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Posted 9/6/2016 8:03am by John and Aimee Good.

THE HARVEST

Delicata & Sunshine Squash (Sunshine squash is a sweeter, dryer squash with bright orange flesh. It can be cut in half and baked, then topped with butter and maple syrup or a savory stuffing. The flesh makes a delicious filling for ravioli or is wonderful in squash gnocchi!)

Red & Heirloom tomatoes

Summer Squash and/or zucchini

Sweet peppers

Salad Mix

Arugula and/or Asian Greens

Radishes

Kale

Potatoes

Garlic

Red Onions

CHOICE: cucumbers, eggplant

COMING SOON: sweet potatoes

UPICK at the farm: Green & Dragon Tongue beans, Cut flowers, Hot peppers, cherry/grape/paste tomatoes, Flowers, and Herbs: cilantro,dill & parsley

COOPERATIVE SHARES: Mushrooms - shiitake & pioppino this week. Bread, & fruit shares this week!

 

Sorry for the abbreviated harvest update! More pictures and stories to come soon! We worked a half-day yesterday for the holiday, and there is lots more picking to do, so I am off to the fields! -Aimee

 

 

Your farmers,

John and Aimee Good

Quiet Creek Farm

Posted 8/29/2016 2:08pm by John and Aimee Good.

RECIPES

Here are some great recipe ideas featuring the vegetables in your CSA share this week. You can search our RECIPE PAGE by vegetable to find more. (All posted recipes are archived there.) Enjoy!

Cousin Karen’s Fresh Garden Soup -contributed by CSA member Kristine Moser
 
1 cup chopped celery
1 small onion, chopped
1 carrot, grated
1/2 green pepper, chopped
1/4 cup butter
4 1/2 cups chicken broth, divided
1 quart fresh tomatoes, peeled, seeded and chopped
1/2 tsp curry powder
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 tsp pepper
4 tsp sugar
1/4 cup flour (I use corn starch)
 
Saute celery, onion, carrot and green pepper in butter in large, heavy pan.
Add 4 cups of broth, the tomatoes, curry powder, salt, pepper and sugar. Bring to a boil then reduce heat and simmer for about 20 minutes.
Blend flour with remaining 1/2 cup of broth and stir gradually into the soup. Heat until slightly thickened.

Stove Top Potato and Kale Saute

Ingredients:

2 Tbsp. coconut oil

1/2 onion, chopped

1 clove garlic, minced

1-2 carrots, shredded

1 sweet pepper, diced

4-5 potatoes, diced

1 bunch kale, cut or torn in small pieces

Salt, pepper, favorite herbs

Heat oil in saute pan.  Cook onion and garlic until translucent.  Add carrots and pepper and cook for 2-3 minutes.  Add potatoes, cover pan, and cook for 15-20 minutes.  Once tender, stir in kale and seasonings. 

You can top this with baked potato toppings or season it for a breakfast saute.  Toward the end of cooking time, make wells and fry eggs in the potatoes to make a complete breakfast.

Adapted from http://thediva-dish.com/uncategorized/stove-top-potato-kale-dish/

Beets in Mustard Vinaigrette, shared by CSA member Diane Gosselin.
This recipe is from The Healthy Kitchen – Recipes for a Better Body, Life, and Spirit (Hardcover) by Andrew Weil, M.D and Rosie Daley (Knopf)
 
 
Description

The sharp taste of beets is masked in this recipe by the simple mustardy vinaigrette. Be sure to allow the beets to marinate for a full day in order for the flavors to marry.

Food as Medicine

Beets get their rich color from betacyanin, a compound that also appears to help lower cancer risk. Several studies have indicated that consuming beets is particularly effective against colon cancer.

 
Ingredients

1 pound red beets
1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil
3 tablespoons prepared mustard, preferably whole grain or Dijon
1 medium onion, chopped
Salt to taste
3 tablespoons red wine vinegar

 
Instructions

1. Cut the tops off the beets, leaving 1 inch of stems attached. Place the beets in a pot of cold water to cover, bring to a boil, reduce heat, and boil until the beets can easily be pierced through with a sharp knife, 45-60 minutes depending on their size.

