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Posted 12/6/2018 2:28pm by John and Aimee Good.



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We all have a personal doctor, who knows us and takes care of us. Many of us have an accountant and a lawyer. We hire others to do important jobs for us, that we cannot do ourselves.

So why not a personal farmer? What is more important than the food you put into your body every day?

You shake hands with your farmer every time you prepare a meal using your farm share.

And that’s a great thing! For your health, and your peace of mind.

At The Good Farm, we are your personal farmers.

We are growing directly for you, the highest quality certified organic produce.

And you can tell the difference, because you can taste it!

Many CSA members tell me -

  • I feel better and have more energy.
  • I have lost weight.
  • I am eating more vegetables and fruits than ever before.
  • I love the recipes and am cooking new things.
  • I appreciate the storage tips and am keeping my produce much longer.
  • I cannot go back to the grocery store, your produce has made me a food snob!

As your personal farmers, we want to make sure that you are getting the most out of each and every farm share.

Very few other CSA farms do this like we do:

  • Storage tips for every season - spring, summer & fall.
  • Weekly recipes using the farm share - that are simple, but good.
  • Most recipes are tested or created in farmer Aimee’s kitchen!

We all know that the old adage is true - food is the first medicine.

And if you don’t know where your food is coming from, that can pose a health risk these days!

When you know your farmer, you can trust your food. Pretty simple.  

P.S. Renew your membership here at the early bird rate and get $15 off. Now through December 15th.

Your farmers,

John and Aimee Good

The Good Farm

8112 Church Road

Germansville PA 18053

484-262-0675

www.goodfarmcsa.com

facebook.com/goodfarmcsa

instagram.com/goodfarmcsa

Posted 12/3/2018 9:25am by John and Aimee Good.

First of all, thanks to many of you who already renewed your farm share! We REALLY appreciate it!

I am going to review the payment plans below, because everyone may benefit from this information.

And if you have not yet jumped on the Early Bird Train, here are the details:

Buy now and SAVE - Small share price now-$610! After Dec. 15th pay $625.

Regular share price now is $825. After Dec. 15th pay $840.

Click HERE to SIGN UP NOW!

We are farmers, we completely understand having a tight budget! Especially around the holiday season. So we have payment plans to make it easy for you to spread out your farm share payments over several months.

A review of the payment plan: 20% deposit is all that is required to sign up! For a small share right now, that is just $122 and for a regular share, $165. No further payments until March!

From March through June you will receive an email reminder about your payment, which is due at the end of the month. The payments will be the same amount as your initial deposit, for a total of 4 monthly payments. Simple!

Flexible - You can pay in full at signup if you prefer. You can always pay your balance ahead of time if you wish, or make a double payment one month and then skip the next month. You can login to your member account with your email address to check your balance or make a payment at any time.

Extra Shares - If you decide to add on any of our extra shares, your payments will be slightly more than that listed above. But guess what? You don’t have to add them right away! You can add on any of the extra shares at any point prior to the start of the season, as long as they are still available.  (Fruit and egg shares have limited quantities.)

Payment types - We take check payments (sent via mail or through your own online banking) or credit card payments via Paypal, with a slight surcharge to cover fees. You can switch payment methods at any point in the season by sending us an email.

(Unfortunately the Dwolla platform, which offered free online bank transfers has closed down. We will continue to seek out another low-cost option for online transactions.)

 

Well, I think I covered everything about payments here, but please let me know if you have any questions, about payment plans or otherwise!

P.S. Looking for a share partner to split pickups every other week? Please let me know! I am creating a list to match members for biweekly pickup.

 

Your farmers,

John and Aimee Good

The Good Farm

8112 Church Road

Germansville PA 18053

484-262-0675

www.goodfarmcsa.com

facebook.com/goodfarmcsa

instagram.com/goodfarmcsa

Posted 11/27/2018 10:55am by John and Aimee Good.

We hope you enjoyed a lovely Thanksgiving holiday, with good food, family and friends! 

I love Thanksgiving -  all of my favorite things - lots of delicious food, shared with family and friends!

In the spirit of giving thanks, which I want to hold onto for a little while longer, although all the world is trying to push me right into the next holiday, here is a note from your farmers. . .

Grateful farmers. We are grateful for the opportunity to do this work, to feed our community with REAL food fresh from the farm, and for your support to make it happen.

Proud farmers - Every job that gets accomplished on the farm makes us proud, big or little. Building the high tunnel, a 30' by 96' structure, was a great feat.

Back in October, completing the job of spreading straw mulch by hand over all the garlic and strawberry beds had us pretty excited, as you can see in this picture! 

Humble - Humility comes hand in hand with farming. We have witnessed first-hand how acts of nature can take apart in minutes; what it took weeks or even months to construct, like a barn roof! Every season we see that the results of our toil are subject to the whims of nature. This helps to keep us from getting "too big for our britches!"

Happy - We are happy that you are committed to eating REAL food, that you have chosen us to be your personal farmers, that you have shared this journey with us. For some of you, 2018 was your first experience, and for many, we have been doing this together for many years now.

