the olive oil slowly through the feed tube while the motor is running. When the oil is incorporated, transfer the pesto to a bowl and stir in the grated cheese.

    Note: If you plan to freeze the pesto, wait to add the cheese until after you've defrosted it.

    Excellent on crusty bread or crackers, in grilled cheese, on noodles. Also a great flavor boost for salad dressings, soups, and more.

     

    Pickled garlic scapes

    In its finished form, this pickle ends up tasting like a wonderfully garlicky dilly bean. If you like the combination of garlic and a snappy pickle, you'll be quite pleased with this one.

     
    • Yield:makes 1 pint
    • Active time: 30 minutes
    • Total time:1 week

     

    • 1/2 pound garlic scapes (approximately 3 bunches)
    • 1 teaspoon dill seed
    • 1/2 teaspoon whole black peppercorns
    • 3/4 cups apple cider vinegar
    • 3/4 cups water
    • 1 tablespoon pickling salt
     
    1. Trim the ends of the scapes, both the blossom end and the hard bit that formed at the original cut, and cut them into lengths that will fit in your jar. Prepare a small boiling water bath and a single pint jar. Place the dill and black peppercorns in the jar. Pack the trimmed scapes into the jar.

    2. Combine the vinegar, water and pickling salt in a pot and bring to a boil. Slowly pour the hot brine over the garlic scapes, leaving 1/2 inch headspace. Once the jar is full, tap the jar lightly to dislodge any air bubbles. Check the headspace again and add more brine if necessary.

    3. Wipe the rim, apply the lid and ring.

      For a fresh pickle - allow to cool and store in the fridge for 1 week before eating. Pickles will keep for several weeks in the fridge.

      For a canned pickle - shelf-stable until opened - Process in a hot water bath for 10 minutes. Let these pickles cure for at least a week before eating. Canned pickles should be eaten within 1 year. Pickles will last for several weeks in refrigerator after initial seal is broken.

 

Your farmers,

John and Aimee Good

The Good Farm

8112 Church Road

Germansville PA 18053

484-262-0675

www.goodfarmcsa.com

facebook.com/goodfarmcsa

instagram.com/goodfarmcsa

Posted 6/17/2019 2:05pm by John and Aimee Good.


All the recipes listed below, and many more, are on our Recipe Page.

Use the search box on the right to look for a particular vegetable.

We hope you enjoy using these recipes. Please feel free to share any recipes that you find and love with us! Thanks!

Quick Roasted Beets

*Many recipes for roasted beets advise roasting whole and then peeling, which takes an hour for roasting, plus cooling and peeling. I wanted a quicker way to enjoy roasted beets, so here's what I do:

 
1 bunch beets, scrubbed, peeled if desired, and cut into 3/4 inch cubes (Save greens for Beet Greens Recipe)
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 tsp. sea salt, or to taste
1 large or 2 small onions, peeled and thinly sliced in rings (optional)
 
Preheat oven to 400 F.
Toss beets, olive oil, salt and onions or other veg, if using, in a baking dish. Cover with a lid or tin foil and place in hot oven. Roast until beets are tender, about 25 minutes. A fork inserted into a beet cube should come out easily.
 
Variations: Use 1 head of peeled garlic cloves in place of the onions. Add several thinly sliced garlic scapes. Add cubed potatoes, carrot chunks, or parsnip chunks to the beets.
 
Note on peeling: When beets are fresh dug, with pretty bright skins, I often don't peel. I just scrub them well, and only peel the hairy parts.

Beet Greens Recipe

*adapted from http://www.simplyrecipes.com/recipes/beet_greens/

This recipe also works well with kale, chard, turnip, or other cooking greens.