2. Meanwhile, put the mustard in a bowl and whisk in the vinegar. Then whisk in the olive oil in a steady stream until the sauce is smooth and creamy. Add the onions.

3. When the beets are done, drain them, and submerge them in several changes of cold water until they are just cool enough to handle. Cut off the roots and tops, slip the skins off, and slice the warm beets into the mustard sauce. Mix well, cover, and let marinate in the refrigerator for at least 24 hours. Before serving, mix well and add salt if desired.

 

Your farmers,

 

John and Aimee Good

Quiet Creek Farm

Posted 8/29/2016 1:52pm by John and Aimee Good.

THE HARVEST

Red & Heirloom tomatoes

Cucumbers

Summer Squash and/or zucchini

Sweet peppers

Salad Mix

Kale or Swiss Chard

Potatoes

Garlic

Red Onions

CHOICE: Melons, red beets (Sorry to see the last of the melons this week! They had a great run this year - the most melons we have ever picked, and some of the largest. Check out this melon head on David Hopkins - Farm apprentice extraordinaire!)

COMING SOON: delicata squash, sweet potatoes, arugula

UPICK at the farm: Green beans, Cut flowers, Hot peppers, cherry/grape/paste tomatoes, Flowers, and Herbs: cilantro,dill & parsley

COOPERATIVE SHARES: Mushrooms - shiitake this week. Cooler problems last week, so lions mane replaced shiitake. Cheese, bread, & fruit shares this week!

FARM NEWS: We are about to enter a new season on the farm. As the temperatures drop to more pleasant days and cool nights in September, cool-weather crops of the springtime will return again, like lettuce, arugula, broccoli, radishes, as well as new fall crops like winter squash! I love this time of year because the summer crops are still coming in,  and the fall crops are beginning so we have greens again, as well as roots and onions, and squashes on the way - all in all a great season for eating!

The first winter squash to come in is Delicata - my favorite, pictured on the left. Like all squashes, it is best stored at room temperature. They are so pretty that you can wipe them down and leave them in a basket on the counter or windowsill, until ready to use. Early season squashes are best used within 1-3 months, while later squashes, such as Butternut, will keep for 6 months or more.

Delicata has a tender skin, which can be eaten when roasted. To roast squashes, you can cut in half, scoop out seeds, and bake cut side down for about 40 minutes at 350, until tender when pierced with a fork. Turn over, add a pat of butter and drizzle with maple syrup - a dessert vegetable! Or stuff cavity with a mixture of grains and greens, sausage and apples, etc.

You can also slice delicata in rounds, toss with olive oil and salt, and bake on a sheet pan at 400 for 20 minutes. Delicious!

 

Your farmers,

John and Aimee Good

Quiet Creek Farm

Posted 8/21/2016 1:06pm by John and Aimee Good.

RECIPES

Here are some great recipe ideas featuring the vegetables in your CSA share this week. You can search our RECIPE PAGE by vegetable to find more. (All posted recipes are archived there.) Enjoy!

 

FRESH CORN CHOWDER

Adapted from Joy of Cooking

INGREDIENTS

1 small onion, chopped

2 med. celery stalks or 1/2 celeriac, diced (optional)

kernels cut from 4-6 ears of corn, plus cobs

4 1/2 cups milk

2 medium potatoes, scrubbed and diced

1 1/2 tsp. salt

1/2 tsp. ground white or black pepper

1 tbsp. butter

4 slices bacon (optional)

METHOD

If using bacon, place in soup pot and cook, turning, until crisp. Remove bacon strips but leave at least 2 tbsp. of fat. Cook the onions and celery in the fat for about 10 minutes, until softened. If not using bacon, can use bacon fat, butter, ghee, lard, or corn oil to cook vegetables.

Add milk, potatoes, and corn cobs to the soup pot. Push cobs under to submerge. Bring mixture to a boil. Watch carefully to ensure milk does not boil over! Reduce heat to low and simmer, uncovered, for about 10 to 15 minutes, until potatoes are tender. Remove cobs. Add kernels, salt and pepper. Simmer 5 more minutes.