 

We want to thank you for your continued support, and to offer you the opportunity to share the harvest again in 2019!

The farm is a living entity, that thrives with the support of members. The best part is that it gives back all season long with farm shares of delicious produce!

 

Coming December 1st, we will be opening up membership to 2018 members only, with a special EARLY BIRD discount!

You won't want to miss this special offer, which will only last for 2 weeks!

More information on this special renewal period for current members to come shortly. . . Keep an eye on your inbox!

 

Your farmers,

John and Aimee Good

The Good Farm

8112 Church Road

Germansville PA 18053

484-262-0675

www.goodfarmcsa.com

facebook.com/goodfarmcsa

instagram.com/goodfarmcsa

Posted 11/15/2018 11:08am by John and Aimee Good.

Wow - we have had a busy 2 weeks! But the new high tunnel is nearly completed. We were able to build this new tunnel through a grant program with the USDA NRCS. We are so excited!

This was a huge project, which we could not have done without the help of our returning farm apprentice David Darling, our local farmer friends Anton Shannon, Brandon Haines, and Dan Hunter; and my wonderful sister and parents; April Kocis, David & Mary Kocis, respectively. Thanks everyone! 

We plan to start the grafted tomatoes in this new tunnel, as it is slightly larger, and to use the older tunnel for other season extension, such as early European style cucumbers and fall greens.

Here you can see the early stages of construction (pic left), the full house (pic right), and finally below, the tunnel at sunset. Thanks to our neighbor and CSA member Scott Wagner for the awesome sunset pic!

 

 

Your farmers,

John and Aimee Good

The Good Farm

8112 Church Road

Germansville PA 18053

484-262-0675

www.goodfarmcsa.com

facebook.com/goodfarmcsa

instagram.com/goodfarmcsa

Posted 10/16/2018 8:24am by John and Aimee Good.

All the recipes listed below, and many more, are on our website, on our Recipe Page. You can search by vegetable, using the search box on the right!

We hope you enjoy using these recipes and finding your own new recipes featuring the vegetables in your share. Please feel free to share any recipes that you love with us!

MANY RECIPES FOR HAKUREI TURNIPS CAN BE FOUND ON OUR RECIPE PAGE! Just type TURNIP into the search box on the right!

Sesame-Ginger Turnip Rice Bowls

Prep Time: 15 minutes    Cook Time: 25 minutes    Serves: 4

For the stir fry:

  • 2 Tablespoon grapeseed oil
  • 1 bunch baby turnips, with greens (about 1 lb total) turnips cut into 1/4 inch chunks and greens lightly chopped
  • 1 large bunch of scallions, diced (white and light green parts only)
  • 1/4 teaspoon minced ginger
  • 1 cup uncooked brown rice
  • A few handfuls of fresh cilantro, chopped

For the Sauce:

  • 1 large clove of garlic, minced
  • 3 Tablespoons low sodium tamari
  • 2 Tablespoons water
  • 1-2 Tablespoon grated fresh ginger
  • 1 Tablespoon honey
  • 1 Tablespoon rice wine vinegar
  • 2 teaspoons sesame oil
  • 1/4 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes

Preparation

 
  1. Combine all the ingredients for the sauce in a mason jar and shake until well combined. Taste test and  adjust seasonings if necessary. Set aside.
  2. Cook brown rice according to specific directions.
  3. In a large skillet over medium-high heat add grapeseed oil. Stir in ginger and scallions. Saute' until fragrent. About 3 minutes. Add turnips and cook until turnips begin to soften and brown. About 8-12 minutes. Stir occasionally. Add a few drops of water if turnips are drying out. Once turnips are tender throw in turnip greens and cook until greens begin to wilt. About 5 minutes. Remove from heat.
  4. Combine cooked turnips with rice, minced cilantro and sauce. Enjoy!

Notes

* Use this recipe as a guide. * Adjust measurements and ingredients as necessary. *Always taste test as you go.

from - www.dishingupdirt.com

 

Creamy Autumn Fettucini

I love creating recipes that are flexible and can use many of the veggies in the share this week. My family loved this one. Although  there are several steps, it is actually pretty easy and quick, and super yummy!

Sorry I forgot to take a picture before we devoured it! - Aimee

12 oz. wide ribbon noodles, such as fettucini (rice noodles or wheat)

1 1/2 cups whole milk

4 tbsp. butter

2 tbsp. flour or gluten-free alternative

grated cheese - your choice - Asiago, aged cheddar, etc.

4-8 leaves kale, de-ribbed and sliced into thin ribbons.

1 leek or 1 medium onion

1-2 sweet pepper, thinly sliced

julienned carrot or cubed winter squash

sea salt and ground black pepper

fresh herbs - such as parsley and/or basil

Cook pasta according to directions.