  • Prep time: 5 minutes
  • Cook time: 25 minutes

Ingredients

  • 1 large bunch beet greens
  • 2-4 strips of thick cut bacon, chopped (or a tablespoon of bacon fat)
  • 1/4 cup chopped onion
  • 1 large garlic clove or 2 garlic scapes, minced
  • 1/4 cup water
  • 1 Tbsp granulated sugar or sucanat/rapadura sugar
  • 1/4 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes (optional)
  • 1-2 T. cider vinegar

Method

1 Wash the greens in a sink filled with cold water. Drain greens and wash a second time. Drain greens and cut away any heavy stems. Cut leaves into bite-sized pieces. Set aside.

2 In a large skillet or 3-qt saucepan, cook bacon until lightly browned on medium heat (or heat 1 Tbsp of bacon fat). Add onions, cook over medium heat 5 to 7 minutes, stirring occassionally, until onions soften and start to brown. Stir in garlic. Add water to the hot pan, stirring to loosen any particles from bottom of pan. Stir in sugar and red pepper. Bring mixture to a boil.

3 Add the beet greens, gently toss in the onion mixture so the greens are well coated. Reduce heat to low, cover and simmer for 5-10 minutes until the greens are tender. Stir in vinegar.

Yield: Serves 4.

NOTE: For a vegetarian version, I use olive oil and soy sauce, and skip the bacon and bacon fat.

Beet Dip -a pretty dip that even non-beet loves enjoy!

1 bunch beets, trimmed

1-2 garlic cloves, or 3 garlic scapes

1 1/2 cup whole Greek yogurt

1/4 teaspoon chili chipotle powder

1/4 cup olive oil

1/2 teaspoon salt

Feta cheese

Hazelnuts

Green onions

Shallots 

Put the beets in a small baking pan with a small amount of water. Roast in a 350 degree oven for 1 hour. Peel and cut in half. Add beets, garlic, yogurt, olive oil and chili powder in a food processor or blender and pulse until smooth. Garnish with feta, hazelnuts, shallots and green onions. Serve with chips or pita bread.

Farmer's Favorite Summer Squash

So creamy and delicious, this is always the first thing we make when summer squash comes in!

1 large or 2 medium summer squash, thinly sliced into rounds or half moons
2-3 T. butter
1/2 medium onion, sliced thinly
 salt & pepper to taste

Melt butter in large skillet. Add onion and cook just till tender. Add yellow squash and continue cooking over medium heat, stirring until squash begins to soften.
Cover and continue cooking over low heat until nice and tender (usually about 10-15 minutes).
I add lots of salt and pepper, stirring it in while cooking.

Serves 2-4.
 
 

Your farmers,

John and Aimee Good

The Good Farm

8112 Church Road

Germansville PA 18053

484-262-0675

www.goodfarmcsa.com

facebook.com/goodfarmcsa

instagram.com/goodfarmcsa

Posted 6/17/2019 2:00pm by John and Aimee Good.


Dear %%user-firstname%%,

Your pickup is

%%pickup-time%%, %%pickup-location%%

*Scheduled a pickup change? That will be listed here . . . %%scheduled-actions%% Corrections? Please let me know.

 

Peak Broccoli Harvest today!

Take a look at this beauty of a broccoli crown!

Yes, I'm showing it off to our resident photographer and farm apprentice extraordinaire David Darling!

 

Hard to believe, but each plant gives just one broccoli crown.

That's why we have so many rows planted!

These plants made pretty nice heads - can't wait to see what the 2nd planting will do!

 

NEW this week - Red Beets and Summer squash!

Summer squash is ripening well, and zucchini is just starting. It sometimes takes the insect pollinators a little while to find the squash and zucchini blossoms, so the first fruits are not always perfect. The bi-color squash may be a blend of yellow and green, and the zucchini can be misshapen.

We did see the bumblebees busily working flowers this morning, so hopefully there will be more good fruits to pick next week!

Check the Recipe Email for Farmer's Favorite Summer squash recipe! 

Red Beets fresh from the garden are truly a treat. The flavor far surpasses anything else. And I think roasting the beets is the best way to eat them - roasting really brings out the sweetness! Check the Recipe email for more details!