With an immersion blender, you can now puree about half of the soup, if desired, leaving about half un-blended for the texture and color. Turn off heat and add butter. Once butter melts, stir in and serve soup.

Makes about 6 cups.

Easy Melon Sorbet

1) To freeze melon chunks: Cut cantaloupe in half and scoop out seeds. Cut into wedges and remove peels. Then cut wedges into chunks and place on cookie tray in freezer.

2) To make sorbet: Remove melon chunks from freezer and place in food processor. Let set for about a half hour to thaw slightly. (I usually put them in before dinner and then make the sorbet just after dinner.) Add a splash of lemon juice and about ¼ cup honey or agave syrup. Add about 1/4 c. hot water and blend until smooth. Add more water if necessary to desired consistency, and add more sweetener to taste. Serve immediately. 

Watermelon Aqua Fresca

1 small watermelon (approx 3-4 lbs)

1 c. water or seltzer

juice from ½ lime (to 1 lime)

sugar or Agave syrup to taste

1 lime sliced into thin rounds

fresh mint leaves

1) Cut watermelon into chunks, approx 2 inches, discard rind

2) Pulse watermelon in food processor in very short bursts several times (keeping seeds intact)

3) You may need to do this several times in order to get through the entire melon

4) Strain juice into a large pitcher (to remove seeds), you should have 2 ½ -  3 cups juice

5) Mix with water or seltzer and lime juice, to taste

6) Add sugar, simple syrup or Agave syrup* to taste

7) Serve over ice with lime rounds & mint leaves

Serves 3-4

*Agave syrup is a low glycemic sweetener with a very mild flavor. It can be found at health food stores. 

*Variation: You can also turn this into an adult drink by using vodka in place of water.



Your farmers,

 

John and Aimee Good

Quiet Creek Farm

Posted 8/21/2016 1:06pm by John and Aimee Good.

RECIPES

Here are some great recipe ideas featuring the vegetables in your CSA share this week. You can search our RECIPE PAGE by vegetable to find more. (All posted recipes are archived there.) Enjoy!

 

FRESH CORN CHOWDER

Adapted from Joy of Cooking

INGREDIENTS

1 small onion, chopped

2 med. celery stalks or 1/2 celeriac, diced (optional)

kernels cut from 4-6 ears of corn, plus cobs

4 1/2 cups milk

2 medium potatoes, scrubbed and diced

1 1/2 tsp. salt

1/2 tsp. ground white or black pepper

1 tbsp. butter

4 slices bacon (optional)

METHOD

If using bacon, place in soup pot and cook, turning, until crisp. Remove bacon strips but leave at least 2 tbsp. of fat. Cook the onions and celery in the fat for about 10 minutes, until softened. If not using bacon, can use bacon fat, butter, ghee, lard, or corn oil to cook vegetables.

Add milk, potatoes, and corn cobs to the soup pot. Push cobs under to submerge. Bring mixture to a boil. Watch carefully to ensure milk does not boil over! Reduce heat to low and simmer, uncovered, for about 10 to 15 minutes, until potatoes are tender. Remove cobs. Add kernels, salt and pepper. Simmer 5 more minutes.

With an immersion blender, you can now puree about half of the soup, if desired, leaving about half un-blended for the texture and color. Turn off heat and add butter. Once butter melts, stir in and serve soup.

Makes about 6 cups.

Easy Melon Sorbet

1) To freeze melon chunks: Cut cantaloupe in half and scoop out seeds. Cut into wedges and remove peels. Then cut wedges into chunks and place on cookie tray in freezer.

2) To make sorbet: Remove melon chunks from freezer and place in food processor. Let set for about a half hour to thaw slightly. (I usually put them in before dinner and then make the sorbet just after dinner.) Add a splash of lemon juice and about ¼ cup honey or agave syrup. Add about 1/4 c. hot water and blend until smooth. Add more water if necessary to desired consistency, and add more sweetener to taste. Serve immediately. 