Make cream sauce - in a small, heavy-bottomed pot, melt 2 tbsp. butter. Add 2 tbsp. flour or alternative and stir. Add milk and bring to almost a boil, whisking all the while. Reduce heat to low and continue to whisk until sauce thickens. Crumble a bit of grated cheese into sauce until it melts (about 1/4 - 1/3 cup), to taste. Remove from heat and set aside.

In a large deep-bottomed sauce pan, melt 2 tbsp. butter over medium-low heat. Add thinly sliced leek or onion. Saute until tender, about 5-10 minutes. Add all the rest of the veggies except the kale. Saute for another 5-10 minutes, until veggies are just tender. (Can add a bit of the pasta cooking water to this pan and cover with a lid to steam the veggies and speed up the process.)

Add kale, fresh herbs, and cook for a few minutes, until kale is wilted and bright green. Add cream sauce to pan. Add sea salt and pepper to taste.

Add noodles to pan and stir well to combine and coat noodles. Serve at once.

 

Spicy Kale and Coconut Fried Rice

  • 2 tablespoons coconut oil or quality high-heat oil such as avocado oil, divided
  • 2 eggs, whisked together with a dash of salt
  • 2 big cloves garlic, pressed or minced
  • ¾ cup chopped green onions (about 1 bunch)
  • Optional: 1 cup chopped vegetables, like bell pepper, carrot or Brussels sprouts
  • 1 medium bunch kale (preferably Lacinato but curly green is good, too), ribs removed and leaves chopped
  • ¼ teaspoon fine sea salt
  • ¾ cup large, unsweetened coconut flakes* (not shredded coconut)
  • 2 cups cooked and chilled brown rice**
  • 2 teaspoons reduced-sodium tamari or soy sauce
  • 2 teaspoons chili garlic sauce or sriracha
  • 1 lime, halved
  • Handful fresh cilantro, for garnish
  1. Heat a large (12-inch or wider) wok, cast iron skillet or non-stick frying pan over medium-high heat. Once the pan is hot enough that a drop of water sizzles on contact, add 1 teaspoon oil and swirl the pan to coat the bottom. Pour in the eggs and cook, stirring frequently, until the eggs are scrambled and lightly set. Transfer the eggs to your empty bowl. Wipe out the pan if necessary with a paper towel (be careful, it’s hot!).
  2. Add 1 tablespoon oil to the pan and add the garlic, green onions and optional additional vegetables. Cook until fragrant or until the vegetables are tender, stirring frequently, for 30 seconds or longer. Add the kale and salt. Continue to cook until the kale is wilted and tender, stirring frequently, about 1 to 2 minutes. Transfer the contents of the pan to your bowl of eggs.
  3. Add the remaining 2 teaspoons oil to the pan. Pour in the coconut flakes and cook, stirring frequently, until the flakes are lightly golden, about 30 seconds. Add the rice to the pan and cook, stirring occasionally, until the rice is hot, about 3 minutes.
  4. Pour the contents of the bowl back into the pan, breaking up the scrambled egg with your spatula or spoon. Once warmed, remove the pan from the heat.
  5. Add the tamari, chili garlic sauce and juice of ½ lime. Stir to combine. Taste, and if it’s not fantastic yet, add another teaspoon of tamari or a pinch of salt, as needed.
  6. Slice the remaining ½ lime into wedges, then divide the fried rice into individual bowls. Garnish with wedges of lime and a sprinkling of torn cilantro leaves, with jars of tamari, chili garlic sauce and/or red pepper flakes on the side, for those who might want more.

 

Your farmers,

John and Aimee Good

The Good Farm

8112 Church Road

Germansville PA 18053

484-262-0675

www.goodfarmcsa.com

facebook.com/goodfarmcsa

instagram.com/goodfarmcsa  

Posted 10/16/2018 7:57am by John and Aimee Good.

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Your pickup is %%pickup-time%%, %%pickup-location%%.

If you have scheduled any pickup changes, they are listed here - %%scheduled-actions%%.      Please let me know if these are not correct! Thanks!

Picking and washing hakurei turnips- These are not your mother's turnips!

 

Hakurei turnips are one of our favorite fall roots! This specialty Japanese variety of turnip is extremely versatile in the kitchen, and delicious! Hakurei are very different from the more commonly known purple-top turnips. They have a much more mild flavor and delicate texture. They can be enjoyed raw or cooked, and the greens are excellent for cooking as well. The turnips become sweeter with cooking, and especially so when roasted. I like to think of them as a juicier, less starchy potato.

Raw - slice thinly for salads or snacking. Grate coarsely for salad or slaw.

Cooked - slice thinly and saute with the greens. Cut into chunks to boil and mash as potatoes, or with potatoes.  Toss with olive oil and salt and roast in the oven at 400 degrees for about 15 minutes, until slightly browned and tender.

Cooking the greens - Clean well and lay in a stack on a cutting board. Slice across entire stack, cutting leaves into thin ribbons. (This method also works well for kale, after you de-rib it.)