 

THE HARVEST

New - Red Beets!

New - Summer squash!

Broccoli 

Cucumbers

Scallions

Garlic scapes

Radishes &/or Turnips

Greens choice: Kale, Bok choy, Napa Cabbage, Arugula

Coming Soon: Carrots, Zucchini, Garlic

Upick:  Sugar snap peas & herbs - check UPick board for amounts! 

Reminder: Please bring containers to transfer your peas into to take home.  And please return boxes if you borrowed them! Thanks!

*Pea picking will be the flag system - read instructions on UPick board and ask for help if needed! You start at a white loop on the stake in the pea patch, and pick in the direction listed on the board. Move the marker to where you finish your box/es. Thanks!

U-PICK GARDEN HOURS: Tuesdays and Fridays, 8 am - 7 pm. Wednesday and Saturday mornings, 9 am - noon. 

*COOPERATIVE SHARES: Eggs, cheese, coffee & biweekly coffee shares this week! Back to back bi-weekly coffee this week - then back to regular schedule next week.

Need to schedule a pickup change or vacation hold? Click here.

Deadline to schedule online is Sunday of the week you need to change, otherwise email Aimee for last-minute changes.

 

More ways below, to find what you need to know:

CSA Pickup/ Upick Hours  - lists hours for all pickup sites, as well as Farm Upick times

CSA Pickup Changes & more - change contact info, check your balance, make a payment, schedule a vacation hold and double pickup, switch to a different pickup day or location for a week, etc. (To permanently change your pickup location, you need to contact Aimee.)

News & Blog - Missed an email? Want to review an old one? You can find all our email posts here in our blog archive.

Recipes - Every week we post new recipes highlighting the vegetables in your share. Most recent additions will be at the top of the page, but we have quite a lot of recipes on this page, and you can search by vegetable to find many more ideas!

 


Your farmers,

John and Aimee Good

The Good Farm

8112 Church Road

Germansville PA 18053

484-262-0675

www.goodfarmcsa.com

facebook.com/goodfarmcsa

instagram.com/goodfarmcsa

Posted 6/12/2019 3:58pm by John and Aimee Good.

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*Scheduled a pickup change? That will be listed here . . . %%scheduled-actions%% Corrections? Please let me know.


We hope you enjoyed your first share. Many items will be in again this week, . . . but also lots of NEW ITEMS, like the silvery kale you see here!

  • Red Russian & White Russian Kale
  • Broccoli
  • Red Radishes
  • Garlic Scapes

In the spring we only grow Red Russian and White Russian Kale. These varieties are very tender and flavorful. Check out the Recipe Email for my favorite Lemon Butter Pasta with Greens, featuring this week's kale!

Red Radishes are so pretty. I like to slice them thinly for salads, or snacking with cheese (using the radish instead of a cracker!) But if radishes are really not your thing, check out the Creamy Radish spread recipe in the next email. . . It may just change your mind!

Garlic scapes are the flowering tops of the garlic plant. They are tender with a milder garlic flavor, and we LOVE them! You can simply chop the entire scape finely and saute just as you would garlic. 1-2 scapes to replace 1 clove garlic for recipes.

Broccoli is just beginning to come in. May be limited amounts this week. More of this tender flower coming soon.

Yep that's right I said flower . . . Did you know that broccoli is actually a flowering head of a brassica plant?!  Kale is the leaf and cabbage is the bud. All were bred from different parts of the brassica oleracea plant.  FUN FACTS ABOUT your VEGGIES!


THE HARVEST

New - Red radishes!

New - Broccoli!

New - White & Red Russian Kale!

New - Garlic scapes!

Salad mix - Check out the pic of harvesting salad mix! We actually grow the lettuce as mini-heads, which are super dense. But we cut and mix it as leaf. So you get the flavor and keeping quality of head lettuce with the convenience and beauty of a salad mix - pretty neat right?