Watermelon Aqua Fresca

1 small watermelon (approx 3-4 lbs)

1 c. water or seltzer

juice from ½ lime (to 1 lime)

sugar or Agave syrup to taste

1 lime sliced into thin rounds

fresh mint leaves

1) Cut watermelon into chunks, approx 2 inches, discard rind

2) Pulse watermelon in food processor in very short bursts several times (keeping seeds intact)

3) You may need to do this several times in order to get through the entire melon

4) Strain juice into a large pitcher (to remove seeds), you should have 2 ½ -  3 cups juice

5) Mix with water or seltzer and lime juice, to taste

6) Add sugar, simple syrup or Agave syrup* to taste

7) Serve over ice with lime rounds & mint leaves

Serves 3-4

*Agave syrup is a low glycemic sweetener with a very mild flavor. It can be found at health food stores. 

*Variation: You can also turn this into an adult drink by using vodka in place of water.



Your farmers,

 

John and Aimee Good

Quiet Creek Farm

Posted 8/12/2016 8:23am by John and Aimee Good.


Edamame is ready in the Upick garden this week!  These delicious fresh soybeans are a simple and yummy treat.

Boil water with a pinch of salt

 Add beans

 Boil beans 2 minutes. Drain. Sprinkle with salt. Pop beans out of pods directly into your mouth.

Enjoy this fun and tasty snack!

 

Your farmers,

 

John and Aimee Good

Quiet Creek Farm

Posted 8/8/2016 9:51am by John and Aimee Good.

THE HARVEST

(Heirloom and yellow/orange tomatoes are truly tasty, colorful, and fun. Varieties: Clockwise from the top - Margold, Pink Berkeley Tie-dye, Ferline, Aunt Ginny's Purple, Arkansas Traveler, Beorange. The "cat-facing" that you see on the Aunt Ginny's Purple tomato in the center of the basket is characteristic of heirloom tomatoes. It happens sometimes. The oddities are worth it, the flavor can't be beat!)

Potatoes

Red/yellow Watermelon &/or Muskmelons

Cucumbers

Summer Squash and/or zucchini

Green peppers &/or sweet peppers

Garlic

Sweet onions

Carrots

CHOICE: Swiss chard, Purple scallions, red beets, eggplant/Asian eggplant

COMING SOON: more sweet corn, sweet peppers, edamame

UPICK at the farm: Green/yellow beans, Cut flowers, Hot peppers, cherry/grape/paste tomatoes, Herbs: basil, cilantro,dill & parsley,

FARM NEWS

Japanese beetles are a common farm pest. They can arrive in a horde and eat a multitude of crops. The farm was hit with an infestation of Japanese beetles several weeks ago. You can see the damages in the crops now. The cucumbers have scarring on the skins, the green and yellow beans have some pock marks, some of the corn ears from lasts week's harvest were short of kernels. Japanese beetles were feeding on the pollen on the corn silks, and, AMAZING FACT! - each silk must be pollinated to make a kernel of corn. So if a silk is damaged, there will not be a kernel at the end of it.

The farm crew did utilize organic products and techniques to encourage them to leave. Luckily, the majority of the Japanese beetles have moved on, and the eggplant plants and edamame plants, which they were thoroughly enjoying munching on, have recovered. For now, you can snap off any bad ends of corn ears, peel scarred skin on cucumbers, and break off any bad spots on the beans.

Overall, the farm has been blessed with little disease and pest pressure thus far this summer, and we are grateful. The hot and dry weather which comprised most of the summer is not conducive to the spread of  many diseases, which generally travel by storms, and propagate in humid weather.

We are looking forward to more delicious summer crops for the next few weeks. The next planting of sweet corn is larger and looks even better than the first. More melons should be coming in, including yellow watermelons! The field tomatoes are just starting to ripen in numbers. The sweet peppers' ripening season is about to begin, usually mid-August through to October, with September being the peak month. We have been very busy planting the fall greens, broccoli, roots, and cabbages. Those crops will be returning in the coming months. Enjoy the harvest!

 

Your farmers,

 

John and Aimee Good

Quiet Creek Farm

Posted 8/8/2016 9:24am by John and Aimee Good.