I like to cook a few pieces of bacon in a cast-iron pan. Remove the bacon after it crisps, and add a sliced onion, saute for a few minutes, and then add the greens. Cook just until tender and bright green. Season with a splash of cider vinegar and sea salt or soy sauce. 

You can also use olive oil and garlic as seasoning instead of the bacon, and a drizzle of toasted sesame oil at the end of cooking adds a nice touch too.

 

Cooking tips for bok choy - This tender Asian green is wonderful for stir-fry. We also love to saute it with garlic and ginger and a touch of toasted sesame oil. If toasted sesame oil is not something in your pantry, you may want to try it out! The nutty flavor is great with greens, and a little goes a long way!

Bok choy is one of our favorite cooking greens. I love the contrast of the tender, juicy stems with the dark greens.

To cook - separate the leaves and thoroughly wash the stems to remove and dirt, especially at the base of the head. You can cook entire leaves, if they are fairly small, which is pretty and fun to eat, or you can chop the stems separately from the leaves, which works best with the larger heads.

Warm your oil in the pan, add garlic and ginger and swirl for a minute or two, then add the bok choy stems and stir gently for a few minutes, just until they begin to soften. Add the greens and cook just a few minutes longer, until they are bright green and tender. Add a splash of soy sauce or a pinch of sea salt. Add a bit of toasted sesame oil and/or sriracha or other hot sauce if desired. Taste and adjust seasonings.

 

THE HARVEST

New- Hakurei turnip bunches!

New - Bok choy!

Salad Mix

Kale-  Fall kale mix of lacinato, white russian, olympic red, and curly green winterbor kale

Colored & green peppers

Garlic

Onions

Fall staple choice - sweet potatoes and/or potatoes, or butternut squash

Choice table:  eggplant, Asian eggplant, scallions, red beets

Coming Soon: cabbage, Napa cabbage, celeriac, more taters, more butternut

 

UPICK at the Farm: Sad to say, the Upick season is winding down. Still some nice herbs and hot peppers, and actually some flowers too!

OPEN HOURS: Tuesdays and Fridays, 8 am - 7 pm. Wednesday and Saturday mornings, 9 am - noon.

Flowers & Herbs 

Hot peppers - up to 1 quart total: cayenne, poblano, hot wax & jalapeno

Harvest list is subject to change weekly. This is our best estimation of the week's shares. Thanks for understanding!

 

IMPORTANT DATES BELOW!

LAST CSA PICKUP WEEK - OCTOBER 29TH - NOVEMBER 2ND

WILD FOR SALMON STOCK-UP SALE - FRIDAY OCT. 26TH & TUESDAY OCT. 30TH

GOOD FARM STOCK-UP SALE - OCT. 30 & NOV. 2ND - more info coming soon!

 

 *EXTRA SHARES: Eggs, bread, coffee & fruit

Fruit: Bartlett pears- excellent rich flavor, best when fully ripe!

Jonagold apples - large, sweet & mildly tart (cross of Golden Delicious & Jonathon) - great for eating and baking.

Empire - small, red, sweet/tart apple. Wonderful for baking and sauce, and good for fresh eating as well. 

Crimson crisp - small to medium, beautiful crimson skin, very crisp and sweet with a hint of tart, excellent eating. Fine for baking also.

*Fruit storage tips: Pears will take a while on the counter, almost a week, to ripen fully, with a nice soft texture and sweetness. Apples should be stored in the fridge, for best flavor and crispness. Apples can be eaten right away, but will keep for a few weeks also.

 

CSA Extras :  Good Farm pasta sauce and Good Farm salsa, mild, as well as Old-fashioned Ketchup!    Still have Good Farm tote bags too! Order here, or pick up in the barn at on-farm pickup.

Need to schedule a pickup change or vacation hold? Click here.

 

More ways below, to find what you need to know:

CSA Pickup/ Upick Hours  - lists hours for all pickup sites, as well as Farm Upick times

CSA Pickup Changes - you can login to your member account with your email address to change contact info, check your balance, make a payment, schedule a vacation hold and double pickup, switch to a different pickup day or location for a week, etc. (To permanently change your pickup location, you need to contact Aimee.)

News & Blog - Missed an email? Want to review an old one? You can find all our email posts here in our blog archive.

Recipes - Every week we post new recipes highlighting the vegetables in your share. Most recent additions will be at the top of the page, but we have quite a lot of recipes on this page, and you can search by vegetable to find many more ideas!



Your farmers,

John and Aimee Good

The Good Farm

8112 Church Road

Germansville PA 18053

484-262-0675

www.goodfarmcsa.com

facebook.com/goodfarmcsa

instagram.com/goodfarmcsa

Posted 10/9/2018 2:22pm by John and Aimee Good.

All the recipes listed below, and many more, are on our website, on our Recipe Page. You can search by vegetable, using the search box on the right!

We hope you enjoy using these recipes and finding your own new recipes featuring the vegetables in your share. Please feel free to share any recipes that you love with us!