Bok choy

Scallions

Cucumbers

Sugar Snap Peas:

PLEASE NOTE!  Sugar Snap Peas will be outside the boxes! Don't forget to take your box.

And please return boxes for re-use by the farm. THANKS!

UPICK AT THE FARM:

PLEASE NOTE: BECAUSE WE ARE PICKING PEAS FOR DELIVERED BOXES, THERE IS NO EXTRA U-PICK AVAILABLE THIS WEEK. More coming soon! Thanks!

 

COFFEE Samples! We are sending coffee samples from  Bake Oven Coffee Roasters along with your shares!

Please take 1 sample per share!

COFFEE SHARE: Freshly roasted coffee, from our neighbors at Bake Oven Coffee Roasters, right here in Germansville. 12 oz bag ever week or every other week (Biweekly Coffee Share), available as whole bean or drip grind, your choice. Varieties will rotate weekly through seasonally available varieties, including Zambian, Ethiopian, Brazilian, and Guatemalan. Note: coffee reaches peak flavors and aromatics 3-6 days post roast, then does a slow reduction in flavors for about the first 30 days. Coffee for your share will be roasted 3 days prior to distribution, so you are getting the absolute best in flavor from your cup.

Price will be pro-rated when signing up now -  $11/week, $220 for weekly coffee starting this next week, or $110 for Biweekly coffee starting next week. Discount will be added after signup, manually, by farmer. Email with questions.

If you would like to get some of their delicious coffee every week, or every other week, you can now sign up for a coffee share! Click here to Update your Membership.

 

*COOPERATIVE SHARES: Eggs, bread, coffee & biweekly coffee shares this week!

 

We are still seeding and planting many crops for the season. Hoping for a longer sweet corn season - you can never have enough sweet corn, right?  So we are doing 3 successions this year! 2nd succession went out last week.

Hana and Kailey of the farm crew are riding the water wheel transplanter and putting out corn seedlings here.

3rd planting is being seeded in the greenhouse this week.

 

Need to schedule a pickup change or vacation hold? Click here.

Deadline to schedule online is Sunday of the week you need to change, otherwise email Aimee for last-minute changes.

 

More ways below, to find what you need to know:

CSA Pickup/ Upick Hours  - lists hours for all pickup sites, as well as Farm Upick times

CSA Pickup Changes & more - change contact info, check your balance, make a payment, schedule a vacation hold and double pickup, switch to a different pickup day or location for a week, etc. (To permanently change your pickup location, you need to contact Aimee.)

News & Blog - Missed an email? Want to review an old one? You can find all our email posts here in our blog archive.

Recipes - Every week we post new recipes highlighting the vegetables in your share. Most recent additions will be at the top of the page, but we have quite a lot of recipes on this page, and you can search by vegetable to find many more ideas!

 


Your farmers,

John and Aimee Good

The Good Farm

8112 Church Road

Germansville PA 18053

484-262-0675

www.goodfarmcsa.com

facebook.com/goodfarmcsa

instagram.com/goodfarmcsa

Join our mailing list
Blog archives

The Good Farm is a certified organic farm raising vegetables, berries, flowers, and herbs for over 200 "farm share" members. Farmers John and Aimee Good specialize in providing the best quality and most flavorful varieties of the vegetables you love to eat- the staples! We have happy members - over 70% return every year!

 

Our customers say they eat healthier, feel better, save money, become inspired cooks, and even lose weight by joining the farm. Experience the joy of putting a delicious meal on the table by your own two hands. It's easy when the ingredients are this fresh and this good.

 

Support a type of farm that you can believe in; the kind you imagined as a child; where people pick the produce by hand, the soils are thriving, and the fields are full of life.

 

Become a CSA member today, it's the gift to yourself that keeps giving back! 

"Because The Good Farm makes you feel GOOD!"

8112 Church Rd.
Germansville, PA 18053
484-262-0675
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