RECIPES below contributed by CSA member Linda Fix. Thanks for sharing these! Enjoy!

 

Mediterranean Pasta (my take on it)  A good recipe for the food items coming now and I think it is a lighter version for the summer.

Cook 12 to 16 oz. of spaghetti or similar type noodles or really anything you have on hand, drain and drizzle with olive oil – set aside or cook last.

Cut up a large bowl of mixed yellow and zucchini squashes about ¼ inch thick (larger slices halved).  Add salt to draw out moisture and coat with olive oil.  Grill until browned and almost soft (a little firm) with a fajita seasoning type mix in a grilling basket or similar.  Substitute eggplant if squash is not your thing since here, but have to say squashes are delish when grilled also.

Thaw a package of Ledemete sausage mix (I like the maple jalapeno) and squeeze from the skin into the almost cooked grilled squash into chunky pieces.

Thinly slice a couple or few of the fresh garlic cloves or what suits your taste and toss in with the sausage and squashes. 

Grill until all is done and meat is no longer pink.

As they finish grilling, take a good bunch of the basil tops and cut coarsely and put into a food processor or similar.  Chop into small pieces and add a little olive oil to make a little wet.  Take a ¼ pound of so of sliced almonds (pine nuts work also) and add some more olive oil to get to the consistency of moist crumbs not as runny as pesto.

Put it all together – take a good heaping of pasta, add the squash and sausage mix next to cover, sprinkle a generous tablespoon of the basil nut crumbs on top.  Either cut up fresh tomato or drop 4 or 5 good spoonful’s of chunky tomato/spaghetti sauce on top and grate mozzarella cheese on the very top.  Melt the cheese or add  fresh parmesan cheese to taste. 

Enjoy with some thick artisan flat bread or similar and have a side salad of cucumbers or other fresh veggies in a vinegar base (firm cooked green beans, fresh tomato and thinly sliced onion works well)  

 

Mexican Medley (my alternative version for using the ‘Three Sisters’ of Corn, Squash and Beans and is too hot for soups or stews)

1. Cut up onions, and squash (as above) and green pepper.  Add some hot peppers if you like heat beyond the rest of the ingredients.

2. Add seasonings like garlic (I like fresh if you have it), loads of cumin, oregano and hot chili pepper flakes to taste.  A fajita type seasoning works well too along with your own choices.

3. Sauté or grill in a basket until getting soft and add in Chorizo sausage until no longer pink or a mild type sausage if you prefer. 

4. When almost tender, cut off some corn on the cob and add to mix and cook to just tender (or cooked previously). 

5. Dump in a jar of salsa, add any type of cooked beans (I like pinto, black beans and dark red kidney beans) and optionally brown rice and/or quinoa cooked until heated.  Adjust the amount of salsa to have enough liquid if you add grains.

6. Top with spicy cheese (Hillacres was great) or if you prefer something mild to your taste like cheddar or fresh parmesan – melt as desired

7. Top with a quite liberal amount of fresh cilantro

8. Enjoy with a good jalapeno cornbread or skip the jalapeno as you like. 

 

Summer salad – my grandkids love this (if not fond of basil, pull their share out first or add lightly to top of theirs before adding more)

1. Cut up some fresh tomatoes into medium to larger chunks and place in bowl

2. Cut up some mozzarella cheese into chunks or use balls and add to tomatoes

3. Optionally cut in some of the ripe peaches you have on hand and/or add a can of black olives

4. Mix lightly with olive oil and lemon juice to taste – does not take much to make it juicy enough with the fruit

5. Mix in a liberal amount of fresh basil or top to taste. 



Your farmers,

 

John and Aimee Good

Quiet Creek Farm

Posted 8/1/2016 1:04pm by John and Aimee Good.