 

 WHITE BEAN & KALE SOUP

  • 1 bunch kale, de-stemmed and chopped
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 1-2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1-2 carrots, diced finely
  • 1-2 peppers, chopped small
  • 2 cans cannellini beans, (14.5 ounces each), drained and rinsed
  • 2 cups water
  • 2 cups chicken or vegetable broth
  • Salt and pepper
  • parsley
  • Grated Parmesan cheese, (optional)
  • Cooked spicy sausage, such as chorizo or hot Italian (optional)

    In a medium saucepan, heat 2 tablespoon oil over medium-high heat. Add onion, and cook until softened, about 5 minutes. Add garlic and cook another minute or two.

    Add about half of the beans, and lightly mash with a fork. Add water and stock, and the rest of the vegetables. Bring to a boil, and then reduce heat to simmer. Simmer for about 10 minutes, until carrots & pepper are partially tender. Stir in kale, parsley, remaining beans, 2 teaspoon salt, and 1/2 teaspoon pepper. Add cooked sausage here if using. Partially cover, reduce heat, and simmer until kale is tender, about 5-10 minutes.

    Ladle soup into bowls. Sprinkle with Parmesan, if desired. Serve with crusty bread.

    Adapted from www.marthastewart.com


Kale Chips

Ingredients

  • 1 bunch kale
  • olive oil in Spritzer, or in small bowl
  • Seasoning desired - sea salt, parmesan cheese, chili powder, etc.

Directions

  1. Preheat an oven to 400 degrees F. Use convection if you have it.
  2. Oil a baking tray.
  3. With a knife or kitchen shears carefully remove the leaves from the thick stems, but try to keep leaves whole. 
  4. Lay kale leaves on the oiled tray. Spray or brush top sides of leaves with olive oil.
  5. Sprinkle with seasoning of your choice.
  6. Bake until the leaves just begin to get dry & crispy, edges brown but are not burnt.
  7. This can take anywhere from 5-10 minutes, but they must be watched closely! They will go from perfect to burnt very quickly! 

Kale and Caramelized Onion Pizza

Use your favorite pizza crust recipe like we did, or make it a quick meal using a pre-made dough that can be found in the grocery store deli section!

4-5 Baby Bella, Shiitake, or Button mushrooms sliced

10-15 Sage leaves, can be lightly browned in butter

2 cups of baby kale or full size kale chopped

1 cup caramelized onion

2 cups of shredded fresh mozarella

1/2 cup shredded sharp cheddar

Olive oil for pizza base

Salt and pepper

Wilt kale in pan using olive oil - do not fully cook.  Remove from pan and set aside.  Place sliced onion in pan with olive oil and/or butter and cook on low until the onions are browned, but not burnt.  Add sage at the end to brown. Roll out dough and let rest for 10 minutes.  Brush with olive oil.  Add toppings and bake approximately 15 minutes or when crust is golden brown.

 

Your farmers,

John and Aimee Good

The Good Farm

8112 Church Road

Germansville PA 18053

484-262-0675

www.goodfarmcsa.com

facebook.com/goodfarmcsa

instagram.com/goodfarmcsa  

Posted 10/2/2018 12:32pm by John and Aimee Good.

All the recipes listed below, and many more, are on our website, on our Recipe Page. You can search by vegetable, using the search box on the right!

We hope you enjoy using these recipes and finding your own new recipes featuring the vegetables in your share. Please feel free to share any recipes that you love with us!

 

YOU CAN EAT YOUR CARROT GREENS!

They are super nutritious, with a flavor kind of like a cross between carrot and parsley. (The two plants are in the same family, so that's not surprising.)

Check out this link for 10 great ideas of ways to use carrot greens, including pesto, chimichurri, broth for soup, and more.

https://www.shape.com/healthy-eating/meal-ideas/carrot-recipes-carrot-tops

Butternut Poblano Soup

Ingredients:

· 1 large butternut squash

· 1 large poblano pepper

· 3 cups milk

· 1/2 cup butter

· 1 1/4 cups onion, diced

· 1 rib celery, finely chopped (or sub. celeriac)

· 2-4 cloves garlic, minced

· 2 tablespoons flour or cornstarch

· 1 tablespoon salt

· 1 tablespoons chili powder

· 1 tablespoon parsley, finely chopped

· 1 teaspoon black pepper

· 1 teaspoon coriander

· 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon

· 1/8 teaspoon rosemary, dried

· 2 cups vegetable or chicken broth

Directions:

Preheat oven to 400. Cut butternut squash in half lengthwise and remove seeds and pulp with a spoon. Place squash cut-side down on a baking sheet with about an inch of water. Roast squash for 45 minutes or until soft.

Meanwhile, roast poblano at 400 for 15 minutes, turning halfway through roasting time.

Set squash and pepper aside to cool.
 Pull poblano stem gently to remove stem and seed pod. (If it does not come out, just slice it open and remove the seeds.) Chop remaining poblano finely. Use a spoon to scoop flesh from squash.

Place squash flesh in a blender or food processor with milk. Puree until smooth and set aside.

In a large stockpot, melt butter over medium heat. Add onion, celery, and garlic. Saute for 15 minutes, stirring until onions and celery are soft. Add flour and dry spices to form a paste. Stir constantly and cook until bubbling, about 6 minutes.

Stir in broth and poblano. Simmer for 5 minutes, stirring often. Add squash and milk mixture, stirring often. Cook for 10 minutes.

Butternut Squash Gnocchi with Sage Butter

*This is my absolute favorite recipe for butternut squash. Takes some planning, but not much actual prep time. And so worth it!

Ingredients
1 butternut squash (about 1 1/2 pounds)

2 large eggs, lightly beaten

1 1/4 tsp. salt

1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour

Sage Butter Sauce

4 ounces (1 stick) butter

12 fresh sage leaves (I have substituted dried as well)

2 ounces Parmesan cheese, grated (about 1/2 cup)

salt, to taste

fresh ground pepper, to taste

Instructions

Postition a rack in the lower third of the oven and preheat ot 350 F. Cut the squash in half lengthwise, through the stem end, and place on a greased cookie sheet. Roast until tender, about 35 minutes.

When cool enough to handle, scoop out and discard seeds. Remove squash flesh (pulp) and place in a sieve. Set the sieve over a bowl to catch liquid and all squash to drain in a refrigerator overnight.

The next day, puree the squash in a food processor. Transfer puree to a bowl and add the eggs and salt, stirring to combine. Add the flour and blend thoroughly. The dough should be sticky and soft.

Bring a large pot of water to a boil Using a teaspoon, form walnut-sized pieces of dough nad push them off the spoon and into the water with your fingers. Alternately, use a pastry bag and a knife.

Cook the gnocchi in batches, 10 to 15 pieces. Once the gnocchi have risen to the surface, poach for exactly 2 minutes. Remove gnocchi with a slotted spoon and set aside to drain. Repeat until all the dough is used up.

Sage butter sauce prep

Place butter in a large skillet and cook over medium heat until the foam subsides and the butter begins to lightly brown. Add the sage leaves, a pinch of salt, and pepper.

Add the gnocchi to the browned butter, tossing to coat. Sprinkle with Parmesan and serve immediately.

Serve 6.

Pumpkin Chocolate Chip Bread

*Adapted from The Joy of Cooking.

You can make this bread with any cooked mashed winter squash such as butternut or sweet potatoes.

Preheat oven to 350. Grease a 9 by 5 inch loaf pan.

Whisk together thoroughly:

1 1/2 c. unbleached all-purpose flour

1 1/2 tsp. ground cinnamon

1 tsp. baking soda

1 tsp. salt

1 tsp. ground ginger

1/2 tsp. ground nutmeg

1/4 tsp. ground cloves

1/4 tsp. baking powder

Combine in another bowl:

1/3 cup milk (or water)

1/2 tsp. vanilla

In a large bowl, beat until creamy, about 30 seconds:

6 tbsp. unsalted butter, softened

Gradually add and beat on high until lightened in color and texture, 3-4 minutes:

3/4 - 1 cup sugar, rapadura, or coconut sugar, etc.

Beat in 1 at at time:

2 large eggs

Add and beat on low speed until just blended:

1 cup pumpkin puree*

Add flour mixture to wet mixture, gently mixing with a spoon or spatula until just combined. Fold in:

1/2 - 1 cup chocolate chips (can substitute 1/2 c. raisins and/or 1/2 c. walnuts here)

Spread batter into greased pan. Bake about 1 hour, until toothpick inserted into center comes out clean. Let cool in pan for 5-10 minutes before un-molding to cool completely.

*For pumpkin puree: cut any winter squash in half. Place cut side down in a baking pan with about 1/2 - 1 inch of water in bottom. Bake at 350 until pierced tender with a fork, about 35-45 minutes. Let cool slightly and then scrape out flesh with a spoon and puree in food processor. Measure any unused portion into 1 or 2 cup measures and freeze for soup, pie, bread, etc.

 

Your farmers,

John and Aimee Good

The Good Farm

8112 Church Road

Germansville PA 18053

484-262-0675

www.goodfarmcsa.com

facebook.com/goodfarmcsa

instagram.com/goodfarmcsa  

Posted 10/2/2018 12:08pm by John and Aimee Good.

Harvesting greens on a misty morning!

Farmer John is cutting lettuce mix this morning for pickup today. Cannot beat the freshness and flavor of just picked greens! 

The return of the greens season is here! Salad mix & arugula this week. Next week we should have the fall kale varieties - Dinosaur or Lacinato, Curly kale, and Red kale. Bok choy and hakurei turnips, with beautiful greens, are close, 1-2 weeks. Towards the end of the month - Napa cabbages as well as savoy and green cabbages.

NEW! Fall carrots are in this week! These are what we would call baby carrots, although they are more like adolescent in terms of their growth state, not fully mature yet.