THE HARVEST

Sweet Corn

Watermelon &/or Muskmelons

Tomatoes

Cucumbers

Summer Squash and/or zucchini

Green peppers

Garlic

Sweet onions

Carrots

Swiss chard OR red beets OR eggplant/Asian eggplant

COMING SOON: sweet peppers, edamame, yellow watermelon, red &/or white potatoes

UPICK at the farm: Green beans, Basil & parsley, Cut flowers, Hot wax peppers, cherry tomatoes

FARM NEWS

We certainly got our wish for rain, and them some! The soils should be good and saturated after this weekend. We are glad that the rains were gentle and slow. The violent storms of the preceding weeks washed away the fall carrot plantings, two weeks in a row! Fingers crossed for the third planting. If this one doesn't take, we will be out of time! Carrots are very slow growers. The fall carrots seeded in July will be harvested in October. 

We hope you are enjoying the fruits of summer. Melon and sweet corn season is one of our favorite times of the year! More fruiting crops on the way - more tomatoes, sweet peppers, more corn, yellow watermelons, muskmelons - enjoy the sweetness!

COOPERATIVE SHARES: Fruit shares begin this week! Please be sure to check off your name before taking your fruit. One bag per share. Special orders will be bagged and labeled separately!

FINAL BALANCES:All final balances were due July 30th. Any overdue balances must be paid this week in order to continue picking up shares. Any questions, please contact Aimee.

 

Your farmers,

 

John and Aimee Good

Quiet Creek Farm

Posted 8/1/2016 12:50pm by John and Aimee Good.

RECIPES

Here are some great recipe ideas featuring the vegetables in your CSA share this week. Thanks to CSA members for the wonderful contributions!

You can search our RECIPE PAGE by vegetable to find more. (All posted recipes are archived there.) Enjoy!

 

Jeff's Red Gazpacho

 

3 lb. tomatoes

1/4 cup cold water

2 cloves garlic

4 tbl. olive oil

3 tbl red wine vinegar

3 tbl. sherry vinegar

2 tsp worchestershire sauce

1/2 tps hot sauce

1 1/2 tsp salt

1/2 tsp pepper

1. skin and seed tomatoes putting seed and juice through strainer

2. put tomatoes and all ingredients EXCEPT water in blender

3. add reserved tomato juice and cold water to make 1 cup into blender

4. pulse blender 10 times , more or less depending on the consistency desired.

5. chill for several hours

6. serve with diced vegetables for garnish, chopped tomatoes, onion, peppers, cucumber and croutons.

*Thanks to CSA member Jeff Kahn for this tasty treat!

Jeff's Yellow Gazpacho

 

3 lb yellow tomatoes

1/2 tsp pepper

2 cloves garlic

1/4 cup cold water

3 tbl good quality peanut oil

1 tbl sesame oil 3

tbl white wine vinegar

3 tbl rice vinegar either sweetened or regular

1 1/2 tsp white worchestershire sauce

1/2 tsp sriracha or other hot sauce

1 1/2 tsp salt

1. skin and seed tomatoes, putting seed and juice through a strainer

2. put tomatoes and all ingredients EXCEPT water in blender

3. add reserved tomato juice and enough cold water to make 1 cup in blender

4. pulse blender 10 times to desired consistence

5. chill for several hours

6. serve with diced vegetables for garnish, chopped tomato, onion, pepper, cucumber and croutons

7. this soup can be ladled side by side in a bowl with Red Gazpacho for a beautiful presentation

*Thanks to CSA member Jeff Kahn for this delicious contribution!


Your farmers,

 

John and Aimee Good

Quiet Creek Farm

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The Good Farm is a certified organic farm raising vegetables, berries, flowers, and herbs for a CSA (Community Supported Agriculture) and farmer's market. Farmers John and Aimee Good specialize in providing the best quality and most flavorful varieties of the vegetables you love to eat- the staples! We have happy members - over 70% return every year!

 

Many customers say they eat healthier, feel better, learn to cook new things, save money, and even lose weight by joining the farm. We are all connected to farming, as we are all eaters. Experience seasonal eating. Support a type of farm that you can believe in; the kind you imagined as a child; where people pick the produce by hand, the soils are thriving, and the fields are full of life. Become a CSA member or visit The Good Farm at the Trexlertown Farmer's Market. Because "it's all GOOD!"

 

"Eating is an agricultural act" - Wendell Berry

8112 Church Rd.
Germansville, PA 18053
484-262-0675
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