They are extremely sweet, crisp and delicious. You can roast them whole with a bit of the green top, very pretty and delicious, or just eat them as snacks! Check the recipe email for ideas on using the carrot tops!

New winter squash this week - butternut! Butternut squash is the hardiest, best-keeping, and most versatile winter squash, which is why we grow a lot of it!  It is great for soups, breads, pies; roasting, and saute.

2 basic ways to get to the yummy orange flesh inside this hard shell:

1) Cut squash in half. Scoop out seeds. Place cut side down in baking dish with about a half inch of water. Roast at 350-375 for about 30 - 40 minutes, until tender, should pierce easily with a fork. You can also roast them on the grill, for a smokier flavor. Just brush cut side with olive oil first to prevent sticking.

You can eat roasted squash this way, with butter & maple syrup or salt and thyme, or other savory seasoning.  Or let cool and scoop out flesh with a spoon. For pies, etc. you can puree flesh in a food processor for smoothest texture.

This method is very easy, but requires more time!

2) Cut squash in half. Scoop out seeds. Peel skin. This is hard, but you once you have the squash peeled, you can cut it into cubes and it cooks very quickly, in a saute pan or roasted in the oven. You can also steam the cubes and puree the flesh.

*Because I don't enjoy peeling butternut squash, I usually only use this method if I want to cook the squash quickly, such as in a saute with onion, garlic, sweet pepper, and black beans for burritos.

Check the recipe page for some butternut squash recipes, including butternut squash gnocchi, winter curry, pumpkin soup, pumpkin pie, pumpkin bread, and more.

*Butternut squash puree is often used in place of pumpkin in many recipes. If it seems too watery, you can strain it overnight in cheesecloth, colander or sieve, over a bowl in the fridge, to thicken.

BELOW: Butternut squash curing in the greenhouse

THE HARVEST

Salad Mix &/or Arugula

Colored & green peppers

Leeks

Garlic

Butternut Squash

 Yellow Onions

Carrot bunches

Garlic

Choice table: radishes, eggplant, potatoes, sweet potatoes, red tomatoes, green tomatoes

Coming Soon:  kale, red beets, cabbage, bok choy, hakurei turnips, more taters & sweet taters

 

UPICK at the Farm:

OPEN HOURS: Tuesdays and Fridays, 8 am - 7 pm. Wednesday and Saturday mornings, 9 am - noon.

Cherry & paste tomatoes - pick what you can find

Green beans: Final planting is in, plus still some Dragon Tongue beans. 1-2 quarts per share

Flowers & Herbs 

Hot peppers - up to 1 pint, assorted varieties, see whiteboard for specifics

 

Harvest list is subject to change weekly. This is our best estimation of the week's shares. Thanks for understanding!

 

 *EXTRA SHARES: Eggs, bread, coffee & fruit

Fruit: Bartlett pears- excellent rich flavor, best when fully ripe!

Liberty apples - small & tart, very crisp white flesh - great for eating and baking.

Crimson crisp (my new favorite)- small to medium, beautiful crimson skin, very crisp and sweet with a hint of tart, slightly yellow flesh, excellent eating eating. Fine for baking also.

Jonathon - medium sweet apple, light red skin, great for baking and eating.

*Fruit storage tips: Pears will take a while on the counter, almost a week, to ripen fully, with a nice soft texture and sweetness. Apples should be stored in the fridge, for best flavor and crispness. Apples can be eaten right away, but will keep for a few weeks also.

TIP: FRESH APPLE SAUCE IS EASY & DELICIOUS!

When my apple drawer in the fridge becomes too full, I usually make an easy apple crisp or fresh apple sauce. Both are delicious and great ways to use lots of apples. Also, an apple peeler-corer makes these projects very quick, and kids love to turn the crank to do the peeler-corer. Available for about $25, this is a great kitchen gadget.

For fresh apple sauce, peel & core the apples. Place in a large pot, with about an inch of water in the bottom. Cover and bring to a boil. Turn down to a simmer and remove lid. Stir occasionally and let cook until apples are very tender. Blend all with an immersion blender for a smooth sauce, or mash with a potato masher for a more textured version. Enjoy hot or cold. Store remainder in glass jars. Will keep for several weeks.

 

CSA Extras :  Good Farm pasta sauce and Good Farm salsa, mild, as well as Old-fashioned Ketchup!    Still have Good Farm tote bags too! Order here, or pick up in the barn at on-farm pickup.





Your farmers,

John and Aimee Good

The Good Farm

8112 Church Road

Germansville PA 18053

484-262-0675

www.goodfarmcsa.com

facebook.com/goodfarmcsa

instagram.com/goodfarmcsa

Posted 9/25/2018 10:33am by John and Aimee Good.

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Your pickup is %%pickup-time%%, %%pickup-location%%.

If you have scheduled any pickup changes, they are listed here - %%scheduled-actions%%.      Please let me know if these are not correct! Thanks!

Spider webs abound on the farm this time of year. The number of spiders living in and around the fields is astounding. On dewy mornings when the sun is shining, you can see webs everywhere - on the ground, between the rows of veggies, in the wild patches bordering the farm fields.

This lady on the left is a yellow garden spider, Argiope aurantia, a common inhabitant of the tomato patches. This beautiful spider is one of our favorites, making a gorgeous classic orb web, and helping us control insect pests in the fields. Interestingly, she will eat most of her web every evening, and then spin a new one in the morning. She is very mild-mannered, and is not bothered by us picking around her.

You may see these yellow garden spiders in the Upick garden, especially in the tomato patch.  An organic farm is home to so many creatures.

Sadly, the tomato harvest is coming to an end. It has been a very good season for tomatoes on the farm, beginning in early July and continuing through most of September!  Considering all the wet and humid weather this summer, we are quite happy that the plants produced as well as they did, thanks to the special care given them by farmer John.

October has more in store for us: Bolero carrots, the sweetest carrots we grow, are growing beautifully, and hopefully harvest will begin next week. Red beets should be in shortly thereafter. The kale and cabbages are coming along nicely, as is the 2nd and 3rd broccoli successions. Unfortunately the 1st succession succumbed to brown rot during the extremely wet weather in early September. The butternut harvest was excellent, and they are curing in the greenhouse right now. The bok choy, hakurei turnips, and salad greens are looking good for the month of October as well!

The cutest farm inhabitant,

A gray-green tree frog sitting on a zucchini leaf.

This pic was taken earlier this summer.

THE HARVEST

Salad Mix

Red radishes

Sweet colored peppers

Leeks

Eggplant - Asian & or Bell

Garlic

MIX AND MATCH: Sweet Potatoes & Red/Gold potatoes

 Choice table: Yellow Onions, Red tomatoes, Green tomatoes, Winter Squash

Coming Soon:  butternut squash, kale, red beets, fall carrots, cabbage, arugula

 

UPICK at the Farm:

OPEN HOURS: Tuesdays and Fridays, 8 am - 7 pm. Wednesday and Saturday mornings, 9 am - noon.

Cherry & paste tomatoes - pick what you can find

Green beans: pick what you can find. New planting should be ready next week.

Flowers & Herbs 

Hot peppers - up to 1 pint, assorted varieties, see whiteboard for specifics

 

Harvest list is subject to change weekly. This is our best estimation of the week's shares. Thanks for understanding!

 

 *EXTRA SHARES: Cheese, eggs, bread, coffee & fruit

Fruit: Bartlett pears, Honeycrisp - large & very sweet apples, Gala apples - medium-sized and crisp, and new Liberty apples - small & tart

*Fruit storage tips: Pears will take a while on the counter, almost a week, to ripen fully, with a nice soft texture and sweetness. Apples should be stored in the fridge, for best flavor and crispness. Apples can be eaten right away, but will keep for a few weeks also.

 

CSA Extras :  2nds sweet peppers for freezing, making pepper jelly, chutney, etc.  Please order here, and select your pickup day/location at checkout. Thanks!

Now available - Good Farm pasta sauce and mild salsa, as well as old-fashioned Ketchup!    Still have Good Farm tote bags too! Order here, or pick up in the barn at on-farm pickup.

 

Need to schedule a pickup change or vacation hold? Click here.

Need to check your balance? Click here.

 

More ways below, to find what you need to know:

CSA Pickup/ Upick Hours  - lists hours for all pickup sites, as well as Farm Upick times

CSA Pickup Changes - you can login to your member account with your email address to change contact info, check your balance, make a payment, schedule a vacation hold and double pickup, switch to a different pickup day or location for a week, etc. (To permanently change your pickup location, you need to contact Aimee.)

News & Blog - Missed an email? Want to review an old one? You can find all our email posts here in our blog archive.

Recipes - Every week we post new recipes highlighting the vegetables in your share. Most recent additions will be at the top of the page, but we have quite a lot of recipes on this page, and you can search by vegetable to find many more ideas!



Your farmers,

John and Aimee Good

The Good Farm

8112 Church Road

Germansville PA 18053

484-262-0675

www.goodfarmcsa.com

facebook.com/goodfarmcsa

instagram.com/goodfarmcsa

Join our mailing list
Blog archives

The Good Farm is a certified organic farm raising vegetables, berries, flowers, and herbs for over 200 "farm share" members. Farmers John and Aimee Good specialize in providing the best quality and most flavorful varieties of the vegetables you love to eat- the staples! We have happy members - over 70% return every year!

 

Our customers say they eat healthier, feel better, save money, become inspired cooks, and even lose weight by joining the farm. Experience the joy of putting a delicious meal on the table by your own two hands. It's easy when the ingredients are this fresh and this good.

 

Support a type of farm that you can believe in; the kind you imagined as a child; where people pick the produce by hand, the soils are thriving, and the fields are full of life.

 

Become a CSA member today, it's the gift to yourself that keeps giving back! 

"Because The Good Farm makes you feel GOOD!"

8112 Church Rd.
Germansville, PA 18053
484-262-0675
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